The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, March 16, 1956, Page Page 4, Image 4

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Poge
The Religious VJeek
r
THE NEBRASKAN
An Ecumenial Missionary Team,
Benjamin Lall of India and Robert
Thorp, a missionary to Guatema
la, will be at the University Mon
day through Wednesday.
The team is visiting selected
campuses throughout the country
for the purpose of sharing with
atudenta their understanding of the
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message and mission of the Church
in a world in revolution and of
talking . individually with students
who are interested vocationally in
Christian missions.
Lall is Executive Secretary of the
North India Synodical Board of the
United Church of North India and
Thorp is director of the University
Student Center and professor at the
Presbyterian Theological Seminary
in Guatemala City, Guatemala.
Aids
Glassblower:
Rare Skill
NU
Scientists
Tasks including everything from
making glass atomizers small
enough to hold in the palm of the!
hand to repairing the chipped nms
of huge glass milk jars is the job
of Walter Sampson, University
glass technician.
Sampson, has organized a thriv
ing business in Avery Laboratory
since he arrived in 1950.
The University's glassblower pro
vides professors and graduates en
gaged in research with the special
equipment needed to carry on their
work.
H i s creations are numerous.
Geiger counters for cosmic ray
research, special flasks for wheat
rust experimentation and equip
ment therefor soil-testing labora
tory are just a few.
Sampson's skill enables the Uni
versity to save many dollars it
would ordinarily have to spend to
purchase the same equipment.
Very few people today know the
art of glassblowing. Sampson ac
quired his skill from an old Ger
man professor at Iowa State University.
The team will apeak at Presby
House Monday at 4 p.m. and at
a Faculty-Student tea at 4 p.m.
Tuesday at Rosabouton Hall.
Presbyterian-Congregatlona'.
333 No. 14th
Sunday: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., forum
with The Rev. Verne Spindell of
of Vine Congregational Church
speaking on "Though He Died, Yet
Shall He Live."
Monday: 7 a.m. Bible study.
Tuesday: 7 p.m, Sigma Eta Chi.
Wednesday: 7 a.m, cabinet; 7
p.m, vespers.
Lenten Devotional Services, 12:30
p.m, Monday through Friday at
Cotner Chapel.
Lutheran Student House
535 No. 16th
Friday: 6:15 p.m, Mr & Mrs.
Club pot luck and program.
F nday: 9:30 a.m, Bible study;
9:i and 11 a.m, worship serv
ices; 5:30 p.m, LSA, joint supper
and program with Ag LSA; Bible
study and worship based on Seven
Last Words.
Tuesday: 7:15 p.m, course on
Romans.
Wednesday: 7 p.m. Lenten ves
pers; 7:15 p.m, choir.
Thursday: 7:30 p.m, Inquirer's
class.
Wesley Foundation
1417 R
Sunday: 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. morn
ing devotional services; 5 p.m,
Wesley fireside supper; 6 p.m,
forum on the subject of "Commu
nion" by the Rev. L. R. Davis;
6:45, worship. Communion will be
served.
Wednesday: 6:30 a.m, break
fast; 7:15, meditation lead by the
rtev. Bob Linder from Ceresco
Methodist Church.
University Lutheran Chapel
(Missouri Synod)
15th & Q
KimHnv 10:45 a.m. worship: 6
r
s
V
-.
t
s
u
Reider Quizzed
Henry Reider (right), chief re
torer for the University museum,
and his TV partner, Susan Rei
selt, of New York City, recently
won $900 bv correctly answering
questions on "Two for the Mon
ey." The questions were posed
by Herb Schriner.
Feud:
'Hillbilly Hilarities'
Theme For Carnival
'Woman's World':
Union To Present
Career Conference
The Inside
Worm
Adelphi
Newly elected officers of Adel
phi are Nancy Hunter, president;
Maureen Newhouse, v i c e-presi-dent;
Shirley Kilburn; secretary;
Maruta Grinbergs, treasurer; Lois
Jean Wolfe, historian, and Alverta
Strickland, pledge trainer.
