The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, January 21, 1913, Image 1

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VoLlXIL No. 75
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA, LINCOLN, TUESDAY, JAN. 21, 1913
Price 5 Cents
CAMP TO BE ABANDONED
FRUIT SHOW IS NOW OPEN
CAMPUS NO PLACE FOR MEDICS
CALL OUT JUNIOR ACTORS
UNIVER8ITY SENATE VOTE8 TO
DO AWAY WITH HIKE OF CA
DETS AT MEETING.
MILITARY COURSE ALTERED
Hereafter But Two Hours Drill Will
Be Given During Winter Weeks
64 Hours Credit Will Exempt
One From Drill.
Judging Contest to Start Tomorrow
Kansas, Amca and Nebraska
All Have Teams Entered
FINE DISPLAY OF PRIZE CORN
At u meeting of the University Sen
ate hold lust evening It was decided
to permanently abandon the annual
military camp. This decision came as
the result of an investigation by the
committee on the Correlation of
Courses, consisting of Professors Fosa
ler, Chatburn, Wolcott, Bruner, and
Engberg, and is concurred in by Com
mandant Bowman. The "course of
hours has also been changed by the
action of the Senate, providing for
the division of the year in drill Into
three parts, in the first and third of
which four hours will be given per
week, and in the second, during the
winter months, but two hours will be
given. Other rulings were also made
with regard to credit for drill, settling
the question of upperclassmen enter
ing from other schools without the
drill requirements.
The action thus taken expresses the
opinion of the faculty on one of the
most disputed questions concerning
the students. It will be presented at
the next meeting of the Board of Re
gents for final action, but coming as
It does with the strong recommenda
tion of the faculty it will undoubtedly
meet with the approval of that body.
The clause concerning camp will go
into effect this year; the rest of the
recommendation applies to next year,
taking effect in September.
The report in full, is given below:
Report of Committee.
On the basis of the foregoing report
and on the further basis of a number
of conferences with the Commandant,
Lieutenant Bowman, the committee
makes the following specific recom
mendations and recommends their
adoption by the University Senate:
1. The annual encampment is here
by abandoned permanently.
2. The total number of "hours" of
such required military training shall
uot exceed 216 for the entire period,
of 108 for any one year.
3. The number of hours o, military
exercises (drill) per week la hereby
fixed at (a) from the opening of the
fall semester to November 1st at four
hours per weekf (b) from November
1st to March 15th at two hours per
week; (c) from March 15th to the
" close of school at four hours per week.
. 4. Beginning November 1st, and
ending March 15th, (or during the sec
ond Bemester at the discretion of the
Commandant) of each year, an elec
tive one-hour course In Military Tac
tics shall be open to students of the
The Fruit and Corn Show at the
city Auditorium Is now ready for pub
lic inspection. There is on exhibit a
fine display of Nebraska products, in
cluding several carloads of apples and
a large amount of fine corn. z
A fruit judging contest between Ne
braska, Ames and Kansas will take
place Wednesday. Teams of five men
from each school will compete for a
$250 trophy. The Nebraska team, un
der the coaching of II. E. Marshall
is In fine training and expects to make
a strong bid for first place. The mem
bers of the team are A. II. Beckoff, V.
J. Heine, H. C. Merrick, C. B. Patrick
and H. W. Itlchey.
It Is hoped that the Btudents of tho
University of Nebraska will take an
Interest in the show and In the fruit
Judging contest. It will be of an edu
cational benefit for the students to
see what Nebraska can do In the way
of those products.
Military Department. The general
University regulations as to reglstra
tlan and credit shall apply in the
premises, i. e., the total registration
of the student's work must not exceed
the maximum number of hours al
lowed to bo taken.
5. Unless reprieved or otherwise ex
cused, studentB are held to fulfill tho
military requirements during the first
and second, 1. e., the freshman and
sopohomore years.
6. Any student coming from another
college or university entering the Uni
versity of Nebraska with 32 ad
vanced credits other than military
drill shall be held to satisfy ono year
of the mi'-tary requirements.
Any such student 'frerlig 'A hours
of advanced credit shall be exempt
entirely from nillitt'iy drill.
7. If for any reason whatever any
student is excused from partaking of
the military training ho shall offer
an equivalent number of hours ra
other subjects.
LAURENCE FOSSLER,
Chairman.
G. R. CHATBURN,
R. H. WOLCOTT,
LAWRENCE RBUNER,
C. C. ENGBERO,
Committee on tho Correlation of
Courses.
General Health of Student Body Offers
Little Encouragement To Med
ical Profession.
