The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, March 15, 1961, Page Page 4, Image 4

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    Page 4
The Nebraskan
.Wednesday, March 15, 1 961
Botany Student Finds New Plant Cell;
Instructor Can't Prove Her Wrong
But the book says it's not
suppose to be there!
This was the remark of
Karallee Shaner, freshman
botany student, who found a
particular type of cell in the
stem of plants which the book
did not mention.
And Prof. John Davidson,
botany instructor, said "She
has the evidence, and
we cant prove that she is
wrong."
Miss Shaner's finding Is the
result of a new teaching
method employed by David'
on. The instructor has de
veloped a new teaching meth
od of "drawing out" in
formation from his botany
students rather than "cram
ming" in facts and producing
unexpected results.
The teaching method that
Professor Davidson is using
does not rely on textbooks,
but rather on actual study of
the plants. He believes that if
a student reads a textbook be
fore examining a plant, this
student will be conditioned to
see the pattern exactly de
scribed by the book.
He found through years of
experience, that students are
more interested in what the
teacher or textbook say ra
ther than what the plant
shows. To correct this, he ap
plied the study of plants
without anticipation of' what
students will find.
Class Discussion
These students then present
their' findings before the en
tire class. If other students
disagree with the findings,
then it is back to the plant
to discover the correct solu
tion, said Dr. Davidson.
In this case, Miss Shaner
says the cells she found in
the stem came from a dif
ferent source than the text
books claim.
The coed says she consid
ered the class" the best she
ROTC Riflers
Shoot Saturday
The Army ROTC team will
compete in the National Rifle
Registered Approved Match
at St. Louis, Mo., this week
end, accordingto Capt. Rex
Wallace.
The team, recent winners of
the Department of Defense's
annual William Randolph
Hearst ROTC Marksmanship
Competition, will leave Fri
day, shoot Saturday and re
turn Sunday, he noted.
Ten men will participate
for Nebraska in the meet,
which is expected to attract
at least 15 schools, he said.
Union Sponsors
Buttons, Bows
Be sure to attend the But
tons and Bows style show to
be held tonight in the Union
ballroom. The Union-sponsored
event will begin at 7:30
p.m.
LITTLE MAN
(M. 1 -nK Gamio caizce
warn. mp e I $jw It?
WJffa
Y P
has ever had." Working with
two other coeds, she claims
she can find out things for
herself. "This made her feel
good," she said.
"All students had to be
able to verify everything stat
ed in the class. If anyone
didn't, there were always ob
jections from the other stu
dents." i -
Miss Shamer came to the
University with the intent of
becoming a history teacher.
But after taking botany, she
, lllllllipliilil ) f K 8
r- 1 liliSllllp"'' if 1
Examining plants instead of reading about them are (from left, seated) University
students Karalee Shaner, Carla Tortora and Jim Bowmann. Looking on are Prof. John
Davidson and Clyde Brashier, a graduate assistant.
Dean Peterson
Leads Discussion
Do you believe in atheism?
Dr. Raleigh Peterson, dean
of Cotner School of Religion,
will attempt to help answer
this Question Thursday at a
discussion session to be held
in 232 Student Union at 4:30
p.m.
The discussion session will
deal with the significance of
atheism in relation to religion
and the different types and
causes of atheism.
Sue Christensen, chairman
of the talks and topics com
mittee sponsoring the event
said atheism was chosen as
the subject of the discussion
because often students claim
atheistic beliefs without real
ly understanding the signifi
cance of the term.
"Dr. Petersen's view may
help students to understand
the actual meaning of athe
ism," she said.
Read Nebraskan
Want Ads
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'. -
m
'became so interested in her
theory on the source of these
certain cells that she changed
her major to botany. Miss
Shaner now plans to continue
with graduate work, after
getting bachelor's degree in
three years.
New Interpretations
Dr. Davidson said that each
year the students whose eyes
and brains aren't conditioned
to see a certain pattern always
come up with new interpre
tations. Many of these theor
POISON IVY!!!
