The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, February 28, 1907, Image 1

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Vol. VI. No. 95.
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA, LINCOLN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, J907.
Price 5 Cents.
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ENTER PROTEST
8TUDENT8 OPP08E PLAYING UN
DER CONFERENCE RULES.
A
IDIotatorlal Attitude of "Big Nine"
Teams Arouse 8tudents Favor
Severance of Athletic Relations.
'000000000000Q
Rules Opposed. U
No student shall participate 0
In Intercollegiate athletics for Q
more than three years In the ag- X
gregate. To be effective Sep- jtf
tember 1, 1906, except for
student who participated in X
Intercollegiate athletics in the Y
academlo year 1905-6; for these 0
it Will be effective December 1, 9
1906.
Participation shall be con
fined to students who have not
graduated, from any department jg
of a college or university. Ef- o
fective September 1, 1906.
Nebraska football players af
fected by the Rules:
John Welter, captain of 1908
eleven.
Merle Little.
O0000030000000
"If Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin
Insist on our football eleven playing
under the strict Conference rules In
the-games with their teams next fall,
-we favor severing athletic relations
with those Institutions and forming a
"Big Pour In tho Missouri Valley."
This Is the unanimous sentiment of
the students of the University of Ne
tiraBka regarding tho football games
Which tho three "Big Nino" teams
want to play with the Cornhuskors
under the Conference rules next fall.
Such a settled opinion was formed
among tho students by the dictatorial
stand whloh the Universities of Min
nesota, Wisconsin, 'and Iowa have
taken on the football rules governing
the contingent games with Nebraska
next fall. Tho three "Big Nine"
schools Insist that Nebraska must ob
serve all the rules of the Conference
and the Cornhuskors say they will bo
bound by all but a few of the rules.
There are only two rules that Ne
braska objects to observing and theBe
are the rules that tho Conference
schools say we must obey. The rules'
under dispute If accepted by tho Corn
huskors would prevent the playing of
first year men and graduate students,
keeping Captain Wellor and Merle
Little out of tho football contests
next fall.
AH arrangements except deciding
upon the rules, have been made by
Manager Eager for football contests
with Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa.
The games will be played October, 19;
November, 16; and October, 22 re
spectively, providing rules are agreed
upon. Futile negotiations have been
carried' on with the three conference
schools by Mr, Eager for several
weekB. When he returned from the
eastern basket-ball trip Monday ho
announced that the athletic author
'ities atMhpse, Institutions were still
"atandinfiNjmt,".'' This statement by
Mr. Eager at onco aroused tho atu-
' (Continued on page Jt)
SOSO'W8K!PO00OffiO00 O
WILLIAM HOLME8.
"Ducky" Holmes, who will coach the Cornhusker baseball team
this spring, Is manager of the Lincoln Western League nine and for
merly a member of the Chicago White Sox team of the American
League. He is one of the best baseball experts In the West and his
long experience on the diamond gives him great ability as a coach.
His work with the Nebraska baseball squad will begin in about three
weeks. Courtesy of Tho Star.
ooooooooooo a o
8CI88OR PARTY.
Juniors Will Cut Up in Memorial Hall
- Saturday Night.
Tho Junior Scissors Party on next
Saturday night will be one of tho most
Informal affairs of tho year. Chair
man Matters promises that something
will be doing all the time, and that it
will bo thoroughly enjoyablo to all.
The first part of the program will
consist of various specialty "stunts,"
performed by some of the most skilled
fun-makers in school.
At great expense and considerable
effort on the part of the comml.ttoo,
the original "Brlgham Young" has
been secured for this occasion. He
will give an exhibition of his match
less powers of ventriloquism, by
which ho Is said to have wooed three
(3) young ladles at one and the same
time.
The pie eating contest, concerning
which there has been manifested so
much Interest tho paBt week, promlsos
to be an exciting race, and It Is ru
mored that one party has posted a
largo sldo bet on the outcome.
A revised version of the last act of
Shakespeare's romantic "Romeo and
Juliet" will bo rendered by the finest
dramatic talent in the olass. The re
vision of tho play has been authorized
and criticized by tho Department of
Elocution, and, being the result of
three weeks' strenuous practice on the
part of the cast, it promises to .be a
most commendable production.
