The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, February 20, 1909, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    i'
y'5r ' j"r(t:r;
'Ht jnii' UunriMyiijiiariiMMit i yi i4
ffft;,"i"i?j;;iyS" .'.""sgay 'yy""1
jV'T !WS''W, V, '!IU J
JJ'W.mi'iiUI ;.'fH' i lju' i) ."ri i( .iiiniiDi iwy wii wffgfift.fei;, n, u..t.
t'llWyi)Wl'.uiMll!liil(i."l liHiini)i'i'ii Wjli.ijaiVtiWfc.frWii .n,,
v
''
&'I4'-
1 ri 1 ' -', -; ij i ftf ' i'ft; irj . if jp:
J
.wi
.
i r , &.
."" rtO "'..8'-jr
i
l , i,
Vol. Vm. No. 91.
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA, LINCX)LN, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1909.
i-
t
Pride 5 Cent
. . . . . .i- t
i j
.? :iv I'ji
1
mm W00D00 AGAIN
TH?
WILL CUT. RED TAPE
."'!
i."r'r'.A.i;MAfrt: -r- j-.t -
J' -f . 5 ' . I iT' J . ' I WJ . . '! ,- J ,
- A . ..." L ' "' ' ' " J "'' . , . ' - " ' . ' '
iimw .SBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBSBiSBr skap , - . - . m-jsbbbbbbbbbbbbbbw m . a. .ssiBBBi sssw. -
w " . bbbbbV m ..-.,, w . m- -a v h . k- t -t i
T lg ' lmammtm tamm MMM
. i ' . . .1L. . ,,
'a ,':
H.f 'Jf
v
h" .
f .
t
I
.'
V' 's
1 ?&
.'i. '.
5 'y ':.-''(M
LtfcK MtH 00PHER8 8TILL AND
THjCWIN 28 to 26. .
Wi
)
INNING GOAL IN LAST MINUTE
CORNHU8KER8 LEAD BY 16 TO 10
f ' 8C0RE1N FIR8T HALF:
Game Looked1 Like Nebraska's Until
. Final ,F.I,ve Minutes, When North-
,'ernera Tie 8 core and Toss
t " ' the Last Field Goal, '
Minnesota 28; Nebraska 26.
' Witt th'o game apparently safqly
stowed away tho Cornhuslcor baskot
ball tosBors last evening slowed up
in their work during tho closing mln
utos of play and allowed tho Mlnno
Bota quintet to win out by a score
of 28 to 26. At the close of the first
half tho scoro stood 16 to 10 In favor
of Nebraska. Tho winning goal was
made in tho last half of play.
Tho removal of Wood, loft forward,
fronl the game In tho. early part of the
second half and tho failure of the Ne
braska guards to watch Anderson, who
was substituted for Moncke on tho
Minnesota team, lost the game for the
Cornhuskers.
; During tho initial session and for
the few minutes of the second half
that -he was in tho Nebraska line-up
the colored' lad played a fast game and
-was an important factor in keeping
his Ave in the lead. His team work
was the best he has displayed this
season. Ho prevented the gophers
from making several points in the
opening round.
When the Gophers Won.
Tho colored lad was taken out of
tho contest in the second half when
the cornhuskers .seemed to bo far
enough ahead to warrant such a move
on the part of tho coach. At' that
ors' flvo played a fast and rough
game. He scored seven field goals
and tossed four baskets from fouls.
Ho was In tho game every minute and
kept his opponents constantly on the
go.
Andorson, at guard, was a whirlwind
player, and undoubtedly to him the
time tho score stood 22 to 14 in favor gophers are Indebted for their victory.
. of Nebraska. Wattors was substituted
for Woods and did some good work in
advancing, with tho ball and in break
ing' up the Minnesota plays. Ho lacked
however, tho keen Judgment of the
man whoso place he was filling, and
the gophers soon piled up enough
points to make their approach dan
gorouB. Schmidt' replaced Walters for the
last few minutes of the contest but his
fresh and aggressive play was not
onougE to stave off the hoodoo which
seems to hover, over the cornhuBkers
every time they meet the MInnesotans
In basket-ball.
Even with tho weakness at left, for
ward on the cornhu'sker five", the local
team might yet havo won ,had Ander
son, Minnesota's right guard, been
more closely followed, after ho had.
gone into tho gamo to relieve Krutch
ko. Ho ran away from his Nebraska
opponents .several times and his free
dom allowed .him on two occasion's to
toss field goals that gave ho gophers
four points they never should 'have
been allowed to'take. ' - (" -
' ., , Very' Rjjugh, Play.
