The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, March 29, 1962, Image 1

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    Vol. 75, No. 88
The Daily Nebraskan
Thursday, March 29, 1962
Relate to Grants
iimm
Bo
w
By HAL BROWN
Editor's note: This is an
other of the releases of stu
dent work originating in the
Depth Reporting cfass at the
University. This particular
story, written by Hal Brown,
who has already received na
tional prominence for his
work on other stories, deals
.
BIG 8 MONEY SPENT ON GRANTS-IN-AID 1961 -
Figures obtained Individually from athletic directors of each school.
Teom Footboli Bosketbcll Track Baseball Wrestling Tennis Golf Swimming Totals
Colorado 146,064 30,005 14,348 5,446 2,652 464 965 1,18 4 201,123
19
Iowa State 107,025 30,844 11,684 4,865 9,770 957 957 4,905 171,007
kansas - 100,019 25,948 28,176 5,709 1,439 1,052 2,934 165,277
Kansas State 79,307 23,016 13,185 6,862 5,919 500 231 668 129,688
"Missouri 108,600 23,989 21,400 9,000 none none 162,989
Nebraska 95,862 , 18,092 20,142 5,330 1,035 none none 2,131 142,595
Oklahoma 82,314 21,409 26,385 . 12,914 21,109 6,608 3,316 13,317 187,372
Oklahoma State 107,758 25,234 16,439' 17,070 18,909 4,833 3,965 194,203
Totals 826,949 198,537 151,759 67,196 59,394 14,801 10,486 ' 25,139 1,354,264
Does not compete.
NSA Head to Speak
To Students April 16;
Council Vote Delayed
The Student Council vote on
University affiliation with the
National Student Association
(NSA) has been postponed un
til April 13 by a vote of 23-8
to make it possible for Ed
Garvey, president of the NSA
to address the student body
Monday, April 16.
USNSA Report
The Student Council's
USNSA study committee sub
mitted its 38-page report on
structure, finances, and NSA
value to the University at the
Council Wednesday.
Included in the report is
the entire NSA Constitution;
the March 1962. financial re
port; a three-levtl description
of NSA's regional set-up, na
tional organization and the
role of the National Execu
tive Council; and an analysis
of the relations and benefits
of NSA to the University.
NSA study committee co
chairman John Abrahamzon
noted that the report con
tained no stands either pro
or con on the NSA.
'Specific issues which face
NSA or which it has taken
stands on were also deleted,"
said Abrahamzdh, "since
these issues have been widely
disciissed and studied in the
Daily Nebraskan and in cam
pus organizations."
Butler Answers
NSA study committee mem-
ber Nancy Butler answered
the objection of Al Plummer
on the omission of the Har
vard University minority re
port favoring continued affil
iation with USNSA. Parts of
the majority report, which
Council to Hold
NSA Discussion
In Student Union
The Student Council execu
tive committee will hold an
open discussion on the Na
tional Student Association
(NSA) Tuesday at 3 p.m. in
the Student Union. :
"The panel discussion will
allow all students and groups
on campus to come before the
Council executive committee
and ask any questions they
have about the NSA," said
Council President Steve Gage.
Groups wishing to ask spe
cific Questions of the execu
tive council should contact
Gage through the Student
Council office by Monday
noon, submitting the questions
tney aesire to asK.
with grants-in-aid to athletes
in the Big Eight Conference.
Colorado in football . . . Col
orado in basketball . . . Kan
sas in track . . . Oklahoma
in swimming.
Sounds like Big Eight cham
pions. It is. But it is also
the Big Eight schools with the
most number of boys on
was strongly against affilia
tion, were included.
We did not include the
Harvard University minority
report, since we understood
that the Nebraskan was plan
ning to make copies of both
the majority and the minor
ity reports available," said
Miss Butler.
"Our prime objective was
to present only that material
which is current and unbi
ased," read the preface to
the NSA report.
NSA studv committee co-
chairman is Jeanne Garner.
Members were Steve Abbott,
Roger Anderson, Nancy But
ler. Vickv Cullen. Bob Cun
ningham, Kathy Mads en,
Larry Roos, Darrel Rogers,
Doug Thorn and Tom Wright.
Other Business
In other Council business,
election chairman Don Witt
announced that forms needed
for filing for Student Council
will be available in the Stu
dent Affairs office Monday.
The forms must be secured
bv both college and organi
zational representatives.
