The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, February 12, 1909, Image 3

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    A
HE DAILY NEBRASKAN
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!-:
OLIVER THEATRE
8AT. MAT. & (NIQHT, FEB. 13
; Oil SwiRttn
Mat, 10 & 25c Night, 60, 35 & 25c
WED. MAT. & NIGHT, FEB. 17
llancht Walsh
In "THE TE8T"
Mat., $1.00 to 50c. Night, $1.50 to 50c
d
COMING
"THE SMART 8ET"
Tin Virginian .
io' bfi .ffiBt p o t ia i i, r
WflHMM lu sTaJ
Gus Edwards'
BLONDE TYPEWRITERS
With Arthur Conrad In a Musical
Comedy, "A Picnic For One"
Lillian Wright and Gordon Boys
Vocalists and Dancing Workers
M. Van Bergen Marlon Kr.esky
In "Where Hearts Beat True"
Fred Lewis and Martin Chapln
Comedy Singing, Dancing, Talking
ANITA PRIMR08E
English Music Hall Artist
PIQUO
Amusing and Amazing Gymnast
Extra Added Feature
AUSTIN BROTHERS
"The American Beauties"
Viascope Majestic Orchestra
Mat. 2:15 (except Mon.) 15 & 25c
Night 8:15. Prices 15, 25, 35 & 50c
ItYiHI
WEEK BEGINNING FEBRUARY 8
THE FULTON 8TOCK CO.
Appears In
A BEAUTIFUL STORY OF
THE SEA
NEXT WEEK: "THE MAN ON
THE BOX."
THE UNI SMOKE HOUSE
VMi'jincH all 8tudont.
Br ninrc nud Hilvor Lottor
fc LMl'hX Inlaid Work ci
B IH LJ BiK-clnlty.
UNI SMOKE HOUSE
11512 O Htreot
L. J. HERZOG
THf UNIVERS,TY MAr
Come in and get that $15.00 Suit
to your order
12530 O St.
Lincoln
HAVE
THE EVANS
Do. Your Washing
111 JXi n
TYPEWRITERS
Al nittkcfi "routed "with utnnd
$3 Per Month.
t Bargains in Rebuilt Machines.
LINCOLN TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE
fjAutoWVS-BolllUJl. - 133Nofllth-
'uj ,. TI vj-t' ' i- ' r
THE SIGNiriGANCE OF THE
LITE AND WORK OF DARWIN
By Dean C. E. Bessey
In tho world's history it hns oc
curred again and again that there
was need of "a volco In tho wilder
ness," and It was so when Darwin
came and began to cry In tho biolog
ical wilderness of tho middle of tho
nineteenth century. Like tho other
great biologist, Llnno, who was born
a century earlier, Darwin's great
work was not some notablo contri
bution to tho anatomy, tho physiology
or tho taxonomy of any group of
plants or animals, but It consisted iu
putting biological science upon a now
plane, a higher piano than that which
It had occupied bdforo. As Llnno
gave to biology a comprehensible tax--onomy
which made It impossible for
separated workers to Intelligently and
accurately communicate and compare
their resultB; Darwin mado possible a
taxonomy which Involves phylogeny.
Linno's classification was oaslly un
derstood and oaslly applied, and this
was Its great merit. It saved tho
time of tho blologlBt, but it did not,
nor Indeed was It Intonded to give
any clue as to tho real relationships
of plants and anlmalB. Darwin's
work mado nocssary tho Introduction
of the idea of relatlonshlo in classi
fication. It may bo asked, "What may all
this mean for tho ordinary student
In tho university?" It Is granted
that for the student In botany and zoo
logy. Darwin's work Is of high Im
portance, but on what ground may
general students claim an Interest in
Darwin's accomplishments? I am so
fortunate as to have seen something
of the time preceding Darwin's fa
mous publications. I saw with my
own eyes tho conflict between tho
old and tho now ideas; tho old and
tho new philosophy off tho world. Jt
was worth while living through that
period, for it allowed mo to see tho
fierce onslaught, tho long continued
battle, the dogged resistance, tho re
pulso, the retreat and finally the com
pleto rout of tho attacking forces.
It quickens my pulso today as I look
back to those years when tho battle
was still raging. I was personally
so fortunate as to bo a student In
a college whore to espouse tho now
doctrine of evolution was not consid
ered a Blgn of moral depravity. In
fact, aB nearly as I can mako out. all
of tho members of tho faculty were
evolutionists. So wo woro freo to
becomo evolutionists If wo felt so In
cllnod. But In many colleges of that
period tho doctrlno of ovolutlon could
not bo taught, and I know of ono
state unlvorslty In ono of our neigh
boring states In which profossors and
students who woro suspected of har
boring such horetlcal notions woro
discriminated against and mado tho
subject of denunciatory chapel ha
rangues. Thought was not freo In
most of tho collogos of that porlod.
Tho student today can not roallzo
what a change has heen wrought,
Tho battle so bravely waged by tho
Darwinians and finally won by them
gavo intellectual freedom to students
In tho collogos and universities,
whothor thoy sat In tho professor's
chair or on tho studont benches. And
today professors are freo to put any
doctrlno boforo their pupils, provldod
It is well and decently clothed, and
often evon this precaution Is not
rigidly Insisted upon. Tho fight for
freedom four to flvo decades ago has
freed tho college of tho old-tlmo In
tellectual trammels, and for thiB tho
Btudent today has cause to bo grate
ful to those who battled for him. For
this tho general studont has as much
reason for colobratlng tho birth of
Charles Darwin as has tho scientific
studont. Darwin waB jnoro than a
scientific man, ho was a propoundor
of a new philosophy, and In this ca
pacity ho became tho apostlo of In
tellectual freedom.
