The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, November 10, 1953, Page Page 4, Image 5

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Paga 4
U Debaters Win
Honors In Tourney
Teams Visit South Dakota, Omaha
Universities On
Last weekend the University
debate teams entered their first
regular tournaments of the sea
son as they journeyed to the Uni-
Y Group
Party
Holds
At Omaha
Committee Sees
Menial Institute
Red and white streamers and
1 1JU penants decorated the social
room of the Nebraska Psychiat
ric Institute in Omaha Friday
evening. The occasion was "Col
lege Nite" sponsored by the Uni
versity YM-YW weekend serv-
" ice project committee.
A "Lil Abner" skit was pre
sented by Sherman Gillett,
, Charles Harris, Lee Spencer and
Barbara Hamilton. In addition
group games and folk dancing
- were led by Buzz Hargelroad
and Joyce Laase.
GRETCHEN DEVRIES gave a
humorous reading, and group
singing was directed by Lee
Spencer and Pat Moran. Darrel
DeGraw was master of cere
monies. Project members were told of
the mental health program of the
Institute by Mrs. Shoulder, head
nurse. Afterwards she took the
group on a tour of the institute.
A TWO-HOUR work session
consisting of a clean-up of the
grounds surrounding the Social
Settlement Association of Omaha
completed the day's activities.
The settlement group organize
the group's weekend accommo
dations. Chaperons attending Saturday
night's party were Annie Laurie
Smith and Ralph Garner of the
Love Memorial Library Staff.
Julius Samuels, professor of so
cial work, acted as adviser to the
group.
Pound Fund
Income Now
Sufficient
The Roscoe Pound lectureship
committee of the Nebraska State
Bar Association reports that the
income of the fund is now of suf
ficient amount to pay for the
annual lectures.
The Nebraska State Bar Asso
ciation has financed the previous
lectures because the fund could
not meet the expense.
MEMBERS OF the committee
reported that the fund is now
large enough to support lectures
"at least upon a basis of every
other year" but that they should
"continue their support of the
fund in every possible way."
The association and the Uni
versity alumni established the
lectureship in honor of the late
Roscoe Pound for his outstand
ing services as Dean of the Uni
versity College of Law.
Delta Omcron To Hold
Bake' Sale Wednesday
Delta Omicron, music sorority,
will hold its annual bake sale
Wednesday in the Music Build
ing. Cake, cookies, candy, coffee
and hot chocolate will be sold,
aid Carol -Lundberg, publicity
chairman.
How the
stars got
started...
Mm
Mow. it CSvUivum tnyti
I wes 1 7 wfarn they picked
am lot m small role in a
film. It wm four year of
hard work and experience
before bigrolet cam. Then
marriage and children
(even darliagi!) and
film role again! So I'm
enjoying two wonderful
careen V
for
c.
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- IMMMII
jTi ,',' X TRY THEM YOURSELF I ) J lt '! I J
Weekend Trip
versity of Omaha and the Uni
versity of South Dakota at Ver
million.
At Omaha, each team partici
pated in debate. The teams were
alternated in their entry so that
no team was eligible to compete
in the final rounds. This gave
more teams practice and made
the tournament more of a "warm
up" affair, Don Olson, the direc
tor of debate, said.
CHARLES KIFFIN and Don
Overholt won their two debates
as did Charles Klasek and Nor
man Alexander. Dick Fellman
and Jere McGaffey won two out
of three and Russel Gutting and
Jerry Igou lost their two rounds.
In discussion, another event in
the tournament, Dick Fellman
tied for first place with Don
Brown of Creighton University.
Jere McGaffey received second
place award.
At Vermillion, Homer Kenison
and Alan Overcash received su
perior ratings in debate, while
in the individual events Kenison
was given a superior in extempo
raneous speaking and Overcash
was awarded a superior in dis
cussion. SHARON MANGOLD and San
dra Reimers also went north and
received excellent ratings in both
debate and discussion.
No decisions were announced
at the University of South Da
kota tournament About twenty
schools submitted entries, re
ported Don Kline, instructor in
debate, who accompanied the de
baters. Smith Named
Outstanding
AUF Worker
Andy Smith was named the
outstanding worker of the year at
the AUF awards meeting Thurs
day evening.