Many games will be played ahd a
new grand march (executed for the
first time in Lincoln, Nebr.) will close
ommooaiiK)mOK
BASKET - JB J L, L
; DENVER vsi NEBRASKA
FRIDAY, MARCH ONE
&J5P.H.
INFORMAL DANCE WITH PROGRAMS AFTER GAME
toowoiMooKwyoi
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s
ooooooooooooe
tho first part of the evening. Danc
ing will begin shortly beforo ten, and
a good orchestra has boon secured.
NEW COLLECTION.
Interesting .Weapons .and .Curios
Loaned to Museum by
Officers
L. L. and G. W. Gregg of Osceola,
both lieutenants in the 1st Nebraska,
with service in the Philippines and In
China to their credit have loaned to
tho University Museum for five years,
their collection of weapons, made
while they were in tho Orient. Tho
collection includes implements of war
faro of all sorts,, also many curios
from China, among them being some
portions of a carvod wooden screen
taken from tho Empress' palace in
Pokln when tho forolgn soldiers broke
into tho city during the Boxer up
rising. There Is also a sword worn by
tho brothers In turh, which originally
belonged to a Philippine general. G.
W. Gregg, who brought the collection
to Lincoln, goes soon to China whore
ho has a commission in a government
military school, which commission
lasts five years. At tho end of that
time the brothers will decide whether
or not tho collection is to become the
permanent property of the Museum.
The Registrar of the University of
Minnesota makes the" claim that the
enrollment at that institution has
passod the 4,000 mark. This count in
cludes the short term agricultural stu
dents and the names of those who
have been dismissed on account of
"flunks.'-'
bH' H
CONTESTS HELD
FIR8T OF 8ERIE8 OF CONTE8T8
HELD IN ARMORY LA8T NIGHT.
Half the Regular List of Events Aro
Completed Johnson First
Individual 8cores.
Tho first of tho two gymnastic con
tests was hold Tuesday ovonlng In tho
OymnaBlum. There aro bIx regular
events In tho contest, only half being
run off at that time. These wore ox
orciBCB on tho horizontal bar, parallel
bar and long horao. JolniBon won tho
most points, Klessolbach was second,
and Patterson third.
Each contestant had three trials and
was judged on approach, exorcise,
form and retroat. Following is tho
score by events:
Horizontal Bar.
Johnson 80
Klessolbach 77.5
Mitchell .: 76.5
Patterson 72.5
Carson 72.5
Dawson 68.5
Parallel Bars.
Johnson 88
Patterson 82.5
Klessolbach 81.8
Dawson 73 . 5
Carson 73
Mitchell 73
Long Horse.
Johnson 73
Patterson 66
Carson 64
Kiesselbach ; 63
Mitchell . 60
Dawson 57
Totals.
Johnson 241
Kiesselbach 222.3
Patterson 221
Carson 209.5
Mitchell '. 209.5
Dawson 199
Tho contestant winning tho largest
number of points In tho ontlro contest
Is awarded an "N."
The next contest will occur early in
March.
JORDAN 8PEAK8 TO VOLUNTEER
BAND.
Fellow 8tudent With "Bummy" Booth
at Prnceton.
Dr. Jordan spoke at the regular
weekly meeting of tho University Vol
unteor Band on the subject of "Mo
hammedanism" Tuesday night. Mo
hammediBm, Mr. Jordan says, Is tho
only religion that in any appreciable
degree may bo said ,at present to
rival Christianity in tho missionary
field. He showed statistics to provo
this, and said that all other religions
wore conducting a "masterly. retreat.'
Mr. Jordan Is a graduate of Prince
ton, where he was well acquainted
with "Bumny" Booth In the coach's
early college days. He boasts of hav
been called to take Booth's place at
center when Booth was not "making
good" in his first years, but admits
that the coach began to show his met
tie soon after. .
Juniors, Attention!
AU Juniors wishing to order hats
should do so before Saturday noon,
March 2, as the special, time limit
cannot be gotten after that date.
IIIA O. VON PORELL, '
Chairman Hat Committee.
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