The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, February 24, 1914, Image 1

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TheDailyNebraskan
WE NEED ONLY
77
MORE STUDENT
SUBSCRIPTIONS
WE NEED ONLY
190
MORE FACULTY
SUBSCRIPTIONS
VOL. XIII. NO. 97
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA, LINCOLN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1914.
Price 5 Cents
MS
REVENGE
SPOILING THEIR FUN
-V .
TILE HELIGIBLE
ALL MISSOURI VALLEY QUARTER
CANNOT PLAY
NEW ELECTION TO BE HELD
Missouri Valley Conference Eligibility
Committee Rules Nebraska Cap
tain Out of the Game for
Coming Season.
Max Towle will never .again fight for
the Scarlet and Cream The fate of
Nebraska's captain has been sealed
The Missouri Valley Conference eligi
bility committee has unanimously
ruled Towle Ineligible
Some two months ago the question
of his ineligibility was raised It was
claimed at that time that this year
would complete his third year in Ne
braska sports Towle was a member
of a "joke baseball team" in the spring
of 1912 After playing three games
with minor colleges the team was dis
banded Towle was a member of this
unlucky team. The team was never
recognized bj the student body The
Athletic Board never granted letters
to the men or gave them life passes
It was not looked upon seriously
Towle placed on this 1912 baseball
team, football In 1912, and baseball In
1913. Last fall Towle's generalship
helped bring back another Missouri
Valley championship His team
mates rewarded him with the cap
taincy for 1914 Now he is black
listed To Nebni8kans this announce
ment will bring sorrow The "Husker"
machine of 1914 will lose an All Mis
souri Valley and All Western quarter
back. The fans will lose a loyal Corn
husker and thorough Nebraska gentle
man At present there are three possible
men for the position of captain Halll
gan, Howard and Deck. One of this
trio will undoubtedly be elected to fill
the vacancy caused by the dlsquali
flcation of Towle The thirteen letter
men who will bo entitled to a vote on
the captaincy are: Howard, Halligan,
Ross, Thompson, Cameron, Abbott,
Mastin, Rutherford, Beck, Purd,
Towle, Balis, and Elwell.
COMMANDANT ANNOUNCES
COMPANYT OFFICERS
Don Wood Will Captain the New
Squad All Working Hard for
First Place.
Lieutenant Bowman announced the
officers of the new Company II last
night.
Captain Don Wood.
First Lieutenant R M Higgins.
Second Lieutenant
First Sergeant F. C. Alberts.
The officers have taken charge of
their company and' have commenced
work with a vim. The company, al
though composed of entirely new men,
has entered into the spirit of the race
for first place and is expected to make
a good Bhowing at the annual compet.
All the officers are experienced men
and are working hard to put their
company Into form. The other officers
of the company will be announced
later.
A girl was recently requested to
leave school because her mode of dress
was far in excess of the prevailing low
cuts In women's apparel.
Li 'lmmWM
(CopyrlKht )
JUNIOR CLASS PLAY
TO BE GIVEN MARCH 6
Cast Composed of Excellent Dramatic
Material Exchange Tickets
at Oliver.
"The Man from Home," the choice
of the junior a for their class play this
year, promises to be one of the best
class plays over given at the Univer
sity. This play, in which William
Hodges scored his phenomenal suc
cesses, Is strictly American In every
sense of the word, dealing as It does
with the adventures of an American
girl abroad who Is saved from marry
Ing a fortune hunter of title by the
timely arrival of the man from home,
Daniel Voorhees Pike of Kokomo, In
diana.
The junior class is particularly for
tunate In having among its members
a great deal ol first-rate dramatic ma
terial Nearly every member of the
cast has been prominent in University
dramatics. Although they have chosen
a modern play on which large royal
ties have to be paid, they are never
theless sparing no expense In the way
of settings to make this one of the
big dramatic offerings of the Univer
sit year.
Ralph Northrup, business manager,
has prepared a fifty-cent ticket to bo
sold on the campus, on and after Sat
urday, February 28. These may be
purchased from almost any Junior.
People not holding these exchange
tickets will not be able to obtain res
ervations until the following Monday.
The cast of the play is as follows:
Daniel Voorhees Pike, of Kokomo,
Indiana Cloyd Stewart
Ethel Granger-Simpson. .Ella Williams
The Grand Duke Vaslli Vasilivltch
Frank Kruse
ComtesBO De Cbampigny. .Essie Jones
The lion Almeric St. Aubyn
Louis Home
Lady Creech Ethel Hills
Ivanoff Fred Babcock
(Continued on page 8)
HIPP LANSAREDU
T
MILITARY BIVOUAC PLANS SUB
MITTED TO REGENT8.
PROPOSED FOR LAST WEEK
Exams Will Be Taken Week Previous
if Board Approves of the Plans
to Avoid Interference No
More Night Marches.
Military encampment plans have
been definitely agreed upon. The
proposition as it will bo submitted to
the Board of Regents for tholr action
has taken concrete Bhape. In the
meanwhile the officers are busy cir
culating their petitions among the
"soldier boys " Every effort is being
(Continued on Page 4)
EIGHTY-FIVE ATTEND
TBI DELTA BANQUET
Annual Meeting of the Alumni and
Active Chapter Proves Successful.
