The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, March 06, 1909, Image 1

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No. 10ia
vgUNERSITY OF EBRASKA, LINCOLN, SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 1909.
Price 5 Cent
SCIENCE TO CONQUER
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I be Sailv 1ft ebr aefean 1
HONORS TO KANSAS
QET8 CHAMPIONSHIP OP IAV
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WARD GIVE8 AN
E8TINQ TALK.
INTER.
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STEADILY OVERCOMING DISEASE
BETTER KNOWLEDGE OF CAU8E8
GIVE8 BA8I8 FOR HOPE.
Germ Diseases, Which Are Respons-
9
r lbe for a .'Large'Rortlon of Deaths,
- est 'Combated by Sani
tary, Living.
M, T
V.
, A very small audience greeted Dr.
Ward of the school of medicine to
listen totals very interesting locturo
on "The History and Geography- of
Disease" In the latter .part of hlB
address Dr. Ward used the lantern
to Mlluktrato -1 some of the striking
tacts' relative to disease and its opor
to atlon. - In the course of the locturo
Dr Ward said: " '
I -,
"Disease is any digression from the
normal bodily condition. From' very
early tlmo jnodlcal men know the
symptoms and signs of many of the
diseases now known, but there is one
difference now, and that lis that, we
,-Kave. learned the causes of diseases
aad can therefore1 combat them much
more;" effectively. . In many of the
tribes medicine men could satisfy
ijfliehtaand prescribe aaeorrtlBg;
.lie vthelr primitive knowledge. r Any
great natural disaster was, thought
tfr be "the working of .the wrath of
the Deity. , , . ."',
'Modern -modlclrie has made' Its
great adavancefrn the Increased know
ledge of causes. Many of pur 'most
serious aliments can
iave tneir
chusbg spread 'button a bit of 'giaBB;
-Qxaminedunder powerful microscopes
and. the same: germs can bo cultivated
undeV "faywabio conditions so that' its
round of life can be studied. In this
way we get definitely at the character
of the,' causes 'and with this kriowl-
edge" can take certain steps to "eradicate-the
-trouble or at least reduce
its dangers. Science therefore has
done much for medicine.
"Diseases due to physical reasons,.
such as broken limbs and wounds,
are liable to occur anywhere and
so have no geographical features.
However, this 1b not the case In germ
diseases. A great per cent of the
deaths are due to germs and the lo
calities where they work, .the 'most
can bo, easily ascertained. There are
natural limits to diseases of this kind,
and they; spread most rapidly and
most surely between "those countries
which hayo an extensive commerce.
Close commercial relations are very
often the moans of k communicating
some of our most terrible maladies;
With primitive peoples', where Bani
- tary measures and -personal ..hygiene
receive little attention and medical
attention 1b veryv poor, an epidemic
Will sweep off hosts; and the cause
may 4e traced very often to the care
lessness of pno individual. The dan
ger and proliflty of diseases is greatly
lessoned by personal cleanliness and
particularly in the care of the' hands
and nagis. There is also an economic,
side to this problem, and our health,
can be greatly protected by the use
of pure water screens and many other
protective means. ' ,
''It is probable thta malaria caused
the downfall of Greece and, Rose. The
original siroag, vigprpus men of those
nations lessened in strength and
made them easily succumb to the ray
.ages of the malaria and become a
prey to it tn oar present state of
civilization the, government ageacies
are, directed against many tome of
siiekdlseeM.aad .iaTtavor ot, ojww.
DEAN
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rfc
"EVENTS Of
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, "Tuberculosis, 'sl unnecessary, and
yet in Nebraska, with -a 'climate
about as .unfavorable as can be, from
600 to 700 die annually. Typhoid fevec
is-unnecesBary and yetbnekaCseld
that -when a -man dles-of this disease-
somoono should be hung for murder."
Irijconcluding his address DrV Ward
presented many diagrams of 'much Jn
terest, snowing tno "History and Ge
ography of Disease." The two lead-
lng causes Pf death aro germ diseases
-rtuberculosls and pneumonia, and 20
per -cent of the deaths.. are due to
therii. The classes of people most li
able, according to present knowledge,
to tuberculosis are laborers- and cler
ical men. In Africa the terrible
Bleeping sickness kills, millions of
British subjects. It is spread by trade
and is always fatal. Malaria is a con
stant menace to Rome. The lowlands
ue'arby are excellent places for It to
breed. It Is said that in this, region
100,000 die annually. The, center of
the cholera is ,in northeast India, and
spreads thrqugh the channels of trade.