'Pot Luck'
The last in a series of "Pot Luck
With The Profs" suppers will be
held Sunday at 5:30 p.m in the
Ag Union lounge, according to
Charlie Trumble, committee chairman.
Complimentary tickets may be
picked up at the Ag Union Activ
ities Office.
Ag Breakfast
The annual Ag College Pre-East-ter
Breakfast will be held Sunday
at 7 a.m., according to Jim Turner,
publicity chairman.
Dr. Dale Welch, president of
Hastings College, will be the guest
speaker.
Poetry Review
Bemiece Slote, associate protes
tor pf English, will review the
poetry of Karl Shapiro, recently
. appointed English professor, at
4 p.m. Wednesday in the Union
Fnriilt Lounee. Coffee will be
served.
AWS
Representative and alternates of
the AWS House of Representatives
will be required to attend a meet
ing next Thursday Sue Simmons,
AWS Board member, announced.
Officers
Newly elected officers of Farm
Slouse fraternity are Jim Feather,
president; Charles Trumble, vice
president; Leo Damkroger, secre
tary, and Jim Turner, treasurer.
p.m, student-alumni D a n q u e i
(County Attorney Elmer Scheele,
speaker).
Wednesday: 7 p.m, final Lenten
meditation; 7:30 p.m, choir.
Thursday: 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. cof
fee hours; 7 p.m, doctrine group.
Newman Club
1602 Q
Sunday: 8 a.m, 9 a.m, 10 a.m,
11 a.m, and 12 noon masses.
Monday through Saturday: 6:45
and 7:15 a.m, weekday masses.
Religion classes: 11 a.m, Tues
day, and Thursday; 7 p.m, Tues
day, Wednesday and Thursday.
Lenten devotions: 5 p.m, Sun
day; 5 and 8 p.m, Wednesday; and
7 p.m, Friday.
University Episcopal Chapel
246 No. 13th
Sunday: 11 p.m. worship serv
ice; 4 p.m, Canterbury study
groups; 6 p.m, Canterbury din
ner. Wednesday: 7 a.m, Holy Com
munion; 7 p.m, Lenten service;
7:30 p.m, choir rehearsal.
Unitarian
12th & H
Sunday: 1L a.m, worship serv
ice: 5 p.m, student group meeting.
Baptists and Disciples ot Christ
Student Fellowship
1237 R
Sunday: 5 p.m, Fellowship din
ner, worship and forum.
Tuesday: 7:30 a.m, chapel serv
ice.
Ag Interdenominational
34th & Holdrege
Sunday: 6:30 p.m, program, dis
cussion led by The Rev. Don Littiell
followed by worship and recreation.
No supper will be served.
South Street Temple
Friday: 8 p.m, services.
Sunday: 10:30 a.m, religious
school; 8 p.m, worship.
Ag College Activities Building
will be the scene of the annual Ag
Estes Carnival Friday, 8-11 p.m.
Theme of this year's Carnival is
"Hillbilly Hilarities," and it will
be centered around the original
Hatfield and McCoy feud, accord
ing to Walt Schmidt, chairman.
A costume contest will be one of
the features of the event. Prizes
will be awarded to the most orig
inally dressed hillbillies represent
ing Grace Hatfield and Henry Mc
Coy, the two survivors of the history-making
feud.
Organizations represented and
their booth themes and chairmen
are Love Hall, "Love Hollow,"
Helen Bishop and Janice Baker:
Loomis Hall, "Travelin' Tails,"
Mary Berger and Alice Sides;
Home Ec Club, "Patchwork Para
dise," Deanna Brier; VHEA, "Hill
billy Hit Parade," Genelle Jensen
and Marilyn Zuhlke; Alpha Gam
ma Sigma, "Hillbilly Wedding,"
Bob Lebruska; Ag Men, "Hillbilly
Hide-away," Gene Brier; Farm
House, "Save Will's Still," Don
Kilday, and Alpha Gamma Rho.