Eighty-five members of the Delta
Delta Delta sorority met at the Lincoln
hotel Saturday evening for their an
nual banquet. A number of out-of-town
guests were present. Clara,
Anna and "Marie Hermanson, Esther
Van Oradale, Eleanor DIckman of
Omaha, Rita Thomas of Nebraska City,
Mary Howard of Columbus, Alice Gait
of Platte Center, Nell Peterson of Au
rora, Louise Mote and Maude Flock of
Plainvlew wer among the number.
"Ye Chroniclers."
"Ye Chroniclers," the honorary jour
nalistic society of the University an
nounces the following pledges:
P. Craig Spencer. Omaha.
William M. Locke, Stanton.
Marcus L. Poteet, Pawnee City.
Harold J. 8chwab, McCook.
TRAINING SCHOOL AT NE
BRASKA ENJOYS DISTINCTION
Professor Briggs of Columbia Univer
sity Visits Nebraska Train
ing Schools.
Thomas H. Briggs, professor of sec
ondary education in Columbia Univer
sity, Bpent all of last Friday Btudylng
the methods of instruction and admin
istration In the Teachers College High
School.
Professor Briggs Is the second rep
resentative of Columbia University
who has made a close Btudy of the
work of the Teachers College here in
the training of teachers. Dean Russell
made an extended visit two years ago
Professor Briggs claims this Is the
only training school of the kind on
this continent. Columbia University
has two complete school systems un
der its ownership and control The
first is the Horraco Mann School,
which gives the full twelve grades of
work, with an enrollment of twelve
hundred elementary and high school
pupils. It is maintained for observa
tion and demonstration purposes only
The second is the Speyer School, which
has about five hundred pupils It is
an experimentation school, whore new
theories in education are tried out.
In each of these two schools only tho
most export teachers are employed at
very high salaries Columbia gives
very little actual training to teachers.
Professor Briggs says that Nebraska
has made a distinct step in advance
of any other college or university In
that the prospective teachers are
given classes and made to work out a
practical application of educational su
pervision. He expressed surprise at
the splendid technique already Bhown
by the teachers in training this semes
ter.
The state universities of adjoining
states have made a first hand study of
our demonstration school through rep
resentatives sent here a year ago.
Iowa, Minnesota, North. Dakota and
PASCAL ONLY C0RNHU8KER TO
SCORE AQAIN8T IOWA.
IOWA HAS NIFTY WRESTLERS
Grapplers From Hawkoye State Take
Wrestling Match From Nebraska
With Ease 8eeft to Avenge
Football Disaster.
Nebraska s wrestling ambitions re
ceived a cold water showor Saturday
night The Iowa wrostlors were
among us Very much so, to bo truth
ful Theie were five events. Tho first
numhei w ,i s leTw oe n H I n m ah 6T IoWa
and Pascal of Nebraska. Both mon
worked hard Pascal was bohlnd "Mr.
Iowa" most of tho time. To reward
him for his ombitlon to properly en
tertain the Iowa gent he was glvon tho
event at the end of ten minutes of
festivities This was Nebraska's only
win The rest of this article Is an
elaboration of too much "Hawkeye "
Gran of Iowa and Ganz of Nobraska
put on the second event. Both mon
showed streaks of cleverness Gran
will be remembered as having ap
peared at Nebraska aB a lightweight
in 1912 After ton minutes without a
fall, the refeiee grantod a flvo-mlnuto
respite After tho short rest both men
pitched in Gran showed his skill and
In less than two minutes had .pinned
the Nobraska boy's shoulders to the
mat -This particular event caused tho
only hard feelings of an otherwise
sportsmanlike contest. The Iowa man
denied the charge and the refereo
hacked him up. But to some side-lino
fans who were interested in neither
team and who make their living by
tho wrestling game, the charges
seemed just.
Gunther of Nobraska loBt to Hobbott
in eight mlnutos.
Balis lost to Gllliland in five min
utes GUllland Is tho "clasB" of tho
Iowa team. He Is tho type who uses
his head more than his body. Heady,
fast and strong, he presents a fine
specimen of amateur ability.
Balls, although lasting but a few
(Continued on page 3)
THE ALPHA TAU OMEGA
FORMAL-DISTINCT NOVELTY
Lyceum Singers, Professional Dancers,
Dainty Favors A. T. O. Class
Some Big Event.
The biennial formal of tho Alpha
Tau Omega given at the Lindoll last
Friday night will go down in Nebraska,
society history as one of the classiest
dances ever attended by a student
body. Every detail was a novelty.
New ideas and a complete change of
program were the features which
made the event so popular.
Luncheon, dinner and breakfast
were served during the dancing hours.
A male quartet and a female quintet
furnished music while the guests were
dining. Two professional dancers
were present and gave a fine exhibi
tion of fancy steps. Useful and dainty
favors were distributed. These are a
few of the features which the reporter
caught from an enthusiastic guest
South Dakota are all establishing
schools somewhat similar to oars.
Nebraska gives training to about a
hundred and fifty teachers a year.
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