Spring-Like Weather
Livens Social Scene
By Norm Beatty
The spring thaw, slow as
it is, has produced four more
pinnings and an engagement
IM Spikers Slate
North Court
Wednesday:
5:00 Law College vs. Sen
ior Dents
6:30 Beta Sigma Psi-A vs.
Sigma Alpha Mu
7:30 Alpha Gamma Sig
ma vs. Sigma Nu
8:30 Acacia vs. Zeta Beta
Tau
Thursday:
5:00 Delta Taul Delta
Sigma Chi winner vs. Al
pha Tau Omega-Beta Theta
Pi winner.
6:30 Cornhusker Coop
Sigma Alpha Epsilon win
ner vs. Alpha Gamma Rho
7:30 Delta Sigma Pi-Ag
Men winner vs. Alpha Gam
ma Sigma-Sigma NU win
ner. 8:30 Delta Upsilon-B vs.
Sigma Nu-B
South Court
Wednesday:
5:00 Phi Epsilon Kappa
vs. Dental College
6:30 Delta Sigma Pi vs.
Ag Men
7:30 Pi Kappa Phi vs. Pi
oneer. Thursday:
5:00 Phi Delta Theta-Phi
Gamma Delta winner vs.
Farmhouse -Theta Xi win-
ner
8:30
A
Avery-A vs. Benton-
SPECIAL STl'DEIST DISCOUNTS
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Contact Placement Office
for Interview Schedule
ies, he said, can't be d i s-
proved and prove intriguing
to many or tne protessionais
in the field.
The professor said that
progress is slow at tne De
ginning of the semester but
as the students become more
accurate in their research
work, they cover more ma
terial before the end of se
mester than by the tradition
al method. The material also,
he says, remains longer with
the students.
on the Nebraska campus over
the past week.
Leading the pinning parade
this week are two Gamma
Phi Beta's.
Pinnings
Miss Linda Turnbull, Gam
ma Phi Beta, junior in
Teachers College from
Billings, Mont, to Charles
Humphrey, Delta Upsilon,
senior: in Mechanical Engi
neering from Mullen.
Miss Jackie litis, Gamma
Phi Beta, sophomore in
Teacher's College from Hins
dale, 111., to Pat Tooley,
Delta Tau Delta, junior in
pre-pharmacy from Colum
bus. Miss Marlus Lane of Platts
mouth to Dan W e h r b e i n,
Alpha Gamma Rho, junior in
Agriculture from P 1 a 1 1 s
mouth. Miss Jean Carlson, Kappa
Kappa Gamma, sophomore in
Teacher's College from Lin
coln to Charles Greenwald,
Sigma Phi Epsilon, senior
in Teacher's College from
Henderson, Kentucky.
' Engagement
Miss Lynn Borgelt, Fedde
Hall, sophomore in home
economics from Broken Bow
to Eddie Holcomb. senior in
Agronomy from Wisner.
The early spring-like weath
er also prompted a mock
weaaing, on Ag campus. Miss
Judy Smith, a junior in Arts
and Sciences from Lincoln to
Ralph Tollman, a sophomore
in Arts ana sciences from
Wayne.
MOV..THUR.S. KITES
Jap aV
Photography
Contest Open
To Students
(UPS) All students of
the world may participate in
a photography contest organ
ized by the International Bu
reau for Cultural Activities
(IBCA) in cooperation with
the international student
magazine "The Student."
IBCA is an office es
tablished by the International
Student Conference more
than three years ago for pro
moting student cultural ac
tivities and international cul
tural exchange.
Any student currently' en
rolled in a university, in any
area of the world, may en
ter. A maximum of six pho
tographers per entrant is al
lowed. The size should be
approximately 13 by 18 cms.
(inches) although other di
mensions will be permitted if
necessary for full artistic ef
fect of the photograph. '
Both black and white and
colored prints will be accept
ed. The contest has two sub
jects: '.'Student Life" and
"The Society in which we
Live." These subjects may be
interpreted as desired.
The contest started in Jan
uary, and will remain open
until December 31, 1961.