The game was, probably the, rough
est exhibition of basket-ball that has
been 'seen on the armory floor, this
season. Minnesota has the "science"
of fouling without being1 caught by tho
.officials down pat The visiting play
Wa1 are by far the roughest seen
Mgalhsi' the -cornhuskers.. ji here this
,jwli$erj The men who played against
Gajptaln Walsh; repeatedly fouled him,
and in the closing minutes of ;the con
tost, Awhen the northerners were roll
ing ip ''points, the Nebraska captain's
hands f-Were hold practically all th,e
tlmoand in order, to have tossed
goals fiaaust ned have a flying ma
chine. ;KrHthkef right, guard, was put
.out of the gamejkter he had fouled
Captain Walsh flv.UmeB, x
Hansen, le'fi f9rwaiid,r'-,on the -visit-.
"EVENTS Of THE WEEK AS 5EEN BY THE CARTOONIST"
lamp m-Y8
oJ rM r
J3& r (charter pay rxcftciaes r
m 3-mg -f
rT 1L S'
Ttl'K7 "N.,', iWMTIOM PAV5
r.;
.HS
THE CHILD AND STATE
,ili'
itte-
PRE8JDENT HILU8.OF SENIORS A
. -REFpRM EXECUTIVE.,
4. y .h
XL.
SINECURES TO BE ABOLISHED
NO I.VY DAY ORATOR COMMITTEE
TO BE (APPOINTED.
Useless Watte of Honor and 'feffprt
Wlil Be Eliminated by NeW Pretl-
dent of Fourth Year Men
by Direct Appointment."
.I'.rvi
T.t .-
DR. M'CLANAHAN DI8CU88E8 RE.
LATION OF THE TWO.
He. broke up many of tho cornhusker
plays and scored tho field goals that
gave the gophers the game.
Use Nine Players,
The Minnesota coach used nine play
ers in winning tho contest. Shortly
before the close of the first half ho re
placed. JVIencke at center with Walker.
During the last session three other
fresh men were allowed to enter the
line-up.
Nebraska used eight men In playing
the gome. Watters and Schmidt were
substituted for Wood. Ingersoll play
ed the first half at left forward' and
Perry took tho position In-the second
round.
During, tho intermission between
halves,, tho Nebraska gymnastic team.
amused, the large crowd with acts "on
the parallel bars.
Tho same teams will play again to
night in the armory, X basket-ball in
formal will follow the game. ' Admis
sion for both tho hop ,and the; game
will be fifty centb. ' x , ' '
The line-up: ,
Nebraska. . Minnesota, I
WalBh .rf . ;Y. rr. Anderson,
Wood, WatterB, - pattersn
Schmidt ....... .If.. HansOn
Petrashek ....... c. . Mencke, Walker
Boll . . .r.,. , ., . . . . .rg .Krutchke.
'-? ' - - ,' ' l iAnderaon;
Ingersoll, Perry,. .lgr. ..,.... Qiltman;
r ' - -' i ' : "- 5. W Bianthetto'
Goals fom field: -Walsh, 4; Wood,
2; Petrashok, 2; Bell, 1; Perry, iy
Anderson, 1; Hansen, 7; Krutchko,. 1;
Anderson, 2; Giltman,' 1. Goals from
ts
fouls;. Walsh, 4; Hansen, 4. Referee:
Hewitt, exNebra'skan;
venger, ox-Indiana.
Umpire, Cle-
The best oyster' stew in the oir
!g that served at The Bofton Lnnek.
Try'.lt: Zr&i∓ '
BETTER LAWS MUST SOON COME
8ense of Responsibility for Life of
Children Must Come to Prevent
Much -of Present Ini- '
morality, '
Tho first of tho new series of 5
o'clock medical convocations took
place yesterday afternoon In tle Tem
ple theater. Dr. H. M. McClanahan of
Omaha was tho speaker of tho after
noon, and although his talk was not
at all technical in its nature It was
listened to largely, by medical stu
dents. Dr. ' McClanahan emphasized
the many .forces that were destroying
so many of tho children and, incapaci
tating others throughput their y lives,
making 'thorn not, only a. burden to
themselves but to 'tho state as well,
and detracting from their yalue as. citi
zens. Dr. McClanahan spoke in part
as follows: t k -,
"The general diffusion' of knowledge
is very groat, and is spread, by' many
agencies. In a political campaign
every speaker tells, us of the tariff and
anyone may know something of it
Bu of the early Hfo of the child it
la' different' "A very large per r cent
of. the children are of foreign-born,
very undesirable places. The infant
mortality is very large although it
may; now he decreasing somewhat
Necessary for Nation. ,
"The normal growth and develop
ment of the child is! naceasary for the
normal growth and stability of the na
tion, The child must he well born.
It -should not bo required to exist 'as
an abnormal lndlyidukl. The; great
mortality of such children and their,
expense to the "state, afterward makes
, (CoatlHHea oa Pag 4) .
8TUDENT8 WATCH OLD 8PORT.
In
Pastime of Other Days Indulged
Behind Library.