Smith, active in all phases of
AUF, was cited for his work
as team captain for independent
solicitations, assistant to frater
nity captains, and assistant in
newspaper publicity.
Other award winners were:
Fran Locke, outstanding solici
tations worker; Sue Olson, out
standing publicity worker; and
Judy Joyce, outstanding team
captain.
PUBLICITY CERTIFICATES
were awarded to: Mary Kay
Beachler, Janet Dinsmore, and
Judy Joyce, independent team
captains; Marilyn Eaton and
Claire Hinman, sororities; Gloria
Harris and Polly Sauser, organ
ized houses; Ann Kokjer and
Fran Locke, organizations; Win
nie Lautenschlager and Diane
Young, faculty; Shirley Stohlman,
denominations; Dale Nitzel, Ag:
Andy Smith, fraternities; and
Martha Lee Miller and Cathy
Olds, independent solicitations.
Publicity awards went to: Jan
ice Carman, newspaper; Mary
Domingo and Neil Miller, booths;
Gail Katskee and Sharon Mas
gold, radio; Alan Kenyon, speak
ers; Cathy Olds, mass meetings;
and Sue Olson and Barbara Flan
agan, special events.
Delta Sigma Pi Tours
Kansas City Industries
An industrial tour of Kansas
City was made Friday and Sat
urday by Delta Sigma Pi, pro
fessional business, fraternity.
The tour was made by 18 mem
bers of the fraternity and Wayne
Moeller, faculty sponsor.
They visited Folger's Coffee
plant, Kansas City Board of
Trade, Buick-Oldsmobile-Pon-tiac
assembly plant, the Federal
Reserve Bank and the Kansas
City Post Office.
.
1 p l
' I KNOW WHAT I WANT ,j .
, f IN A CIGARETTE AND CAMELS , ''ydft 2
J HAVE IT TO ME NOTHING COMPARES ,f?4. C j
WITH CAMELS FOR MILD, J (J lp U
- V ENJOYABLE 5MOKNG. ' "" ' V 5 '!'- .,3-1
Swindler Presents
The Grand Island Independent
Trophy for the outstanding
high school yearbook is pre
sented to Patricia Coover, edi
tor of the 1954 Links by Dr.
William F. Swindler. Robert
Munger, publication adviser at
University Orchestra
Members Announced
Fifty-Six Students Selected;
First Concert To Be Nov. 22
Fifty-six students have been
selected as members of the 1953
1954 University Symphony Or
chestra, Emanuel Wishnow, con
ductor, announced.
The orchestra will give its
first concert Nov. 22 at 8 p.m.
in the Union Ballroom. At the
annual fall symphony concert
sponsored by the Union a na
tionally known artist will appear.
MEMBERS OF the orchestra
are:
Violin: Joan Szydlowski,
Sheila Brown, Charles Palmer,
Gayle Roxberg, Edward Lind
quist, Virginia McPeck, Alice
Saunders, Gail Katskee, Morris
Collier, Ruth Johnson, Don
Moul, Lucille Lavine, Hanna
Rosenberg, Barbara Jones. Rose
mary Weeks, Merwinna Kamp
man and Richard Delfs.
Viola: Louis Trzcinski (fac
ulty member), Harold Welch,
Beth Keenan and Arthur Mur
phy (faculty member).
Cello: Charles Klasek, Eliza
beth Templeton, Joanna Jorgen
sen, Robert Patterson, Carolyn
Roxberg, Darrel Schindler and
Joan Marshall.
BASS: MARILYN Paul,
George Work, Harold Spicknall,
John Marshall, David Renwick,
Lois Panwitz and Janet Shaw
ker. Flute: William Krause. Sarah
Jean Graham, Jane Munro and
Jeanne Greving.
Piccolo: Jane Munro.
Oboe: Velda Stonecypher. .
Bassoon: Charles Wright and
Glenna Berry.
Trumpet: Roger Brendle,
Duane Johnson and Jack Mc
Kie. Trombone: Stanley Shumway,
Wendell Friest and Fred Bou
cher. FRENCH HORN: Kenneth
Rumery, Denrr's Carroll, Gene
Hazen and Jjn Dawson,
Tuba: John Bowen.
(Continued from page 1)
Sander, Gerald Schiermeyer,
Charles Schuerman and Kaye
Don Wiggans.