"Feudin' and Fight'n," Wilber
Wakefield.
Dancing will take place through
out the evening and winning booths
will also be presented at that time,
Schmidt said. Last year Love
Hall won first prize, Farm House
second, and Loomis Hall, third.
YWCA
YWCA commission groups will
feature speakers and films with
discussion this week. Battle for
Ballots, How to be Went With
and Chaplain's Workshop will be
held on Wednesday. Thursday's
groups are Noon Discussion,
You're on You're Own, A Christian
Believes, Comparative Religions
and Religion Through the Arts.
A series entitled "It's a Woman's
World" will be held Thursday aft
ernoon and evening at the Union
to help college women decide
"after college what?"
The conference will feature three
prominent Lincoln women discus
sing qualifications reeded in the
areai of home career and com
munity. Mrs. Norma Ver Maas will
speak on careers, Mrs. Carl Deite
meyer, Mrs. America of 1956, on
the home, and Mrs. Thomas Pans
ing, president of the Lincoln Cub
Scouts, on the community.
Mrs. Frances Vogel, Assistant
to the Dean of Women, will act
as moderator.
Presidents of the major women's
organizations will serve as hostess
es fc an informal coffee following
the discussion. The Union Convoca
tion Committee is in charge of the
event.
The evening section of the con
ference will eature a dramatic pre
sentation by Mrs. Frances Homer,
a dramatic actress from Cleve
land. She will present a group of
character sketches entitled "Brief
Chronicles of Women Today and
Yesterday."
Mrs. Homer, who has been in
the theater for 15 years, has
loured the United States, Canada,
England and France. She has
played leading roles in Tarking
ton's "Penrod" and O'Neil's "Be-
MRS. HOMER
yond the Horizon."
Her experience on the American
stag" hai contributed much to her
original character sketches which
hav wop for her national ac
claim.
Her sketches include such women j
as Mrs. John Adams, wife of a j
President,, and Mrs. Benedict Ar-'
nold.
Friday, Morch 16, 1955
YWCA Job
Interviews
Scheduled
Mifs Mary Alice Thomas, Ra-
cruitmr Consultant of the National
Board of the Young Women's Chris
tian Association, will be at Rosa
Bouton Hall on March 22 to inter.
view women students for prefes-
sional jobs in the YWCA.
Miss Thomas has been in th
Personnel Service Division of the
YWCA since 1948. She is respon
sible for work with National Board
members and local committees
carrying a national recruiting as
signment. Interviews with Miss Thomas
can be arranged by contacting
Miss Janice Osburn, Director of
the University YWCA, at 420 No.
16th.
APRIL FOOL
and St. Patrick's Cards
ar her
GOLDENROD
215 North 14
DANCING
at the
GREEN ROOM
Every Saturday Night
from 9-12
YMCA
210 No. 13th
Too Gold And Snowy To Wash
Your Gar?
HAVE IT WASHED AT THE
JET CAR WASH
A aiiprrb wash In
16 niln. for only
$1.50
2222 "O"
Open until 6:30 dally. Sun. 'til 1 p.m.
with WHITE WALLS $1.15
You Are Invited To Worship
ST. PAUL METHODIST CHURCH
12th and M Streets
iag Worship 11:00 A.M.
ermon topic:
"An All-ln Victory-
Church Study
Classes 9:45 A.M.
Radio Ministry Every Sunday
EFAB 8:00-9:15 A.M.
KFOR 11:30 A.M.
Ministers:
FRANK COURT. RALPH LEWIS, SAMUEL BEECHNER
DONALD BLISS WESLEY FOUNDATION
KEEP YOUR SUNDAYS SACRED
THROUGH THE HOLY HUSH OF WORSHIP!
3
Wi
doing
Otto Prnmln gar's j J
MAN I J
On..
U
pi'iuui. .11 .iiiuiiiiiiiiijiiiiuiimm J. ii
JLJ
Adult SOp Till 2 p.m. ISo 2-8 p.m.
