The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, April 25, 1960, Page Page 4, Image 4

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    Page 4
I JCAPtFUS I
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For Week of April 25-30
MOMMY:
CITY YWCA. cabinet meeting. 4 p.m.. 232 Union.
'TENNIS, Nebraska vs. Drake, 1 p.m.. Coliseum courts.
PHYSIOLOGY LECTURE, Dr. John J. Biesele, 3 p.m.,
Bessey Hall auditorium.
GENETICS LECTURE, Dr. H. H. Kramer, Purdue, 4
p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Keim Hall.
AMERICAN ASSN. OF UNI. PROFESSORS, 6:30 p.m.,
Pan American Room, Union.
ENGINEERS WEEK, all week.
TUESDAY:
RELIGION STUDY GROUP, COMMUNISM, 4 p.m., 232
Burnett.
. AG YMCA-YWCA, cabinet meeting, 6:30 p.m., Food and
Nutrition Bldg.
AG YMCA-YWCA, program meeting, 7:15 p.m., Food
and Nutrition Bldg.
' HOME ECONOMICS HOSPITALITY DAY, all day, Ag
Union.
TENNIS, Nebr. vs. Washburn University, 1 p.m., Coli
seum courts.
' PHYSIOLOGY LECTURE, Dr. Biesele, 12 noon, 104
Plant Industry Bldg.
MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIUM, Prof. John Gurland,
3 p.m., 209 Burnett Hall.
AMERICAN STATISTICAL ASSN. LECTURE, Prof.
Gurland, 8 p.m., 107 Burnett Hall.
, GENETICS LECTURE, Dr. Kramer, 4 p.m., Keim Hall
auditorium.
MEN'S GLEE. CONCERT, Prof. Dale B. Ganz, 7:30
" " p.m., Union ballroom.
AMERICAN CHEM SOCIETY LECTURE, Dr. Scott
Searles Jr., 7:30 p.m., 324 Avery.
WEDNESDAY:
RELIGION STUDY GROUP, racial tensions, 5 p.m.,
Presby House.
" CITY YWCA, community service, 4 p.m., 341 Union.
CITY YWCA, religion group, 5 p.m., 232 Union.
HOSPITALITY DAY, all day, Ag Union.
FILM SOCIETY, "Flamenco" (French), 8 p.m., Ne
braska Theater.
THURSDAY:
CITY YWCA, projects, 4 p.m-, 334 Union.
CITY YWCA,' word community, 5 p.m., 340 Union.
CITY YWCA, love and marriage, 5 p.m., 334 Union.
RELIGION STUDY GROUP, politics and evangelism,
- - - -2 p.m., Cotner.
' "ENGINEERS WEEK, open house, 2-9 p.m., city cam-
pus.
TENNIS, Nebr. vs. Omaha University, 2 p.m., Coliseum
courts.
SEMINAR, center orientation, 2 and 7 p.m., 320 Burnett
Hall.
PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM, Fred T. Phelps, research as
sistant, 4:15 p.m., 211 Brace Laboratory.
GERMAN FILM, "Confessions of a Confidence Man,"
7:30 p.m., Love Library.
FRIDAY:
ENGINEERS WEEK CONVOCATION, E. 0. Morton,
speaker, 11 a.m., Union ballroom.
BASEBALL, Nebr. vs. Colorado Uni., (two games), 1:30
p.m., University diamond.
SPRING DAY, festivities start at 2 p.m., city campus.
SEMINAR, computer center orientation, 2 and 7 p.m.,
320 Burnett Hall.
ENGINEERS WEEK, awards banquet, 6:30 p.m., Cot
ner Terrace.
SATURDAY:
IVY DAY, lawn behind old Administration Bldg., 11th
and R; band concert, 9:35 a.m.; court enters, 9:50
a.m.; Chancellor Clifford M. Hardin speaks, 10:10
. a.m.; men's sing begins, 10:20 a.m.; .court re
cesses, 11:45 a.m.; court returns, 1 p.m.; women's
sing begins, 1:05 p.m.; sing winners announced,
2:30 p.m.; Mortar Boards and Innocents begin
masking and tackling new members, 2:45 p.m.;
ceremonies complete, about 4:30 p.m.
