The Columbus journal. (Columbus, Neb.) 1874-1911, August 03, 1910, Image 3

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CHAPTER I.
I Go to Pittsburg.
McKnJght Is gradually taking over
the criminal end of the business I
never liked It, and since the strange
case of the man In lower ten. I have
been a bit Bqueamish. Given a case
like that, where you can build up a
network of clews that absolutely In
criminate three entirely different peo
ple, only one of whom can be guilty,
and your faith in circumstantial evl
dense dies of overcrowding. I never
ee a shivering, white-faced wretch In
the prisoners dock that I do not hark
back with shuddering horror to the
strange events on the Pullman car
Ontario, between Washington and
Pittsburg, on the night of September
9. last.
McKnight could tell the story a
great deal better than I. although he
cannot spell three consecutive words
correctly. But. while he has Imagi
nation and humor, he is lazy.
"It didn't happen to me. anyhow."
be protested, when I put It up to him.
"And nobody cares for second-hand
thrills. Besides, you want the un
varnished and ungarnlshed truth, and
I'm no hand Tor that. I'm a lawyer '
So am I. although there have been
times when my assumption In that
particular has been disputed. I am
unmarried, and Just old enough to
dance with the grown-up little sisters
of the girls I used to know. I am fond
of outdoors, prefer horses to the afore
said grown-up little sisters, and with
out sentiment ("am" crossed out and
"was" substituted. Ed.) and com
"plctely ruled and frequently routed by
my housekeeper, an elderly widow.
In fact, of all the men of my ac
quaintance. I was probably the most
prosaic, the least adventurous, the
one man In a hundred who would be
likely to go without a deviation from
the normal through the orderly pro
cession of the seasons, summer suits
to winter flannels, golf to bridge.
So It was a queer freak of the de
mons of chance to perch on my un
susceptible 30-year-old chest, tie me
up with a crime, ticket me with a
love affair, and start me on that sen
sational and not always respectable
Journey that ended so surprisingly less
than three weeks later In the firm's
private office. It had been the most
remarkable period of my life. I would
neither give It up nor live It again
under any Inducement, and yet all
that I lost was some 20 yards oft my
drive!
It was really McKnlght's turn to J
make the next Journey. I had a
tournament at Chevy Chase for Satur
day, and a short yacht cruise planned
for Sunday, and when a man has been
grinding at statute law for a week, he
needs relaxation. But McKnJght
begged off It was not the first time!
he had shirked that summer in order
to run down to Richmond, and 1 was
Burly about iL But this time he had j
i new excuse. I
"I wouldn't he able to look after the !
business if I did go." he said. He has'
a sort of wide-eyed frankness that j
makes one ashamed to doubt him.
"I'm always car sick crossing the j
mountains. It's a fact. Lollie. See-i
jawing over the peaks does it. Why. !
crossing the Alleghany mountains has i
the gulf stream to Bermuda beaten to
a frazzle."
So I gave him up finally and went
home to pack. He came later in the
evening with his machine, the Can
nonbail. to take me to the station, and
he brought the forged notes in the
Itronson case.
"Guard them with your life." he
warned me. "They are more precious
.nan honor. Sew them In your chest
protector, or wherever people keep
valuables. I never keep any. I'll not
be happy until I see Gentleman Andy
doing the lockstep."
He sat down on my clean collars,
found my cigarettes and struck a
match on the mahogany bed post with
one movement.
"Where's the Pirate?" he demanded.
The Pirate Is my housekeeper. Mrs.
Klopton. a very worthy woman, so
labeled and libeled because of a fe
rocious pair of eyes and what Mc-J
Knight called a bucaneering nose. 1
quietly closed the door Into the hall.
"Keep your voice down. Richey." I
aid. "She Is looking for the evening
paper to see if it Is going to rain. She
has my raincoat and an umbrella wait
ing in the hall."
The collars being damaged beyond
repair, he left them and went to the
window. He stood there for some
time, staring at the blackness that
represented the wall f the house
next door.
"It's raining now." he said over his
shoulder, and' closed the window and
the shutters. Something In his voice
made me glance up. but he was watch
ing me. his hands idly in his pockets.