CCIIN chairman Bill Buck
ley reported that University
students H. P. Tipnis, Joel
Lundak and Jim Moore had
left Wednesday for the Mid
west Model United Nations
conference in St. Louis at
Washington University.
The three delegates wiu re
nnrt on their representation
of Nationalist China In the
General Assembly and on the
week's Council meeting.
Susie Christiauson was
Educators Hear
Lutheran Choir
The 80-voice University
Lutheran Chapel Choir is one
of the three choirs in t h e
U.S. selected to sing at a ses
sion of the Music Educators
National Conference.
Harrv Giesselman. director
nf the choir, is a eraduate of
the University and is now a
professor of music at Con
cordia Teachers College in
Seward.
Campus Pastor A. .J. Nor
den, who will accompany the
Chanel Choir to Chicago, will
sneak at the same session on
"The Place of Music in Wor
ship." Alan Krueger, Uruver
sity senior in Teachers Col
ppf is Dresident of the Choir,
Some of the selectiohs they
will sing are: "Alleluia,"
"Halleluiah. Amen and Chor
ale," "the Lord's Prayer'
and "A Mighty Fortress."
scholarships in the respective
sports.
In four of the five Big Eight
sports completed for the cur
rent school year, the cham
pion in that sport also leads
the conference in number of
boys on grants-in-aid for that
sport. In other words, the sta
tistics thus far for 1961-62 in
dicate that scholarships spell
victory.
62
sworn in as the official rep
resentative of the Union
Board of Managers.
The Judiciary committee
approved the Phi Beta
j-amoaa ana Buuaers con
stitutions and deferred action
on the UNICORN constitution.
Miss Swihart
Theta Sigs
To Honor
Journalists
Outstanding women on Ne
braska newspapers will be
honored Friday by the Uni
versity chapter of Theta Sig
ma Phi, women's journulism
honorary.
The annual Matrix banquet
will be at 6:30 p.m. in the In
dian Suite of the Student Un
ion. Awards will go to winners
in three divisions of the four
writing and make-up areas.
Women of the Year awards
will be presented to the top
women in the daily and week
ly fields.
Past winners have includ
ed: 1961 Betty Person, Lin-
coin Star; Helen Lough, Al
bion Newspapers. 1960 Bess
Jenkins, Lincoln Journal;
Yvonne Heenan, Ralston Re
corder. 1959 Nancy Ray, Lin
coln Star, Lilas Thomas,
Keith County News.
1958' Evelyn Simpson,
Omaha World-Herald; Ruth
Jane Davis, Sidney Tele
graph. 1957 Marjorie Mar-
lette, Lincoln Journal; Reva
Evans, Gordon Journal.
Miss Florence Swihart, ed
ucation editor of the Des
Moines Register and a Uni
v e r s i t y graduate, is the
- ?
uim n$ol if4
speaker.
The onlv snort in which this
doesn't hold true is wrestling
wnere ukianonia witn au wres
tlers receiving aid finished
second to Oklahoma State
with its 19 wrestlers on
grants-in-aid.
Wins, Grants Relationship
Rut. using figures obtained
individually from each of the
athletic directors in the i con
ference, the relation between
winning and number of grants
stands ud in football, basket
ball, track, and swimming.
(The figures do not include
sports in which there is no
championship competition in
the Big Eight. This excludes
such sports.as gymnastics and
skiing from the charts.)
For instance. Colorado's Big
Eight football champions
topped the list of football
players receiving aid with 110.
Not all ot these were tun
erants. which is also the
case at all schools.
The Buffaloes also led in
monev snent with $146,064 for
football grants. Money fig
ures, however, must ne care
fully weighed because of vary
ing costs at the difterent
schools for tuition, room ana
board.
According to Big Eight reg
ulations, the maximum an
athlete may receive is tuition,
registration fees, room, board,
books, and ?15 per monui tor
laundry and incidentals. The
$15 per month is limitea to
football and basketball at
most schools. ,
Athletic Dormitory
Oklahoma, for example, has
no room costs because it op
erates its own athletic dormi
tory. The last place team in foot
ball, Kansas State, had 84
players on grants-in-aid. Only
Iowa State with 75 was lower.
Nebraska's 85 grants put it
in a tie for 5th with Okla
homa in number of grants.
However, Oklahoma finished
fourth and the Huskers tied
for sixth in the standings.