The great epidemic or Pandemic 'of
lnfluonza whioh swopt around , tho
world in the year 1889 was one of
the most remarkable known because
of Its regularity of development In
New York City of 100,000 school chil
dren inspected, sixty per cent needed
medical" attention T and ' forty per cent
needed dental attention. '
The average death rate of ohildren
has decreased steadily because of
greater care from 189.1 to 1903. Meas
les were in their most serious form
in 1882., Consumption is apparently
lessvfatal in married people than in
single. In our American cities Wash
ington has the highest death rate due
to typhoid fever, being exceeded only
by Cairo and Alexandria of Egypt
Hydrophobia has decreased very
greatly since, England began controll
ing stray 'dogs. One of the most sig
nificant, facts is the effect of vaccina
tion, upon, smallpox. In Prussia the
number, of deaths, per, thoaai before
it "was corapwkcrywM twety-for,
and a half and afterward it was re
duced, to, cmeaadV halt ,
.Baked
Ad served Utwk:
eread; let, at Tfce
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THE WEEK-AS SEEN BY TH
MEET IS POSTPONED
INTEfW:LA88-AFFAIR-NOT -TO. OC
COR' OnTIL MARCH 20.
EVENTS ADDED TO PROGRAM
A
The Tug of " War, Obstacle-race arid
ji Hand-balance Race, Will Be. Made
the Special Features of.,
the Evenjng.
Tho intpr-class athletic moot has
been postponed r until the. 20th of
March. This had to bo done on ac
count of the fact that the sophomore
'freshman inter-class debate was
! scheduled for the .'.date'-originally-chosen;
and it was felt that neither
'.event would be a' success, if they were
both Held on the same, evening;
-The meet will be given in the uni
versity gymnasium and , an informal J
dance .will bo given afterward. The
list of events, which with a few ex
ceptions will Jbo the same as that, of
charter' day, is as follows: v 25-yard
dash, relay races, pole vault, high
Jump, fence vault, rope elimb, shot
put, and, high kick. In the 25-yard
dash there will be three entries to
the class; 'in all; the other events,
'excepting the team races, two entries
,will be permitted.
New Events Added.
; In addition to -these events three
others have been added; namely, the
tugof-war, and bbstanco and hand
balance races. The last two events
are calculated, to give as much fun
to the participants as to the specta
tors. ' In the obstacle race the men
will not be allowed to know before
hand what is coming. The aad-bal-ance
rac is fo 'b a wniejw' affair,
and. wii; be i rather a coatest of skill
than of atliletle, ability. J . ;
This eTemtwlll not be, included. Im
coaaUag poiats for wiping the ('
plpsWaHhogs,' riftedals wl hi
$lJWm FlimiH. ;d tliefotfcer
freirtB,(etet yrm he awarded ai'Jei-'
CARTOONIST"
ilpws; 10;" -"and,-2v-'onteam";racesfr
5, 3 and 1 on all other events. '
At the dancer to be held' after, the
smoet an. admission of 25' cents addi
tional per couple wlllbe charged. As
the original admission is25 corits a
ticket this makes the price of ad
mission 76 cents a couple for the
.whole evening. r-
THE- INTER-CLAS8 DEBATE MEN
Judgesf and' Chairmen for Talk-fests
, v Are 8elected.
At a mooting yesterday afternoon
the inter-class debating committee
selected Judges and chairmen for thd
Inter-class debates which are to occur
next week.
- Professor Fogg-will preside 'at the
frcshman-sophomorb debate March 13.
Tbe. Judges atthls contest will be
Professor Ford, Alva C. Hough, and
W.: B; Rose, Mr. 'Hough is a uni
versity graduate and a' practicing at-.
torney in Lincoln. W B. R,pse" is one
of tho recently appointed Judges of
the state supremo, court
.At tho senior-Junior debate, Dean
H. B. Ward will preside. The Judges
Will be Professor Caldwell, Roscoe
Ozman. and L. C. Oberlles, The two
latter are Lincoln citizens and uni
versity grads. This debate -will be
held aext Friday, March 12.