"Who lives next door?" he Inquired
in a perfunctory tone, after a pause.
I was packing my razor.
"House is empty," I returned absent
ly. "If the landlord would put It in
some sort of shape "
"Did you put those notes In your
pocket?" he broke in.
"Yes." 1 was impatient. "Along
with my certificates of registration.
baptism and vaccination. Whoever '
wants them will have to steal my coat
to get them."
"Well. 1 would move them. If I were
you. Somebody in the next house
was confoundedly anxious to see
where you put them. Somebody right
at that window opposite."
I scoffed at the idea, but neverthe
less I moved the papers, putting them
in my traveling bag. well down at the
bottom. McKnight watched me un
easily. "I have a hunch that you are going
to have trouble." he said, as I locked
the alligator bag. "Darned if 1 like
55MAN
ijowmi
hy- MAKT ROBERT? RINE1
JLJTICU& OT THE CIIMULA32 CTAniAK
ILtlJrRAriONS bjr M.G.KETTNER
COWR.I&MT ly flOBBS
"Guard This
starting anything Important on Fri
day." "You have a congenital dislike to
start anything on any old day." I re
torted, still sore from my lost Sat
urday. "And if you knew the owner
of that house as I do you would know
that If there was any one at that
window he is paying rent for the
privilege."
Mrs. Klopton rapped at the door
and spoke discreetly from the hall.
"Old Mr. McKnight bring the even
ing paper?" she Inquired.
"Sorry, but I didn't. Mr. Klopton."
McKnight called. "The subs won,
three to nothing." He listened, grin
ning, as she moved away with little
irritated rustles of her black silk
gown
I finished my packing, changed my
collar and Tas ready to go. Then
very cautiously we put out the light
and opened the shutters. The win
dow across was merely a deeper black
in the darkness. It was closed and
dirty And yet, probably owing to
Richey's suggestion. I had an un
easy sensation of eyes staring across
at me. The next moment we were at
the door, poised for flight. j
"We'll have to run for it," I said in i
a whisper. "She's down there with
a package of some sort, sandwiches '
probably. And she's threatened me
with overshoes for a month. Ready
row!"
I had a kaleidoscopic view of Mrs.
Klopton in the lower hall, holding out
'..... .- .. ., ,., ,
an armful of such traveling impedi-!
ment-i as she deemed essential, while
beside her. Kuphemia. the colored
housemaid, grinned over a white
wrapped box.
"Awfully sorry no time back Sun
day." I panted over my shoulder. Then
the door closed and the car was mov
ing away.
McKnight bent forward and stared
at the facade of the empty house next
door as we passed. It was black,
staring, mysterious, as empty build
ings arc apt to be.
"I'd like to hold a post-mortem on
that corpse of a house." he said
thoughfully. "By George. I've a no
tion to get out and take a look."
"Somebody after the brass pipes."
I scoffed. "House has been empty for
a year."
With one hand on the steering
wheel McKnight held out the other for
my cigarette case. "Perhaps," he
said; "but I don't see what she would
want with brass pipe."
"A woman!" I laughed outright
"You have been looking too hard at
the picture in the back of your watch,
that's all. There's an experiment like
that. If you stare long enough "
But McKnight was growing sulky:
he sat looking rigidly ahead, and he
did not speak again until he brought
the Cannonball to a stop at the sta
tion. Even then it was only a per
functory remark. He went through
the gate with me, and with five min
utes to spare, we lounged and smoked
in the train shed. My mind had slid
away from my surroundings and had
wandered to a polo pony that I
couldn't afford and intended to buy
anyhow. Then McKnight shook off
his taciturnity.
"For heaven's sake, don't look so
martyred." he burst out; "I know
you've done all the traveling this sum
mer. 1 know you're missing a game
to-morrow. But don't be a patient
mother: confound it I have to go to
Richmond on Sunday. I I want to
see a girl."
"Oh. don't mind me." I observed
politely. "Personally. I wouldn't
change places with you. What's her
name North? South?"
"West." he snapped. "Don't try to
be funny. And all I have to say.