BASEBALL, Nebr. vs. Colorado, 1:30 p.m., University
diamond.
GOLF, Nebr'. vs. Creighton University.
Agronomists
Dr. Kramer
Dr. H. H. Kramer, Depart
ment of Agronomy, Purdue
University, will present a ser
ies of three lectures today
and Tuesday in Keim Hall.
The first ' lecture, "Gene
Control of Endosperm Carbo
hydrates in Corn," will be
presented Monday at 4 p.m.
in Room 244.
"Travel, Genetics and Plant
Breeding in the Sovie.t Un
ion" is the second lecture to
be presented at 7:30 p.m.
Monday also in Room 244.
The last lecture "Gene
Control of Endosperm Carbo
hydrates in Corn," will be
Tuesday at 4 p.m.
Dr. Kramer obtained h i s
Bachelor of Science degree
at Colorado State University
in June, 1939. His Master's
Tcmpero Heads
Nu Med Club
Ken Tempero, junior in Arts
and Sciences, has been elect
ed president of the Nu Meds
for the 1960-61 term. Tempero
is a member of Theta Xi fra
ternity. Byron Dilow, sophomore,
was elected, vice-president.
Kathy Paulman, sophomore,
is secretary and treasurer in
Monte Novak. Al Rhoda is
publicity chairman for the
group.
COLLEGE
feulnrlnti
Jim Herbert's Dixie Land Band
730 8:30
and Stacy Garner Orch. till 1:00 am
Doors cpen at 7:00
TURNPIKE
It.ltO prr person Km HE 5-9812
'11 ' i
Feature
at Lectures
degree was granted at the
University on Minnesota in
1941 and his Ph. D. at the
same school in 1945.
At Purdue, Dr. Kramer e's-
tablished a program to sur
vey new crops of potential
industrial importance for the
Midwest and initiated a plant
breeding program to develop
adapted varieties of plants
which appear promising.
He also conducted a forage
crops breeding program.
Dr. Kramer is a member
of Sigma Chi social frater
nity and Phi Kappa Phi and
Alpha Zeta honoraries.
Faculty Plans
To Be Reviewed
"Is the Faculty Insurance
Program Adequate?" will be
the subject of a talk by Prof.
Cecil Vanderzee before a din
ner meeting of the University
chapter of the American Assn.
of University Professors to
night at 6:30 in the Pan Amer
ican room of the Student
Union.
Prof. Vanderzee is chair
man of the Faculty Senate
committee on insurance and
retirement plans.
PHILLIP MORRIS
SAVE-A-PACK
and win o 3 channel stereo
NITE
Saturday
April 30
LITTLE MAN
"SORRV ABOUT VERPAV.rtlSS LATOUR. IT'S JU5TTHAT Wff
VCV tflDOfA HAVE A Gia ENROLLED IN AM OA5S
Maj. Haag
To Teach
AirROTG
JfW. II Ace
Is Ass't Prof.
Major George B. Haag. de
scribed by his former base as
"one of the Air Force's fore
most pilots. will Degin
teaching Air Force ROTC at
the University as an assistant
professor in May.
Haag has flown Air Force
planes to all points on the
earth, ranging from Rio de
MAJOR HAAG
Janeiro to Thule and embrac
ing the entire Pacific and
North Atlantic areas.
He holds the Distinguished
Flying Cross and the Air Med
al with numerous clusters.
Since entering the Air
Force in 1941 Haag has had
over 11.000 flying hours to his
credit. This puts him in the
top five per cent of Air Force
pilots.
During World War II, Haag
flow 30 bombing missions over
France and Germany, return
ing unharmed from all of
them. Returning to the Uni
ted States in 1945, he was be
ing trained for air rescue
work when the war ended.
Stationed in Japan at the
outbreak of Korean hostilities.
Haag was the pilot of the
plane that lifted the first cas
ualties out of that country.
He has been with MATS, the
strategic airlift force, since
1948.
