The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, March 27, 1908, Image 2

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THE DAILY NBBRASKAN
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THE PROPERTY OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA.
Lincoln. Nebraska.
PUBLISHED EYEIT OAT EXCEPT 8UN0AY AND MONDAY
BY THB STUDENT PUB. BOARD.
PibllCltlM Offlci, 126 No. 14th St.
EDITORIAL STAFF.
EdItop-ln-Chlef Rom Kino. '08
Managing Editor Q. L. Fenlon, '08
AMoclate Editor R. L. Harris, 10
BU8INE88 STAFF.
Manager Qeorge M. Wallace, '10
Circulator W. A. Jones, '10
Assistant Circulator L. J. Weaver, '10
OFFICE HOURS.
EdItor-ln-Chlef 2 to 4 p.m.
Manager 9 to 10 a. m.
Editorial and Business Office!
BA8EMENT, ADMINISTRATION BLDQ.
Postofflce, Station A, Lincoln, Neb.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, 2.00 PER YEAR
Payable In Advance
8lngle Copies. S Cents Each
Telephones: Bell A 1466, Auto 1888
INDIVIDUAL NOTICES will bo charged
for at tho rate of 10 cents per Insertion
for ovory fifteen words or fraction thereof.
Faculty notices and University bulletins
will gladly bo published freo
Entered at the poatofTlco at Lincoln,
Nebraska, as second-class mall matter
under tho Act of Congress of March 8.
1870.
THE MA88MEETINQ.
If the atudonts at Nebraska Uni
versity wish to show whore they stand
on the question of the liquor traffic
they now have the chance. Today's
Convocation 1b solely tho result of
student sentiment and the belief that
this sentiment ought to be more wide
ly known In Lincoln and over the
state.
An educational institution ought to
stand for a clean community in which
it is located. The old argument that
prohibition will not accomplish this
result is mere pandering with tho is
sue and particularly in a city like Lin
ing election. There can be no ques
tion as to tho answer.
A Nebraska caso directly in point
has been construed by two members
of the law faculty as permitting but
a very small number to vote. The
decision in this cubo reads:
"The rule Is well established that a
student who goes to a college town
with the intention of remaining there
simply as a student and only until his
education Is completed and who does
not change his intention, doeB not ac
quire a residence there and retains the
domicile of his origin. He must in
order to gain residence have no other
place to go in caso of sickness." Again
In tho same case: "A person who
comes to the seat of the University
mainly for the purpose of gaining an
education, if not dependent upon his
parents for support 'and Is accustomed
to leave the University during vaca
tion is entitled to vote at the seat of
the University.
Clearly, there are very few men who
can conscientiously All all of these re
quirements, and no student ought to let
his enthusiasm for a good cause in
fluence him to swear to a He in order
to help tho cause along. But we can
be a help in the campaign by 'showing
that wo want Lincoln clean and that
we think that making it dry will do a
great deal toward accomplishing that
rosult Education and culture stand for
nothing consistent with the liquor traf
fic and when the students of an educa
tional institution are so directly affect
ed there is all tho more reason for a
strong and determined effort to do
away with an evil that is undermining
the lives of so many young men.
Advertising in college journals has
undergone quite a change in the last
few years. This is nowhere more no
ticeable than In the Dally Nebraskan.
Now is the Time
We sold thousands of dollars worth at our big auc
tion, but still have many beautiful pieces of jewelry
and silver and they go at actual cost until April 1st.,
when the remodeling of our room commences.
HALLETT, Jeweler, 1143 0 Street
coin, where tire-intemperance of so
many young students, due to public
drinking houBos would be practically
done, away wlthby killing the-saloon.
A prominent member of the Faculty
who is in a position to know, made the
statement yesterday that one-third of
the male students of this university
go into saloons.
A big majority of these are young
fellows who have learned to drink un
der tho tutelage of older students.
They are away from homo and their
associates easily influence them into
going to the saloons by example which
would not be possible even though
liquor was obtainable in a more un
lawful and difficult way. Not even
the advocates of license among the
students can deny that the student
body would be materially benefitted in
this respect by prohibition.