Colorado also leads in bas
ketball grants with 30. And
the Buffaloes won the Big
Eight title in that sport also.
Kansas, the lowest school in
hasketball grants with 19. fin
ished in a last-place tie with
Missouri. Nebraska witn one
more grant than Kansas fin
ished in a tie tor bin.
Sorority, Fraternity Problems Theme
To be Given at Greek Week Talks
Harold Angelo. dean of men
at the University of C o 1 o
rado, will speak on "Sorority
and Fraternity Problems at
the Greek Week Convocation
at 7:30 p.m. in the Student
Union Ballroom.
Dean Angelo, a member of
Phi Kappa Tau fratnerity, re
ceived his B.S. degree from
Mississippi State University
and received an L.L.B. and
M.B.A. from the University of
Michigan.
He served as associate pro
fessor of business administra
tion and assistant dean at
the Amos Tuck Graduate
School of Business Adminis
tration, Dartmouth College,
Hanover, New Hampshire,
from 1955-59. He was appoint
ed dean of men at Coloardo
at that time.
He was a member of the
National Council of Phi Kap
pa Tau from 1953 till 1959,
and has been national presi
dent since that year.
In connection with Greek
Week, 1,200 fraternity and
Dr, Palmer Uses Freedom of Speech
In Rebuttal to Mean's Recent Charge
"l think it is my duty to
say what I think, It is part
of my American freedom."
This was the reply of Dr.
Edgcr Palmer, professor of
statistics, to charges that, he
either resign or be fired be
cause of statements made dur
ing a debate at a recent Peo-ple-to-People
meeting.
The charges were made by
Dr. Arden V. Means, candi
date for the Board of Re
gents, after the meeting in
which Dr. Palmer said the
"the United States should
disarm and become a weak
nation. When a nation be
comes dominate, the others
(nations) unite against it."
The same story holds true
in track with Big Eight cham
pion Kansas leading the
schools in track . grants. The
Jayhawks have 31 athletes on
track grants. Iowa State,
last-place finisher, gives only
12 track grants.
Oklahoma State leads in
baseball scholarships with 17
and is perennial Big Eight
champion in the sport. The
conference's swimming
champion is nearly always
Oklahoma and the Sooners
top the grants in that sport
with 12.
The only sport where the
comparison between grants
and standings falls down is
in wrestling. Oklahoma State,
the Big Eight mat champion,
gives 19 grants while Okla
homa second-place finisher,
heads the chart with 30.
Kansas State's 25 wrestlers
receiving some form of aid is
misleading since only $5,519
is split among these 25.
Judge Money, Number
In many other instances
one must judge both the mon
ey and the number of grants
to come up, with a fair ap
praisal. A good case for this is Iowa
State which ranks last in foot
ball grants, but in money
spent on these grants ranks
fourth. Mainly responsible for
this is the large number of
out-of-state players receiving
aid, thus doubling the tuition
cost.
Numbers in parentheses show team's finish in that sport.
Team Football Basketball Track Baseball Wrestling Tennis Golf Swimming Totofsj
Colorado 110(1) 30(1) 25 (6) 11 7(5) 3 4. 7(5) 197
Iowa State 75(5) 22(3) 12(8) 5 10(3) 1 ! 5(3) 131
Kansas 94(2) 19(7) 31(1) 7 3 5 9(2) 168
Kansas Stare 84(8) 21(2) 19(7) 16 25(6) 2 1 2(6) 170
Missouri 100(2) 24(7) 24(4) 10 0 0 158
Nebraska 85(6) 20(5) 24(2) 12 12(4) 0 0 11 (4) 164
Oklahoma 85(4) 25(5) 30(5) 15 30(2) 6 6 12(1) 20
Oklahoma State 100 (6) 22(4) 20(3) 17 19(1) 4 4 186
Totals- 733 183 185 93 103 19 21 45 1,396
Does not compete.
sorority pledges and actives
will participate in a one day
canvass of Lincoln for the
Multiple Sclerosis Society on
April 7.
Harold Goff, publicity chair
Dr. Means said, "It is in
conceivable to me that this
man who desires this impo
tent status for the United
States could possibly do a
proper job to advance Ne
braska in his office as direc
tor of business research.
"Although Dr. Palmer is a
Quaker, the Board of Regents
and University Administration
should act to question his mo
tives, which 'seek to destroy
our faith in the traditions
and Institutions which are the
guardians of individual liber
ty. The right of academic
freedom to teach is balanced
by the obligation to be honest
and forthright in that which
is taught."
