The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, April 05, 1911, Image 1

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Vol. X. No. 119
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA, LINCOLN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5, 1911.
Price 5 Cents.
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AGRICULTURAL STUDENTS
RETURN TO THE FARM
INVESTIGATION BY DEAN BUR
NETT REVEALS DATA.
MANY WOMEN ARE- IN DOUBT
Out of 171 Reporting, 138 Came from
Rural Homes and 150 Expect
to Return.
A recent inquiry by Dean Burnett
of the agricultural college into the in
tended occupation of the students of
this college upon finishing school hns
brought out tht fact that at least 75
per cent of the men enrolled in agri
culture will return to the farm, while
a few will teach. Most of the forestry
students will enter the United States
forest service.
The registration fo'r the first sem
ester of the current year was 2;i0,
against lll total for the year previous.
Out of the 230 inquiries sent out, 125
men replied as follows: SlxtyPnlne
came from the farm. Seventy-eight ex
pect to return to the land to follow
some branch of farming. Twenty-two
expect to tench some line of agricul
ture or do experiment station work.
w.oatyjLUu&eorejtry stiidents. will
United
return to fnrm life. Two hope to
enter the college of agriculture. Or
171 men and women reporting, 138
came from farms and 150 expect to go
To the farm upon leavlhtfirehdol
it is doubtful if any technical
school can show a lnrger percentage
of its students who expect to follow
the vocation for which their school life
has specially trained them.
LIFE WORK SERIES TONIGHT.
the
States foest ser-
Professor May Will Deliver Lecture at
the Y. M. C. A.
The flrBt meeting of the life wdrk
scries outlined by the Y. M. C. A. will
be addressed by Professor May of the
Lincoln high Echool. Mr. May is a
man of wide experience and will give
an interesting discussion of the topic,
"Tht Advantages of the Teaching Pro
fession." No student should decide to
enter this field of great opportunity
without realizing the scope and possi
bilities of helpfulness in it. A Chris
tian teacher has an opportunity which
is not exceeded by any other public
servant in the community, not even
the minister.
The next of the series will be April
2(5, when Dr. Poynter will spealc on
"The Temptations of the Modern
Physician."
MUMPS FOR 8MALLP.OX.
enter
vice.
Women in Doubt.
Of the fifty-twq women who have
replied, nine came from the farm,
while forty-three did not. Thirty-five
expect to teach, while fifteen do not.
Four expect to return to the farm; fif
teen do not. The others did not reply
to this question.
While it has been known from pre
vious Inquiries that practically all of
the students of the school of agricul
ture return to the land, It has been
thought, even by the university author
ities themselves, that a considerable
proportion of the Btudents In tlio col-
, lege did not expect to go back to the
farm on graduation. The college of
agriculture under this namo has been
in operntlon less than two years and
the subject has never boforo been in
vestigated with the idea of determin
ing what the intentions of the stu
dents might be. This report indicates
clearly that the agricultural courses
are taken only by those students who
expect to make gome technical use of
the knowledge acquired In school. U
is apparent that young men who do
not have some definite purpose In fol
lowing agriculture enter other col
leges. It is thougKt by the professors
In charge or the college of agriculture
that when the advantages of this col
lego are beter known to the student
body a much larger number of stu
dent will register In Its courses. The
fact that the registration for the cur
rent year exceeds that of the last .year
by 114 students, or an Increase of prac
tically 100 per cent, Indicates that the
growth of the college of agriculture
will continue until its attendance com
pares more favorably with the other
technical colleges of the university.
More Go Back to Farm.
The sctiooT of -agriculture, 1 order
to canvass this .same question thor
oughly with the students, also sent a
clrcujar letter out to them, making In
quiry along the same lines. Of the
ins-menwhflrpned, lib came ironi
JfXMJAMJPRACTICINO
NEBRASKA TO SEND THREE MEN
TO INTERCOLLEGIATE
MEET.
In anticipation of the annual inter
collegiate gymnastic meet, to be held
nt Chicago university on the twenty
second of this month, the varsity gym
nastic team is working out every day,
including night work on Tuesdays,
Thursdays and Saturdays. The team
is strong this year, two of the men be
ing former "N" men who have every
opportunity to make a good showing
aC Chicago. Only three representatives
will be sent, to thta meet, Trump, To
biska and Weaver, although the regu
lations permit of four representatives
from each school. Morehouse of Ne
braska might be eligible for the team
if ho kept in training, but from the
present Indications he will not be in
shape.
In addition to the gymnastic team
a wrestling and a fencing team wlU
also represent the Cornhuskers in this
ovenf. "The members: of these teams
have not been definitely selected. El
liott as heavyweight wrestler Is not el
igible for the meet, and there Is some
probability that the school will not
send a middle-weight man. The fenc-erfr-are
working out dally and have
good prospects of making good in the
Chicago event.
Howard Gullfoll Enjoys Freedom but
.Threepays.
We are now able to bolTevc the
proverb which says that troubles
never come singly. In fact It might
be said of them, as is declared of prim
itive man, that they are gregarious.
Such has proven true in the caso of
Howard Gullfoll. Acquitted on the
cTiargo of smallpox, ho was released
from the pest house a week ago "Satur
day. He had enjoyed IiIb freedom
from pestilence but three days, when
he was stricken with that moBt potent
of beauty-destroying ailments, the
mumps. At present he is convalescing
much ngainst his will for with an in
duced fatalism, as the result of his
misadventures, the patient sees before
him the complete list of colnngioiiB
maladies.
JUDGE TIBBET8 SPEAKS.
DRAMATIC CLUB CAST
FINISHING IIS" WORK
"CHRISTOPHER JUNIOR" WILL BE
READY 8ATURDAY.
