The daily Nebraskan. ([Lincoln, Neb.) 1901-current, March 23, 1904, Page 2, Image 2

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ASSOCIATH EDITORS
Wrw - - - P. A.Bwtftjt
Athlttlc ' - - J. D. CUrk
Lltmry - Dorothy Grtn
Rtportcit D. r. D Young nd MM Fooler
And Raymttut H. McCw.
pWrttn Frio, H ye y . U b4tm
I ft tli sNteflw UumIil Wdirute
M MOBfl-lM Mil BSfttUr.
Editorial Remarks
Plagiarism has occupied quite a
prominont placo in connection with
oratorical contest In different parts of
the country this year. In fact this ele
ment has boon more In evidence this
year than for some -time past. At bov
oral schools ovon lately have trials
been held as a result of tho tendencies
of orators who prefor to borrow the
master thoughts than attempt to cre
ate some for themselves. Such revela
tions of untoward conduct in oratorical
contests seem to be bobbing up at reg
ular intervals in Bplte of the examples
frequently made. Such experiences at
Brown and at an Iowa Institution are
still fresh in the memory Sof many of
us, and now a flagrant case at Minne
sota is producing considerable excite
ment. This plagiarism If one is to judge
from appearances, is growing to be an
epidemic, scattering infectious germs
that develop Into bad results. The
humiliation attendant upon exposure
ought to be sufficient to dotor any stu
dent from running the risck, oven if the
proper morals are lacking. A man
practicing it puts himself into a posi
tion where the chances are against him,
risking all on not being found out. If
ho succeeds in evading suspicion, then
his feelings of triumph over whatever
he may achieve must be mingled with
some misgivings, and he can not feel
tho pleasure that ho would have felt
had he buckled down and won out by
his own hand work.
Anyone struggling to achieve success
In oratory should be prompted by no
stronger motive than to work hard
and do his best to win out. If he loses
he has oxperionco and can try again
Each time he goes through a course of
preparation and tries again, he
strengthens himself that much. But
he never will I lcreaso his mental capa
city or moral worth by purloining tho
thoughts of another and disguising
them as Ins own. He risks all for tri
umph that is a disgrace to himself,
even if his wrong doing Is never known
by others, rte runs the same risk as
does a breaker of the laws, and when
detected he Is not regarded in a much
better light. In his case indeed the way
of tho transgressor is hard, if he is
found out; for ere he has travelled his
course ho will And himself In a situa
tion" that Is troublesome to say tho
least.
O
The debate with Iowa Is off. Tho
conditions relating to time and placo
were of such a character, that we could
not thlnK of closing negotiations for
ft contest. Tho debates with Washing
ton and Kansas como close together,
and each of them will require a tre
mendous concentration of effort. A
third contest entering In would great-
ly Increoso tho burden of our debaters
in fact to such a degree as to render
It altogether Impracticable. Wo would
like to have met Iowa', as she Is a likely
opponent In debate, but our debaters
can not well do so much in so short
a time as the Increased burden en
tailed by a meeting with her would nec
essitate O
The Junior Prom, committee at
Cornell has an excellent system of
managing things, which Is Indeed com
mendable in an Institution where it
can bo put In operation. They report
ed $3.74 on hand and ti3 coming In on
programs. Fifty dollars was also glvon
to the Foncing association, and $50 to
aid tho Junior Smoker committee. Each
of the sixteen men of the Hop commit
tee will receive a watch fob costing $11).
The question of the Easter vaca
tion Is still puzzling many institutions.
The students at many places are desir
ous for a longer rest than has been
granted them In the past, and have
adopted the cuBtom of making their
wishes known by means of petitions.
In Bomo places considerable oxclto
ment has been caused by the refusal
of the faculty to grant these petitions.
California has received a gift of
a $700,000, and yet we have heard of
no complaints from anyone regarding
Its acceptance. California is a richer
state than Nebraska, and yet the peo
ple there have realized that endow
ments and contributions by wealthy
partleB are necessary to the fullest de
velopment of a state Institution. It
has been pointed out that because the
people of other commonwealths see ii
to acept the contributions of wealthy
men, It does not follow that we do so.
And yet Is It not likely that people in
other states are guided by reason as
well as oursolvos, and that If their In
stitutions that have received gifts are
willing to accept more, their experience
disproves the allegation that disastrous
results Inevitably attend the acceptance
of such gifts? Will anyone think of as
sailing tho moral character of tho stu
dents of Yale, Harvard and other In
stitutions that have received gifts
from wealthy parties? Our great east
ern schools have been in tho habit of
leceiving such gifts for years, and does
anyone assert that their moral atmo
sphere Is vitiated thereby, as Is al
leged will be tho case at Nebraska
when the Temple Building is construct
ed? Wo must be practical. It Is use
less to theorize in discussing such a
thing as the Temple Bullying. We must
look around us for statistics and pre
cedents, considering tho experience of
institutions where gifts and contribu
tions have been accepted, before wo
draw conclusions too readily. Theoriz
ing on moral matters Is apt to lead one
into error and one must not be led to
conviction until ho sees tho practical
workings of his theory put Into opera
tion. If there" is a taint on such gifts
how does It manifest itself? What sta
tistics have ever been cited to show
that there Is one? If wo don't reason
out the thing for, ourselves and find
substantial proofs for our convictions,
we are apt to fall Into error.
Pioneer barber Bhop, open till S. 11th
and-O.
Don Caraeron'a lunch counter foi
good service.
Box of cigars given away every day
at Powell's Oliver theatre hulldlng.
The Whltobreast Co., at 1106 O St.,
Is the, place to buy coal.
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