Nrlrakan
Want AHs
No. Worrisild. 2 da. I 8 la I 4 da
T-To AO .to I . $ PTon
11-15 i .mi I no I i "or," i i .aT
16-20 .WlT .95 1 25 i i !W
2125 170 1.10il 4 sTY 7
28-30 .SO 125 1 W.TTni)
31 -36 j .90 I 1.4fi1 s"2T5
3R-40
I
1.55 I V 05 I
The.p lou--rntt rnt( anplv to Wunt
AH which nrp pin cert fnr rorecuttvp
flavs nnd pnirl for within V fnv
nfter the ;ui expire or 1 riftln) Ar1
to be prints! In thf rblftPf( irttrin
nf (hp DaHv Nehrnilnn mil it he
arrnmpn nierl by the rvtme of the person 1
plncinp smIiI ad.
Kent rent T- Hpnrtnn trailer, tr. ft..
attirhetf ax1fl knotty pine tu-1v
room. Will Rll bfjth, set up for
living, at just a little over the
value of trailer alone. Ounlttv
thronphout. See it now -move tn
East er va cat mp ( or before i . Bank
will nandle inrire percent n pre. Con
tract. . on balarr-e ff needed. Iot
106-G. 4000 Cornhiixker Hwy,
19nR BulrK Convertible Fully powered
Atrpoi.se. 24.000 mi1e. Vogue wti'te
wall Life tiep. VVonderhnr radio,
heater, tonneau. Original owner
IV9-;i333.
19.VI Chevrolet Coupe fWmd Merlin
cal Condition, .sv.'ti. Call IV !-:,-
Wanted. Il-'tiMern u work
contai't Howard Ki
UK 2-3120
Dressmakinp' or aheraiions dune
reasonjDie prices in rnraiUL-to-(l3M
8(y)C4. Coin, tu Mavia. 4I Nu.
Lpurtment for r'-nt:
AI.I. NEW ANll REARONABLF
TOO. One heriroom with stove. r- 1
friKerator. brHkfat bar and stooln !
LocMted in heautiml neichborhoo.i. i
Couple rwri occupy now, ('alp
G A 3-1HH alter 5.
wanted 1 ry.l b:
TAILORING ' -VV. VJfJf
The Doily Nebraskan
ON CAMPUS
Block, Bridle
Honors Dean
At Banquet
Honored at the Block and
Bridle Club banquet Friday
night was Dr. Marvel L. Bak
er, assistant dean of agricul
ture at the University.
He is the 19th stockman se
lected for special recognition
by the Block and Bridle Club
members. His portrait will be
placed in the Animal Hus
bandry Hall on the College of
Agriculture campus.
Three guest speakers out
lined Dr. Baker's contribu
tions. They included Dr. A. D.
"Dad" Weber, vice president
of Kansas State University;
Bruce Snyder, Paxton ranch
er and Dr. Keith Gregory re
gional coordinator of beef
breeding research at the De
partment of Agriculture.
Dr. Baker began research
work here in 1924 when he
joined the faculty.
He has worked with the Ag
ricultural F.xperiment Station
divisions and has served as
dean of the University of Ne
braska faculty and Ankara
and Ataturk Universities in
Turkey.
He will soon leave for Tur
key again to conduct an in
spection of University activi
ties. His Influence on agricultur
al sciences was recognized by
Kansas State University
when he was awarded an hon
orary Doctor of Science de
gree' in 1919.
lave a real ciqareffe-have a
i . ' : t- r -t - w 1
I l - (CAf." I'-' tKiMESTIC fi'V "
The best tobacco makes the best sioke!
Student
Tumi nor
Student, health will begin
typing the blood of members
of the Walking Blood Bank
this week.
: It will be possible to handle
up to 30 persons per day in
the 45 minute period from 3
3:45 p.m. which will be re
served each day specifically
for the purpose of typing
blood, Dr. Samuel Fuenning,
director of Student Health,
announced.
300 Signed Up
Fuenning said that more
than 300 persons had signed
up for membership in the pro
gram. A yearly drive will be spon
sored to maintain the mem
bership in the Bipod Bank
program, Fuenning: said. .
Other Student Health pro
grams which have been ad
vanced from the planning
stages recently include the in
stallation of two civil defense
sirens, the planning of a cam
pus health council and a
change in the Student Health
insurance program.
The sirens, which are co
ordinated with the other
warning sirens of the city,
have been installed on t h e
roof of Bancroft school on
city campus and the roof of
the biochemistry building lo
cated on Ag campus.