The. debates are expected to draw
a good crowd of students iatereeted
in the success of their respective
classes. They will be. held la Me
morial hall on the dates asove gives,
and every, effort is belag. awule to
make 'the argumeata ilateiting to
the public as well as to the jadges.
The subject for both .deaates Is.
"QlinMl ilu tt.ij cti-t. 'm . .
UWU.H kMO um awuM aaopt a
parcels post?" ,' "
NOTICEI
On account' a laraa aaMker'of
stadaats wjb' were aaaWe to" aaroaaae
flttaiK 'wa .Ian1' .mI iL ' ki.-l
.
. v ,.,,: wm wowiiaiaa
sa.nle, wday.
Femv last
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KET 1ALL LEAGUE. -
WINSSECONDOAMEBY 24 TO 15 '
CORNHU8KER8 LEAD IN FIR1T
HALF BY 8 TO 7 SCORE.
Nebraska Five Loses Out During the
second Half When Ossenents
Make Five Field poalsJn
8hort Time. ""
r
Tho Kansas basket ball five an
nexed tho tltlo to the champIoHshla
of tho Missouri valloy conference bas
ket ball loaguo last night at Kassas,
City1, Kans., by winning tho second '
of 'the final series from .the corn
huskorB by a scoro of 24 to 16. The
gamo was tho best exhibition the two '
toamB have, put up this, winter. ;
Nobraska- outplayed its rival in,
evory department, of the game, except
ing goal tossing. There the corn -buskers
were weak, and because of ,
this fault lost tho game, la both
halvps they had many shots at goals- '
which they wore unsuccessful In at
tempting to throw.
The first half of the game ended,
with Nebraska in tho. lead by one
point. During;, the second: halt'vthe, .
cornhuskers continued to, keep, ahead.
of their opponents until .the last tea
minutes when the, Kansas v.flra by
a. ''remarkabler' apart? foiseWaaaadW
Johnson , throwing, five . field goak.
"''Pony? Wood -aad Captaia .WaIVv
nfavflrt arnnA halt tni tta rwlmitiLmiaair
m ' D T " ' T5W"T """'
Perry's .guarding of Johnsoa was; ex. ?
collent- and prevented- the' big -Jay-
hawker forward from making several
points, ... !
. The samo teams will play again, to-"
night The cornhuskers wilt retura
to Lincoln Sunday. '
Played Good all. v
The report of the' basket ball game' -between
the cornhuskers1 aad Kansas,
at Kansas, City on Thursday night;
shqwed that the Nebraska lye-fat up,
a mighty good game, aad bat, for a'r
little hkrd luck would aaya woa'.. As!
it was the cornhaikers; 'thvear iabre
goals from, field thaa 'ttw4rj;efon-
ents. ,.-..' - . f- i
;Tho inability1 of Captain Walsh tol
convert, the oulscalled on lfjuasaa?
Into, goals kept the cornhuskers from,
tying their opponents. The TJebrjurka -players
.excelled the Javtewlsers in
both team work aad guareftafcr bat
lost out on goal: towing; If they rem
odlod this fault by last night Ay
ought to have won the1 second game. ;
The small crowds which wMaaesed r.
the games on Thursday aad FrMay
nights proved that for naaasad; rea. ,
sons it probably would have' aeea as
well to have held: pae 'fame In eaeh
Liacoln and Lawreace. "There prob
ably would have beeaas muchasoney
made by that arrangeaseat aa by the ,
plan that was adopted. That); top, a
game In Lincoln would havr ft ven. the'
local students a chance to 'see. their
men, in action' in the .eaaaVetoaship
series, a treat that the; nolaiag ef the V
games in Kaasas City deaitd then.
1 Juniors Ara qhampjena. "v
la tho fiaal series of giSisea-ifc the
later-class basket ball series at the;
Armory yesterday; aheciooaV taa iaa-'
iors'wo ta.eaamlcalip by defeat
lag the wpfcoWea v'd& Tfca
rae' was slow, beta Uasaa 'aaar
eajjly heiar fca noorraftaat eoadl
tkJa: Tne saverlor team wackaf aha.
jtHuors waa.wo; maoa ror seeeac year"
sH
hpwarar, and' tlier
raa aa a.aeoraVM.tlMrirat'aaa?;
IT o I. The seeead haJC
was
:s
Hyde i4ac la at
sB'Sbj wa vasaa
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