PETITION 18 BEING CONSIDERED
Request of Innocents and Black Masks
Soon Decided.
Tho petitions offered tho board of
deans by the senior societies of In
nocents and-Blnck Masks for tho ad
vancement of commencement exercis
es ono week Ib now being consldored
by tho Individual deans. Tho petition
as rolated in Saturday's Nebraskan
asks that tho commencement affairs
bo held ono week earlier In order that
students may attend them who., would
othorwlso bo at homo In various
towns of the state during tho later
porlod.
Tho deans will take action on tho
petition within o few days and their
00000000000OffiO0 oo o
YOUR APPFARANf-F Will not suffer if you have to wear!
1 Utll tYV r L,tllliVL, spectacles. They aro improving to
i ilr V . " HW,U uy uuo who anuorscanus now. ino eye
sight is too precious to neglect. Yon owe thom all tho attention and caro
r.nnr r.nnv mor nnA Tltitu mm! !. ! miiii& i . t i
-..., iuj ; ouu. ihoj uut ,aiciui aiiuiiuun nore. examination rr60.
Est 1871. HALLETT, Registered Optometrist, 1143 o
?030CSO000000
J
Happenings of the Past
IMlSMltU
Seven Years Ago.'
Freshman basket-ball team defeat
od by Y. M. C. A. second team in a
close contest ,
Six Years Ago.'
Daily Nebraskan has spirited ed
itorial on the custom of those in
charge of university dances of mak
ing a gread deal of money for them
selves out of unlvorslty functions.
First Inter-claBB debate held be
tween tho juniors and seniors.
Five Years Ago.
Sophomores protested against tho
way in which the Sombrero was bo
Ing managed and .demanded that thd
manager and edUor bo elected by tho
sqphomoro class.
Four Years Ago.
Nebraska defeated Baker by tho
score of 49 to 19 In basket-Sail.
Dr. Glapp matured plans for form
ing 'several faculty basket-ball teams.'
Members of faculty, however, declare
tha they do not wish to place them
selves in a compromising position.
, One Year Ago.
Captain Bellamy . of tho baseball,
team made BeVoro-complaint over tho
small number of nen "trying out for
places and declared a" good, team
could nob be selected without moro
men.
recommendation will go to tho sen
ate, who will 1hen take the matter
up with the board of regents in caso
tho action taken is favorable to tho
petitioners.
JOINED FEDERATION OF CLUB8
Catholic i Club Becomes J' Member 'of
National Organization.
At a recent mooting or the Catholic
Students' 'club thoy decided to accept
the invitation to Join tho American
Federation of Catholic Studont clubs.
Tho club has elected J. F. Coupe as a
delegate toirepreseht them-at the sec
ond convention of tho federation, to
be hold in Iowa City on tho 12th and
13th of this month. '
Other prominent clubs 'represented
in-tho federation aro those of Cornell,
Pennsylvania, Purdue, Wisconsin,1
Minnesota-, Missouri, Iowa and Colo
rado. Tho federation was -Organized
two years, ago and holdi'its first meet
ing nt Lafayette, Indiana.
'.; " " '
, For tho first tlmo in several yean
tho flnnnnlnl atntnn of atlilntlno .it
'Wisconsin is a healthy one. As a re
sult or. nor return to "Dig games,"
Wisconsin has a surplus of 111.000 in
tin nTilnttt frnttttir jfPtA aUiiMUn
is a decided contrast from that of not
U1U1W lUllfl I.WU yViUB HU wauu UlU
uaufiur iruunury wuh uot4 omy empty
lint ji detit nf ii.Snn w in tn ViaM
and indoor anorta worn AnMrAfvHm.
poBslblo because of tho funds scaf city.
Some Valentine
Books
Book of Sweethearts Illust
rated. Rileys Old 8weetheart of. Mine
Illustrated.
Memories by Max Mullen. .
Love 8ong by Henrlch Heine.
For Thee Alone Grace Hart
strom. A Dream of Fair Women many
illustrations.
For Love's Sweet 8ake Love
'Poems.
Love Letters of a Violinist
Eric Mackey,
Old Love 8tories Retold Le
Qalllenne,
Henry Hutt Plcturo Book.
Love 8ongs From the Greek.
Sweeter 8tl Than This Sut
ton. Love's Young Dream Pictures
by Underwood,
Those are only a few of the
many book Valentines each
with bands and ribbons.
Prldod at 1:00 to $3.00,
Artestic Valentines
Wo show many oxcIubIvo. doBlgnB in Now Valontinos that aro
quite different than usually shown. Many numbors havo oxcoptlonal
artistic inorlt and will bo valuod as pictures long after thoy havo
served their mission as Valontinos. Tho assortment Is almost un-.
limited ranging" in price from lc to $1.50.
Miller & Paine
Fraternity Hall
March 5th, 1909
Pershing Rifles Hop
Tickets $7.25
Walt's Orchestra
COLLEGE
TAILORS
COLLEGE VIEW
H I J i -tj
BEST TAILORING
. at th , ,
BEST PRICES
Auto Phon 48
Have Yot Ever
Regal Shoes
Worn
v If you really don't know what Shoo Comfort, style and aatiafac
tlon is. Thoy will outwear any other shoo on tho market, and they
cost only ,
r ,
A.tC, ti4
$3.50; $4.00 and $5.00
THERE'S NOTHING JUST ,AS GOOD AS
..in '"
.
u
REGALS
tr
;
'
't
rfW
kk
If you would get full Value for your money try a pair.
; Sold in Lincoln Only 6y
1
.
4 fi
'i-ri .
Soeier & Simon
N. E. C0DNER 10TH AND 0 STREETS1 h ,
.JU UU 4WC frS&S23feg
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