These sirens will serve as
a warning against tornados
Don Geis
To Organize
Adlai Club
An organizational meeting
for a "Stevenson for Presi
dent Club" will be held Tues
day night in Student Union
338 for all interested people
including faculty members
Don Geis. past president of
University Young Democrats,
said that althougn Stevensnr,
has not declared himself as a
candidate for th presidency,
organizations throughout the
country are supporting nini.
Because of his outstanding
capabilities it is fell there
are many who aie interested
in his candidacy for presiden
cy, Geis said.
A statewide organization
will therefore be formed Tues
day evening, according to
Geis.
One of the first projects of
the club will be to circulate
petitions endorsing Adlai Ste
venson for president. It is
hoped that by the Democratic
national convention in Los
Angeles this summer, five
million signatures from the
nation will have been secured
in Stevenson's behalf, Geis
remarked.
Health To Begin
Rlnnd This Week
. ...nil o. tny Aafanca wam-ZStlOn
in (i nnmnsps
Disaster Program
The sirens are one phase
Of a campus disaster pro
gram which is being put into
effect by the University's Dis
aster Program Committee.
The purposed campns
Health Council would be com
posed of representatives from
all organized houses and
other interested group, Dr.
Fuenning said.
The Council, to be set up
under Student Council super
vision, would be important to
the coordination of health pro
grams, planning and evaiu-
B&B Award
Presented
To Wehrbein
Roger Wehrbein, Alpha
Gamma Rho senior, was an
nounced the out s t a n d i n g
Block and Bridle Club mem
ber at the club's honors ban
quet Friday night.
Award Basis
The award was based .on
scholastic ability, activities in
the club and all University ac
tivities. Farm House was announced
the judging contest winner
Members on the team include:
Robert Ambrosek, Marsh
Kuhr, Deon Stuthman, George
Ahlschwede and Mylon Fil
kins. Burr Hall placed second
followed by Alpha Gamma
Rho, Tappa Kega Day and
Independents.
In the meats judging contest
the individual divisional win
ners are: Don Meiergerd,
meats judging, pork and beef;
Rich Eberspacher, carcass
grading and total points; and
Leslie Cook, lambs.
Senior Division
In the senior division of the
judging contest winners were:
Gary McDonald, sheep; John
Joyner, swine; Douglas Gus
tafson, cattle; Larry Williams,
quarter horses; and all class
es, Fernando Lagos.
Junior division contest win
ners were: Robert Ambrosek,
sheep; Marv Daniels, swine;
Frank Puis, cattle; and Rob
ert Ambrosek, all classes.
Showmanship winners are
Lloyd Langemeier, Grand
Champion Showman and
swine; Don Kavan, beef; and
George Ahlschwede, sheep.
SPACt CRAFT
LEAVING SOON. I
FOR RESERVATIONS
I CALL -PLUTO, 4189
.v....iWII,lIX'yjWWff ' '""
1 6,
Monday, April 25, i960
programing, Dr.
explained.
Ol
Fuenning
The new neaun wauiduca
program will include a revi.
sion of insurance benefits.
Under the terms of the new
policy, the aggregate cover,
age limit would be 55,000
rather than the present $1,000.
However, the maternity cov.
erage will be deleted. This is
due to the fact that : mater,
nity claims have been one of
the largest claims in the past
years causing a loss to the
insurance company.
Figures show that the
premium collected for U n i
versity health insurance was
only about one half of the
amount paid out in claims
each year, Dr. Fuenning
said.
He said this was true even
though the number carrying
the insurance had increased
noticeably each year since
the program was established
in 1951.
The new policy will cover
a 12 month period. There will
be a slight change in the
premium, he said, but not an
unreasonable one.
Biesele Lectures
Are Scheduled
Dr. John J. Biesele, profes
sor of zoology at the Univer
sity of Texas, will lecture
twice this week, once on city
campus and again on Ag cam-
Dr. Biesele, who .was to
have lectured last week, will
speak today at 3 p.m. in Bes
sey Hall auditorium on ''Ef
fects of Some Purines in Free
and Combined Forms on Cul
tured Cells."
Thursday at 12 noon in 104
Plant Industry, Dr. Biesele
will discuss "Chromosomal
Changes During Carcinogene
sis." ma
hmmmw
- C I n A R V. TTF i
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