A- j
This aid refers to money
given in compliance with Big
Eight and NCAA regulations
and does not take into ac
count any money such as is
under study at Colorado, or
that brought Oklahoma a
probationary sentence from
the NCAA, or that has
brought investigations at two
other conference schools.
For a high school graduate
to qualify for financial help,
he must have ranked in the
upper two-thirds of his grad
uating class or earn a per
centile rank of at least 50 on
a test prepared by the con
ference. $1.3 Million in Grants
The Big Eight grants-in-aid
represent a payroll of $1.3
million paid to 1,396 athletes
for the current school year.
Some would call it a fair
sized business venture. Oth
ers contend that it is not a
business.
Whenever discussions arise
over athletic scholarships the
question, "Is it worth it?" is
always asked. Those who
contend that it is worth it
can point to the standings in
various sports.
Gordy Chalmers, athletic
director at Iowa State, points
out, "The proportion of a
school's success is relative to
the scholarships available."
Whether you call it a busi
ness or not, it has been grow
ing by leaps and bounds in
BIG 8 GRANTS-IN-AID & STANDINGS 1961
man of the Lincoln Multiple
Sclerosis chapter, said the
one-day fund drive will re
place the chapter's usual money-raising
effort during the
spring.
In reply, Dr. Palmer stated
"I did not use the word
"weak," nor did I imply that
the United States should be
come weak in any way, I ar
gued for the reduction of
arms in a debate with a mill
tary man, which has got noth
ing to do with teaching."
When asked about the
charge that he "should resign
or be fired immediately Dr.
Palmer said that he had no
plans" for either, and. "I
don't think he really means
it."
"I do not mention this in
my classes, which are sta
tistics' courses, because it is
not pertinent," Dr. Palmer
concluded.
the past few years. If it con
tinues to grow at the present
rate, by 1967 Big Eight
schools will be spending ap
proximately $2 million on
grants-in-aid.
60 Per Cent Increase
The figure has jumped by
60 per cent since 1956-57. In
that year, conference schools
spent $811,104 for 966 boys.
Today they are spending
$1,354,264.
Part of this increase can
be accounted for by the addi
tion of Oklahoma State to the
conference, but it doesn't ac
count for the entire total.
Again the question comes
up. Is it all worth it?. Some
say it is while others contend
that the days of pure ama
teurism were better.
Among those in the latter
category are such as George
(Potsy) Clarke, former Ne
braska athletic director, who
says, "No matter how much
is spent, at least four teams
are going to finish in the sec
ond division.
Four Waste Money
"Only four of the teams can
finish in the upper division so
that means whatever the oth
er four spent is wasted," he
continues.
Iowa State's Chalmers says
he would favor returning to
the days before all-out re
cruiting. (Continued on page 3)
- 62
World's Fair
Deadline Is
Tomorrow
Final deadline for signing
up for the Seattle World's
Fair Tour is tomorrow.
The Tour will take place
during Spring Vacation with
students leaving Lincoln the
morning of April 24 and will
have an eight hour stay over
in Denver. A bus trip to Boul
der and tour of Denver are
planned for the stay over. Stu
dents will arrive back in Lin
coln April 29.
Students may sign up in the
Union Program office by Fri
day at which time a $75 down
payment will be due. All ex
penses are covered in the to
tal cost of $250.
Panhell Names
Newest Pledges
Second semester sorority
pledges have been announced
by the Panhellenic office.
The following girls were
pledged.
ALPHA CHI OMEGA: Fran
ces Hazen.ALPHA OMICRON
PI: Ann Wiggins, ALPHA XI
DELTA: Claire Bentall, AL
PHA PHI: Connie Spelts,
GAMMA PHI BETA: Margy
Martin, KAPPA DELTA:
Mary Karel, Sandra Zimmer
man, Laura Jane Couse,
KAPPA GAMMA GAMMA:
Virginia Pansing, Jane Rae
Rosch; PHI BETA PHI. Lynn
Faris, SIGMA KAPPA: Jerri
Olson, Eleanor Vance, ZETA
TAU ALPHA: Sharon Tripe,
JoRene Layton, Pam Veon.
Mortar Board Telia
Of House Awards
Mortar Board is sponsor
ing a Scholarship -Activities
award again this year. First
and second place trophies will
be awarded to the outstand
ing organized houses.