Itflc After p.m.
NO CHILD .TICKETS KOMI.
J CHICKEN PEUGHT 1
nwjf $-2178 We ISOW Serve
OMelm DcilcM -I OC
Dinner I
OkMim Dlfta nr.
LAA SfllWk. ..... OJC
riBC Shrimp DellKlrt n O C
Dinner,.... I iJw
Delivery j;r
Dinner TfJC
! Opa Sewn Days A Week
115 So. 25th st
Hmm, it soys here ... the X,,
news of Spring is the light jf j ;
touch in Sport Coats from lY JM V ' 'f
AAGEE'S l'X-M
.. 13.50 and 16.50 I II
iMiif
at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft
QUENTIN'S
Town & Campus
Girls
Dresses
Sportswear
WE'VE COT 'EMI!
Priced to Suit
YOU
COME IN EIGHT AWAY!
R. P. I. Dedicates mama
Graduate Study Center
Near Main Plant
BBS
SI 1
-?tC' 11: a
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ik
ii.;
4
Engineers from Pratt I Whitney Aircraft waiting for dsuse to begin at R.P.I.' newgrdue
study center. Courses, leading to aavancca ocgrccs in ipaauwi '- "r"""-"
Engineering. Applied Mechania, Higher Mathematics, Thermodynamic!, Nuclear Technology.
Engineeri participating in graduate study program comple
ment their classroom training with laboratory experience
gained through their daily employment.
The dedication last month of a full-fledged graduate
center near the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft plant
in East Hartford, Connecticut, set a precedent in
relationships between industry and education. At
a cost of $600,000, P & W A's parent company
purchased and equipped the building that was pre
sented outright to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
for its Hartford Graduate Center. Moreover, an
additional grant by this industry leader to R.P.1.
was usecfto establish a liberal fellowship fund. Since
last fall, when classes first began, this tuition-assis-:
tance plan has functioned to assure advanced educa- j
tion for Pratt and Whitney Aircraft's applied sci i
entists and engineers.
1 The new graduate study center, 115 miles away
from its home campus in upper New York State,
is staffed by a resident, full-time faculty. Engineers
at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft and other companies
in the vicinity are able now to continue their educa
tion without interrupting their normal employment.
Designed to raise the level of knowledge and to
broaden the base from which research can be ap
proached, this unique new concept of education
will lead enrolled engineers to greater achievement
in their careers through pursuit of advanced degrees
in specialized fields from the nation's oldest engi
neering college.
Jack Justice is already In step with
Spring in his Ivy styled New Haven
model by Varsity Town. The trend
in Spring Sport Coats is lightness.
in weight and color ana
Magee's have a terrific selection.
. . . Ivy Sport Coats with all the
stylo and good looks well-dressed
colleqiates demand. In choice
tweeds, shetlands and newest stripe
eiiects.
29.50
and up
. . charcoal or brown flan-
,i;."r::,.f-:,jSl'
mmmmm ,r
lllliiilpSj ; "
iMWm&9M '" ' 1 sir v :
:;.:;:;AaSi.iiiii:s 'y". : .
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'tK-i.:.;, ' ?:;!.: f.!5; :. I '
Slacks .
nel.
The WSt facilities required for practical application of advanced technical knowledge to the
development of future aircraft engines are housed in P & W A i Willgoos Laboratory
the world's most complete, privately owned turbine laboratory.
P I llartfnril Crsrfiiatn Tantap - J '
... . aiHiniii wkii.vi, n UUC-KWJ
building in a suburban location, is just a few minutes'
drive from the P & W A plant. Student facilities include
a large lecture room, a library, classrooms, seminar room,
a cafeteria, and parking areas.
Men Clothing
"Magee'f Secnnd Floor
World's for$most designer and builder of aircraft engines
PRATT t VJHBTMEV AIRCRAFT
DIVISION Of UNITED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION
AST HARTFORD 8, CONNICUCUT