ONLY ONE SERIOUS ILLNESS
This year stands out in very marked
contrast to last year with reference
to the health of tho student body as
a whole. Thus far very little serioim
Illness among the studentB has been
reported, while last year a sorious
epidemic of typhoid fever, ono of
mumps, and several caseB of smallpox
prevailed over tho campuB.
In fact, but ono case of serious
illness haB been reported to tho Uni
versity authorities this year that of
G. It. Fuller, who Is quarantined on
the third floor of the Sigma Chi houso
with diphtheria. His Bteady Improve
ment has been reported.
Further than this, the list of excuses
which have been turned in shows noth
ing but trivial Illnesses, which, as
many know, are often times quite tri
vial, indeed.
The Tuesday evening vesper ser.
Ice of the Y. W. C. A. will be a
story hour, Miss Alice Sexton being
the story-teller. Association rooms
in tho Temple at 5 o'clock.
All Juniors and Seniors who want
their pictures In the 1913 Cornhusk
er will have the same taken at Town
send's before February 1st. Three
dollars covers the price of the photos
and the cut.
FORMER PERUVIANS BANQUET
80 Students and Members of Faculty
Dined Saturday Night at Lindell
Toa6t University Spirit.
The Peru Club banqueted at tho
Lindell hotel last Friday night. There
were seventy-five or eight present, In
cluding a number of guests. Accord
ing to reports the feast was a huge
success, and reflected much credit on
the president, R. R. Spafford, and
the secretary, G. W. Smith. The
guests of the club were Deans Sher
man, Burnett and Wolcott; ex-State
Superintendent Fowler, and Professor
Brownell, formerly of the Peru fac
ulty. The toast list, presided over by G.
N. Foster, included several of the
University faculty and prominent
members of the Peru Club. The gen
eral treud of the speecheB was at all
times towards University spirit in the
club, and the aim of the Peru Club
In the University Life.
GERMAN CLUB TO MEET.
Election of Officers Scheduled to Fol
low Program.
COMMITTEE ON PLAY 8UDDENLY
ANNOUNCES TRYOUT3 FOR
PLAY ON WEDNE8DAY.
TO DRAMATIZE "NATHAN HALE"
Quick Action Necessary On Part of
Aspirants for Honors of Place
Copies of Manuscript To Be
Had In the Library.
The Deutscher Gesolllger Vereli
will meet Thursday night, January
23, at Miss Reusch's home, 2275 South
Fourteenth street, in the twenty-third
'The following program will be ren
dered
"Still wie die Nacht" Bohm
Miss Eva Pool
"Du hist wle eine Blume" Cantor
Miss Eva Pool
An illustrated talk on Holbein by
Professor Dann.
Election of officers for the coming
semester "will follow the program.
An abrupt announcement has been
made by tho committee in charge of
tho Junior play to tho effect that try
outs for places In tho cast will bo
held Wednesday evening, beginning at
7 o'clock. Tho short space of time
given for preparation is explained by
the fact that tho play 1b to be hold
on February 21st, and it Is desirable
that sufficient time bo allowed for
rohearBals to the successful candi
dates, that the production may como
up to the usual standard of the plays
class.
Is Masterpiece of Clyde Fitch.
"Nathan Hale," by Clyde Fitch, will
be the subject of the theatrical offortB
of the Juniors for this year and will
offer more than ample opportunities
foj the display of all the student tal
ent that irrny bo put forth. The play
Is reputed among competent authority
as being the strongest effort that has
como from the pen of Clyde Fitch. Tho
plot is set in revolutionary times and
deals with a historical character bear
ing tho same name as the play. Tho
story introduces tho hero as a school
teacher of a colonial school with tho
heroine as his pupil. Tho adventures
of Nathan in his resistance to the
loyalists, his volunteering as a Bpy
and his subsequent adventures In tho
British camp form a talo that Is full
of Interest from both a dramatic and
historical viewpoint. The play 1b
complete with strong situations and
tho trial scene In which Nathan is
condemned bb a spy with his Bweet
heart as a witness Is considered one
of the most powerful dramatic situa
tions to be found in dramn.
Nathan Halo was originally enacted
before the public by Nat Goodwin and
Maxine Elliot and is dedicated to
these theatrical celebrities. The largo
royalty paid for the privilege of pro
duction attests to tho general worth
of the play.
Registration Today and Tomorrow.
Copies of tho manuscript are to bo
had at tho reserve desk in tho library.
Registration of candidates for places
will take place in U 106 from 11 to
12 o'clock today and 12 to 1 o'clock
tomorrow. The timo allowed to each
aspirant will be three minutes, with
the privilege of arranging with Miss
Howell for combinations.
The Junior committee In charge of
tho play are: Frank Kruse, chairman,
Harold Dlers, Clarence Clark, Alma
Plasters, Clara Janouch and Gertrude
Scrlbner.
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