There is no entry fee, but
all photographs will become
IBCA's property who will
havej full reproduction rights j
over them. J
The photographs should be
sent to IBCA. On the back
of each print should be clear
ly written the name and ad
dress of the photographer,
the category and the subject
of the photograph. Each con
testant should also send in
an entry form which may be
obtained from IBCA, Post
Box 36, Leiden, Netherlands.
Prize winners will be an
nounced in the March 1962
edition of "The Student." The
photographs will be judged
by a jury consisting of the
director of IBCA, the editor
of "The Student," two Dutch
professional photographers
and the staff of the Coordi
nating Secretariat of National
Unions of Students (COSEC).
The prize-winning photo
graphs will be displayed at
the 10th ISC and valuable
prizes will be offered to the
winners. There will also be
smaller prizes for each cate
gory, and some honorable
mentions.
Main Feature Clock
. Varsity: "Cry for Happy,"
1:00, 3:05, 5:10, 7:15, 9:20.
State: "The Unfaithfuls,"
1:00, 4:12, 7:14, 10:06. "Herod
the Great," 2:30, 5:41, 8:43. i
Bright Idea with a glowing future
1
ft ?(msJ-y
it J
If
m
GENERAL
Hey Brute,
To the Student of Shake
speare the Ides of March may
have some significance for it
was on that . day1 that the
Roman, Jutius Ceasar spoke
his famous line, "Et tu
Brute," and died at the hands
of his countrymen.
Until recently, March 15
was also the day of reconning
YWCA Group Hosts
Easter Egg Search
The Special projects Com
mittee of the YWCA is spon
soring an Easter Egg hunt
for the children from White
Hall, Sunday.
Lunch will be served at the
Lutheran Student House with
the hunt afterwards in back
of the girls' dorm. The 24
children will be between the
ages of six and nine.
Nebraskan
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SERVICE REPAIR
Trofeaalonal, guaranteed aarrlca of ra
dio, television, hi fl, b)r a former
service technician now In Engineering
Collage. C 1 1 Nell Wellenstetn.
ID 4-6051.
FOR RENT
Pleasant lnexptnilre complete Uvlng
for woman atudent. HE 2-4814, 1615
FOR SALE
Btandard Remington Typewriter $25.
Good condition call HE 1-0278.
LOST AND FOUND
Spiral Claaa Notebook In Burnett March
3. Reward. Contact Joan Maxlne
Brown. HE 5-2001.
CAN'T AFFORD TO DRIVE HOME
ALONE FOR VACATION????
GET RIDERS TO SHARE EXPENSES II
PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD IN THE
DAILY NEBRASKAN EARLY
At Gen Tel, research is put to work to advanc
communications through sight as well as sound.
The dial of our compact Stakute phone, for
example, utilizes an entirely new source of light
that marks a milestone in visual communications
Called Panelucent (electroluminescent) lighting,
It produce! light without heat, has no bulb to turn
on and off, and costs less than 1C a year for
electricity.
Pioneored and developed by the Lighting Products
Division of our subsidiary, Sylvania, this dramatic
new light opens up almost infinite product possi
bilities in sight communication. Already it is being
used for clock faces, radio dials, auto instrument
panels and road signs.
And, through the development of an ingenious
"cross-grid" design, electroluminescent panels ar
now capable of reproducing alpha-numeric "read
outs", for electronic computers. This achievement;
in fact, may one day lead to "flat wall" TV.
It is another example of the way General Telephone
& Electronics coordinates the scientific and engi
neering leadership of many divisions in order to
make communications progress on all fronts.
Trei tlu
TELEPHONES ELECTRONICS m
It's Idas!
with the government as in
come taxes were due on that
date.
During, the' time of the
Roman Empire, the calendar
was based on the changes of
the moon and the Ides marked
the day of the first full moon.
In the Roman calendar
four of the months, including
March, had 31 days while the
rest of the months had only
nine. The Ides of the long
month fell on the 15th day and
on the 13th day of the shorter
months. ,
March marked the first
month of the Roman year and
December was the tenth. In .
the days of the Romans there
were probably only 10 months
because the middle of win
ter, when nothing happened
anyway, was ignored.
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