Why then, shouldn't the student
body express its sentiment in the
matter? The students' of Illinois were
able to considerably Influence the city
elections without voting, but- merely
by taking a definite stand for a dry
town, There has' been some discus
sion as to whether the students ought
to register in order to vote in the com-
Nebraskan advertisers have almost
passed the stage of the stereotyped
"ad" boastfully declaring some gener
ality about quality of goods and econ
omy of price, as a glance at our col
umns will show. Lincoln merchants
are paying as much attention to tho
advertisements they write for these
columns as to those they write for the
larger dailies. It has not been an un
common thing to find an advertise
ment run in the Nebraskan one day
and duplicated the next in one of the
down-town papers, following in detail
the "set-up" of the Nebraskan.
Does advertising in a college paper
pay ? Lincoln merchants no longer ask
this question in regard to the Daily Ne
braskan. In the old days it was often
necessary for the advertising solicitor
to get his "ads" by advancing a charity
plea. The adyertiser was told that he
helping support a good cause, that the
University brought a large amount of
trade to Lincoln and therefore he
should help out student enterprises.
No Buch thing now-a-days. Advertis
ing is solicited only on the merits of
the Daily Nebraskan as an advertising
medium and tho Lincoln merchants
are not slow to realize that their ad
vertisements are being read with the
same bargain-hunting zeal as those in
the city papers.
for young men
we present without exception
- - ' " ' ! I1H1M 11 I I I I I I I. I I .1 -gM !
the greatest assortment of
kollege klothes
compare our showing with others
and you will have the proof
Hats and Shoes, too
MAYER BROS
UNIVER8ITY BULLETIN.
Friday, march 27.
Non-Commissloned Officers' Hop.
Saturday, March 28.
Dramatic Club play.
3 to 5 p. m.
Silver Serpent reception to Sopho
more girls.
8:00 p. m. Armory.
Annual gymnastic exhibition.
March 30 to April 4.
Monday to Saturday, inclusive.
Mid-semester examinations.
Friday, April 3.
Engineering Society Hop.
Friday, April 10.
Junior Informal.
GEORGE BROS., Printers
(OPPER PIATE EMRAVIIW
, AND
STEEL DYE EMBOSSING
A NICE LINE OF STATIONERY
Fraternity Bldg., LINCOLN, NEB.
"Your next." Arlsto Barber Shop,
1206 O St. v
RIGHT MATERIALS FOR
GRADUATION GOWNS
PLAIN FRENCH LAWNS
or AL '"f5!168 wlde ver' sheer, medium weight, crisp, launder well
35c, 40c, 50c, 60c, 75c, 85c, $1.00, $1.25 and $1,50 a yard.
CHIFFON ORGANDIE AND PARIS MUSLIN
.i Both 66 inches wide; like French lawn, but very light and airv
the first without dressing, the second with some. Bach" at 50c GDc
75c, 90c, $J.OO,$1.25and-$1.50-a-rard. &0CfiDc,
PERSIAN LAWN
32 Inches wide, soft, close, glossy, 18c, 20c, 25c, 30c, 35c, 40c, 50c
and 60c a yard. ' v
45 inches wide, 35c, 40c, 50c and 60c a yariL-
SCOTCH ORGANDIE
32 Inches wide, stiff, sheer; will launder, 18c, 20c, 25c, 30c, 35c
and 40c a yard. ' . - '
WASH CHIFFON
48 Inches .wide, sheer, light and airy, launders well, 50 and 60
cents a yard. .
FIGURED IMPORTED SWISS
Small figures or dots, requires very little trimming, launders well
very serviceable, 32 Inches wide, 50c, 60c, 70c, 75c, 85c, 90c, $1.00 and
$1.25 a yard.
EMBROIDERED FRENCH MULL8
Without dressing, very light and soft, small figures, new and very
beautiful, 40 inhces wide, 85c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $1.60, $2.00, $2 25. $2 50
and $3.00 a yard. ' '
AIR LINE CLOTH
All silk, cloudy and airy, washes well, does not crush, very dressv
48 inches-wide, 85 cents to 1.00 a'yard. '
SILK VOILE
44 Jinches wide, $1.50 a yard.
JAPANESE 8ILK
Washes well, soft, .lustrous, 27 and 36 Inches wide 55 cents to $1 25
In both widths. r
CREPE DE CHINE8
23 inches wide, 59 cents a yard
24 Inches wide, $1.00 a yard
40 Inches wide, $1.00 a yard
MILLER & PAINE
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