CAST INCLUDES STROM MEMBERS
Byrne Marcellus Will Appear In Lead-
Ing Role With Mildred Bevlns
In Feminine Title.
Addresses Law Students on Subject
of Gaining a Practice.
Judge A. S. Tibbots spoke before u
large gathering of law studentB in
U309 last night. He took as the sub
ject of his address, "Getting a Prac
tice." Selecting a location was an im
portant thing and one which worried
the young lawyer considerable. The
advantages and disadvantages of a
small toyvnas compared to thoee or a
Iare" city we?e7aIenH7pn"detji1r- ry
Judge Tibbets.
Advertising, he declared, was barred
by professional ethics for many good
reasons and an extensive practice can
only be had after long experience. The
lawyer must depend on the world find
ing him through the quality of his
work. If he is successful in a case,
other clients will entrust their busi
ness to him. The question of fees to
bo charged for professional service
was also considered. Judge Tibbets
told many incidents of his long experi
ence which tended to make his point
clear and the addreBB Interesting. Mr.
Tibbets is one of the regular lecturers
of the law school on ethics.
EXPERIMENTAL DISPLAY BRILLIANT
DR. BENTON DALE'S LECTURE ON
"THERMITE" INTERESTING
AND SPECTACULAR.
A WELL BALANCED COURSE
o.wi 108 vein return to the farm. Ot
k the 23 who did not come rrom rnrm,
ri'.f. G did not expect to go upon land. Only
v no !, in oritur. tlio college of agri
culture. Of the ,33 -women students re
porting, 23 came from and 22 expect to
PROFESSOR G. W. A. LUCKEY
GIVES USEFUL HINT8 IN
HI8 ADDRE88.
The finishing touches are being put
on "Christopher Junior," the play
which the Dramatic club will rrosont
at the Temple theater Saturday night.
The cast has been working for several
weekB and will be able to give a fin
ished production Saturday night.
The play is ropleto with funny situ
ations and Is bound to please.
The east, which includes somo of
the strangest members of tho club, is
as follows:
Christopher Jedbury, Junior
Uyrno Marcollua
Christopher Jedbury, Senior
S. P. Dobbs
Major Hedway C. P. Radcllffo
Tom Bellaby Harry Hathawey
Mr. Simpson W. D. Bates
Job Verne Giddlngs
Whimper V. L. Hosb
Mr. Gllbb M. O. Bates
Neirierr7J7T777r.TTT-rKntherine-Wttlis-
Mrs. Jedbury Alpha Warton
Mrs. Glibb ...Mrs. Staslney
Dora Hedway Mildred Bevlns
CAN PAY IF T.HEY W8H.
Prof, G. "W, A. "Luckey spoke at con
vocation this morning on the subject
"A Well Balanced Course." The ad
dress was tht one he delivered before
tho great gathering of teachers nt
Memphis, Tenn., tecently, and which
wnseryfnyorably-crltldsedJ)yinflnx
leading educators mere, rroiessor
Luckey gave a great many valuable
suggestions for the student in the se
lection of a course which would best
lit him for future work.
At an open meeting of Sigma XI,
held last night In Chemistry hall, Dr.
Benton Dales lectured on "Thermite."
A fairly good sized audience was pres
ent to hear the explanations and en
joy the spectacular experiments. It
was a brilliantly Illustrated lecture.
The bright light, caused by the
burning of the thermite in the experi
ments, was harder on the eyes than
that of a high power calcium light. In
one of the prettiest of the experiments
three bricks were set upon an iron
plate which hod previously been set
upon brick supports. The three bricks
were set so as to form, a well Into
which cinder thermite was poured. By1
means of a magnesium rlGbon fuse the
thermite was heated and the result
was of the the Vesuvius or Mt. Peleo
variety, sparks falling about on the
desk. It. was sovbllnding that Profes
sor Dales was forced to put on blue
glass goggles during tjio experiment.
The heat from tho burnIhguierlMter4B
so great that the solids were melted.
Experiments were tried with the vari
ous Hinds of thermite and all were
brilliantly beautiful.
Publication Board Hands Down Favor
able Decision.
A decision by tho students' publica
tion board to the effect that cadets
need not pay for space nllottedto them
in tho 1011 Cornhuskor unless they eo
desired, was made public Tuesday. Tho
grounds upon which tho decision is
based are That drill is1 compulsory and
the cadet companies are not on tho
same basis as sororltleB, fraternities
and other clubs and societies of tho
university. This means that fees paid
in the military department need only
be paid at the dcBire of the cadets. It
has been the custom during the past
to grant a page to each company,
which was paid for by a tax on tho
individual members. Heretofore the
payment haB been of a compulsory
nnture.
"THE 80PHOMORE" WEDNESDAY.
Will
Senior Class of Temple High
Stage Production April 12.
On Wednesday evening, April 12,1
the senior class of the Temple high, .
school will present "Tho Sophomore
under the personal direction of MIsb
Alpha Warton, a prominent member
of tho university Dramatic club. Re
hearsals have heen held for some time
and the play Is rounding Into good
shape. Al Coleman will play the lead
ing part, while MIbs Clara Hill will nr
pear in tlio principal feminine role.
Both are well fitted for the characters
they portray.
Others who will take part are:
MIbscb Benz and Mary Humphreys -as
old ladles , and Ruth Malone as an
Irish maid; James Gaju'sha as a profes
sor, Edward Petla as the football cap
tain, George Swingle as coach, and Ed--ward-Stoekfeldt-aB;
an enthusiastic,
BODhomore. "The Sophomore" Is a
college play fuirof.gdod comedy and
displaying much college spirit and enthusiasm.
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