Pledges are Kay Knudson,
Ronnie Rosse and Oscar Blom
stadt. According to Cap Dierks, the
Nebraska chapter has not yet
been accepted into the Interfra
ternity Council but hopes to be
Gamma Sigma will hold
a national conclave in Missouri
Nov. 27-28.
THAW ANY OTft&FL OGAPLETTE I
t jj'i IP HiHHijlWlHW illi'i atwmjI'U Jtin - Pimi r-M. mi
THE NEBRASKAN
1
Courtesy Lincoln Journal
Award
Lincoln High looks on. The
trophy was presented at the
braska High School Press As
awards luncheon of the Ne
sociation, where Lincoln High
was named winner of the
award.
Percussion: Kent Phillips,
Hal Mardis and Jerry Hum
phrey. Librarian: Kenneth Rumery.
Young Demos
To Attend
Convention
Nebraska Young Democrats
will fight for the right of 18-year-olds
to vote at a National Young
Democrats Convention in St.
Paul, Minn., Thursday.
Members of the Nebraska dele
g a t i o n include State Chairman
Don Knutzen, University graduate
assistant in geography, and Ron
Rader, graduate in history. The
delegates will leave for the three
day convention Wednesday.
THE DELEGATES have been
instructed to try to persuade the
National Young Democrats to
fight for 18-year-old voting in
their respective states.
Knutzen said another fight was
expected to arise at 'the conven
tion over the age limit of office
holders in the organization. He
explained that the age limit for
members is 18 to 40, but that men
over 40 have held offices on the
national level.
HE SAID that Texas will send
a split delegation of Democrats
and "Shivercrats," followers of
Texas' Gov. Shivers who led the
Southern Republican vote in
Texas for the last presidential
election.
Ex-President Harry Truman
and Adlai Stevenson, Democratic
candidate for president in the
1952 election, will speak.
Research Grant
Open To Women
The Lena Lake Forrest Fellow-
I ship to a woman for graduate re
search in 1954-55 is being offered
by the National Federation of
Business and Professional Wo
men's Clubs, Inc.
The project of the award is re
search in state laws relating to
employment. Its purpose is to de
termine which laws differentiate
between men and women and
how such differences affect wo
men's opportunities for employ
ment and advancement in each
state.
Applications for the $2,000
award may be obtained from the
National Federation of Business
and Professional Women's Clubs,
Inc., 1819 Broadway, New York,
N.Y. The completed blanks
should be returned by Jan. 10,
1954.
ir T n-KKimi n i TT n j, irrrmi 'III 1 1 I III I
Restrictions On Aid Students Amaze
German Transiereei Former Teacher
Steffen Compares US, German School Systems
By
BEVERLY DEEPE
Staff Writer
"It is a big, big question," said
Hans Steffen, foreign exchange
student from Germany, "as to
whether the American or Euro
pean educational system is bet
ter." "Probably the scholastic
achievement of the individual is
higher in Europe than in the
United States, but considering
the American definition that
everyone should have an equal
chance, the American system
must necessarily be considered
better."
STEFFEN, who taught school
a year and a half, continued say
ing that there were two main dif
ferences between the educational
systems of Europe and of Amer
ica: German youth attend high
school for nine years (from ages
10 to 19 . They are taught more
advanced subjects than American
students of the same age are
taught
A 10-year-old student can enter
high school if he can pass a
series of tests. Therefore, the
German student has five more
years of high school than the
American student. He begins to
learn a foreign language at 10;
at 12 he is studying chemistry
and physics.
He studies in high school until
he is 19 or 20, when he enters a
university. According to Steffen,
this means "that German stu
dents have two more years of
high school education ahead of
them when the American stu
dents are entering college; hence,
the German student is probably
at the level of the American jun-
Group To Discuss
Ag Organizations
The Ag YM-YWCA Freshman
Committee Group will meet Tues
day at 4 p.m. in the Home Ec
parlors of the Home Economics
Building.
Keith Erlewine and Elaine Mil
len will lead the discussion, which
will attempt to analyze the organ
izations on Ag campus. Topic will
be "The Purposes and Organiza
tions of the YM-YWCA."
If enough interest is shown, dis
cussions on dating may be held
later.
Essay Contest Opened
To University Students
All University undergraduates
are eligible to enter an essay
contest on "Communism and
Academic Freedom." A cash
award of $500 will be given for
the best essay.