Considerable excitement was arous
ed yesterday afternoon by a number
of small boys who jvore engaged in
the old sport of "pegging tops," About
a dozen little follows wore gathered
on the tennis court back of tho library
building and cries of "your In"' and
plug him, Mick," drifted, into tho II
brary until it became quite annoying.
A number of students were standing
about the circle of 'boysgiving advice
and Joking them and thoyj seemed
to takp as much interest in the game
as tho youngsters. Perhaps l this in
terest which was manifested was
purely reminiscent and yrill not result
In the Btaid "varsity" men adopting a
now Bport but from th"eremaf ks' over
heard about the circle of spectators, it
is certain that they all wished they
were in it
'r-rr-
MINI8TER8 HELP IN THE WORK
Take Part. In, Noon .Meeting of the
V. W. C. A.
Recently a new phase of Y., W. 0, A.
work, has been developed at the uni
versity. Pastors of the city churches
have beenLbrought to the university
to take part' in .the noon meetings
which the Y; W. C; A. Is .holdingWhile
this la not of interest in itself l(j
marks a new attitude toward the Y.
Wand Y. M.-.C. A. by the ministers
of the city, .
According to those who are con-
nected with the work it is contended
that this is a loiig step in advance' of
thopositipn hel by those 'organlza-
uons m tne-past It waa felt by .the
ministry that the Y. W, and Y,.M.
C; A. organizations were a hindrance
to the progress of -their work,, but this
feeling has changed to one xyt hearty
co-operation. " t
The freshman law class held a
meeting in,ir 309 Friday aoralng. : It
was decided to have a space in the
Cornhusker for-the clasa picture, it
the weather permlta a group picture of
the class will be takea Tveeday morn
ing at 11 o'clock, ,v , - ' ,
President Elmer W. Hills of the'son
lor class Is a roformor. Ho was not
oiocted upon a rdforra platform, but
ho is a roformor Just tho Bamo. He
rocognizos things neodlng reform
whon ho seos thorn, and ho is not
afraid to IntorpoBO his odlcts against
tho powor .of tradition." If things 'are
had Hills bollovos In changing them.
What Is more, ho acts according to
his bollofs. k-
Hills was elected prosldont of the
senior class Just one wook.ago Thurs
day. As soon as tho votos.had been
counted and the tallies niado. Hills
took possession of the office, The-first
duty in sight and tho most important
was tho appointment of committee
without number. Ono of thoso august
bodies as shown by class tradition
was called tho Ivy Day Charter orator
committee, and its duty was hold to
bo tho selection of a mombo.r of. ,the
fourth year organization who should
stand before tho assembled multitudes
d a bright spring day in May and
deliver tho high-sounding . phrases
which make up tho Ivy Day oration.
So far so good. But it wasn't as it
soomed'. ' - - j 37
. .A Useless Job, ,1.
Some years ago an onterprlslngi sen- "
ior politician while gunning) f6r.. the,
presidency discovered that the prbmlse
of tho ivy dayjionor was a most po
tent force "tiT usoin "gaining thV sup
port of some, ono of his classmates.
Ho was a wise politician and'he imme
diately made uso' of his knowledge.
Ho discovered that tho orator f was
appointed by a committee appointed
by tho president. Such had been the
traditionary custpm for all tho ages
of the past But a'llttlo thing like that
did not daunt the politician. He.went
to w,ork, and: found, three people who
promised to appoint .whomever, J10
Wished them; to name . as ivy' . day
barker. ,. c .- , ' '"' ' .
',"ThbJ cinched the deal. Ae, politic
ian promised tHo honor to a classmate .
who was abld to wield copilderaibie
influence. The classmate Aused his in
fluonpe. The politician was ..efecfed
president of, tho clWs. He appointed
the committee of three.. They chose
the influential classmate for the, r Ivy :.
day place. The deed, was done. '
Since the .Interesting discovery of
the amateur politician,'- the committee
tradition has peed maintained oniy so
far as the form was concerned. Bach
year the president, has. appointed, a
qommlttee, but each year, this commit
tee has b'oeVplodged' prior' to lisp
poihtmont to vote for thelnan favVini .
fay the power .that puV ft Kits .place
pt glory, ifaturally, al. went, well.
The presidential candidate could. as
sure the.plum t'o-whomever he thought
capable of doing him the,piogt good in
vpte-getting, and his, election .was" the.
much more, certain. In tiie eiection'of.
1908 the jyy. day bratorshlp was-the,
chief lssnjj, at stke, The two candi
dates had each -eplUtwl the political
services, of one c,thelr,' classmates'
jithfthe promise ottie oftyetedhoapr' .
and the campaign,, was fought pumas'
mHchOB. the i,retatv awits ottke
L (Cedjesiafe'ji):fi
'1
' '" ?
a
y-.
v -I.;;.-"
A-.'u
i4P&.
v " ...-.
t'i
,,r-