Typewritten manuscripts
should be mailed to the Mat
thews Award Editor, The Amer
ican Mercury, 11 East 36th St.,
New York 16, N. Y.
The essays should be limited
to 2,000 words or less and sub
mitted by February 1. Only
original essays will be consid
ered. The winner will be announced
March 1.
Young Republicans
Plan Friday Dance
Approximately 5,000 invita
tions were sent to GOP'ers over
the state, and a good attend
ance is expected at the "Home
coming Dance" for Nebraska
Young Republicans, County
Chairman J. Max Harding an
nounced. The dance will be held Fri
day at 9 p.m. in the Cornhusker
Hotel ballroom. Admission will
be $1 a person.
State and party dignitaries ex
pected to attend include Sulli
van Barnes of Sioux Falls, S. D.,
chairman of the National Young
Republicans Federation and Gov.
Robert Crosby.
. Start
smoking
Camels
yourself!
Smoke only Cameli for
30 days and find out why
Camels are first in mild
ness, flavor and popular
ity! See how much pure
pleasure a cigarette can
fMm
ior college student when he enters
college.
"ALTHOUGH I do not know if
the American educational system
stresses vocational training;
that's one thing I want to find
out.
"The European school system
emphasizes humanities, and a lib
eral education because of tradi
tions in Europe that should be
upheld," Steffen said.
"Let me explain what I mean
by tradition. In the small village
where I taught last year, the
church was built in 1253 and the
family with which I boarded had
owned their farm since 1253. In
America there is not such a
strong tradition to be upheld.
Lucky Americans and lucky
American educators who do not
have the difficult job of develop
ing new subjects and methods
from the old," Steffen explained.
STEFFEN SAID Germany is
moving toward a new type of edu
cation similar to the progressive
education in America
He said, "Searching for a new
type of education, which would
be more adequate for children,
HAMMER 'NAILS
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QUICK
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issifiod
To place a classified ad
Stop in the Business Office Room 20
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Call 2-7631 Ext. 4226 for Oaseified
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Hours 1-4:20 Mon. thru hi.
THRIFTY AD RATES
No. words j 1 day 2 days 3 day. 4 days 1 weak
MO S" .40 1 $ .65 S .85 $1.00 $1.20 '
11-15 JO M 1X5 1.25" US
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home. As Coilg dintrtct. Keferencs.
S-4727.
TVPINO DONlthe." moot "court
brUfi. report. tc. Exprlencd. 2-S2A3.
CUC'RCH 'CtiSik has ojnlnM7or"'UKaT
and alto paid fololt mtmlwri Cppar
clnmn with eholr xprlnr pre
frrd. Phon 4-fi&M after S P.M.
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS: Nlca room for 2 nun. 1237
R. Phon 2-2304.
JUHJU FOR'RfcNT A Mucnt to stiare
room cookng prtvliKe. 1617 N. 33rd
aftn S p.m. 3.-7.
Tuesday. November 10, 1953, Q
IS a Dig ISSUe III XjUIUJJC. muai ut
the younger teachers favor the
first ideas or tnai new eaucauon
because they want to give chil
dren the opportunity for inde
pendent thinking. Formerly tha
teacher was the authority who
stated just how the subjects
should be taught; but now we
want to let the child do what ha
is capable of doing by himself."
STEFFEN ADDED that he was
surprised at the number of re
strictions on University students.
"In Germany it is unthought of
that girls must be in by a certain
time, or that a student should
attend class if there is something
else that he would rather be do
ing. Students are never guided
through school by advisors or
counselors."
Steffen said, "I think this is
due to the fact that younger stu
dents attend the universities here,
and that the universities feel that
they must take care of the stu
dents while they are away from
home."
Steffen, a student-at-large at tha
University, is studying education
methods which he can use upon
his return to Germany.
HAMMER "NAILS !
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65
Imported Fabric
HAMMER KAILS deflai
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FOR SALE
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Call Mra. bavla 7-2440 tot furthar
Informatlon.
condition LoV
rnllaatt. se ,t Capitol Automotive.
212 So. 19th. 2-2626.
LOST AND FOUND
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band Richard E. Olion. Ph. S-3.122.
E5ST "4"caFIya on kiy rKiTBalT
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