Biakeley. is that if you ever fall In
love I hope you make an egregious
ass of yourself."
In view of what followed, this came
rather close to prophecy.
The trip west was without incident I
,ithaii.i. conPATty
with Your Life."
I played bridge with a furniture deal-
I er from Grand Rapids, a sales agent
for a Pittsburg Iron firm and a young
professor from an eastern college. I
won three rubbers out of four, finished
what cigarettes McKnight had left
me and went to bed about one o'clock.
It was growing cooler, and the rain
had ceased. Once, toward morning, I
wakened with a start, for no apparent
reason, and sat bolt upright I had
an uneasy feeling that some one bad
been looking at me, the same sensa-
i tion. I had experienced earlier In the
J evening at the window. But I could
i feel the bag with the notes, between
me and the window, and with my arm
thrown over it for security, I lapsed
again into slumber. Later, when I
, tried to piece together the fragments
of that journey. I remembered that
my coat which had been folded and
placed beyond my restless tossing,
had been rescued in the morning from
i. heterogeneous jumble of blankets,
evening papers and cravat, had been
shaken out with profanity and donned
with wrath. At the time, nothine oc
curred to me but the necessity ofne ale ror breakfast and did not cat
writing to the Pullman Company and
asking them if they ever traveled in
their own cars. I even formulated
some of the letter.
( I was more cheerful after I had had
a cup of coffee in the Union station.
It was too early to attend to business.
and I lounged in the restaurant and
hid behind the morning papers. As 1
i" B "
visit and its object On the first pace
was a staring announcement that the
forged papers in the Bronson case
had been brought to Pittsburg. Un
derneath, a telegram from Washing
ton stated that Iawrence Blakcley of
Biakeley & McKnight had left for
Pittsburg the night before, and that,
owing to the approaching trial of the
Bronson case and the illness of John
Gllmore, the Pittsburg millionaire,
who was the chief witness for the
prosecution. It was supposed that the
visit was intimately concerned with
the trial
I looked around apprehensively.
There were no reporters yet In sight
and thankful to have escaped notice
I paid for my breakfast and left At
the cabstand I chose the least dilapi
dated hansom I could find, and giving
the driver the address of the Gllmore
residence, in the East end, I got in.
1 was just in time. As the cab
turned and rolled off, a slim young
man in a straw hat separated himself
from a little group of men and hur
ried toward us.
"Hey! Walt a minute there!" he
called, breaking Into a trot
But the cabby did not bear, or per
haps did not care to. We jogged com-
NO ESCAPE FROM THE TUNAS
Flying Fish and Sardines Rounded
Up In Schools and Devoured
by Hundreds.
I have observed some curious
scenes at sea, but never have I seen
fear so forcibly expressed as by a
school of flying fishes exhausted and
at the mercy of the voracious tunas,
declares a correspondent of the Out
ing Magazine. I have bad them gather
about my boat and cling to Its keel
as closely as they could, while the
air was full of leaping tunas and soar
ing flying fish. At such times when a
school of sardines la rmindad tin that
fishes are so terrified that mea have
In hriinMi nl ioKSs wH
fortably along, to my relief, leaving
the young man far behind. I avoid
reporters on principle, having learned
long ago that I am an easy mark for
a clever Interviewer.
It was perhaps nine o'clock when I
lsft the station. Our way was along
the boulevard which hugged the aid
or one of the city's great hills. Far
below, to the left, lay the railroad
tracks and the seventy times seven
looming stacks of the mills. The white
mist of the river, the grays and blacks
of the smoke blended Into a half-re
vealing haze, dotted here and there
with fire. It was unlovely, tremen
dous. Whistler might have painted It
with its pathos. Its majesty, but he
would have missed what made it In
finitely suggestive the rattle and
roar of Iron on Iron, the rumble of
wheels, the throbbing beat, against
the ears, of fire and heat and brawn
welding prosperity.
Something of this I voiced to the
grim old millionaire who was respon
sible for at least part of It He was
propped np In bed in his East end
home, listening to the market reports
read by a nurse, and he smiled a little
at my enthusiasm.
1 can't see much beauty la It ay
self." he said. "But It's our badge of
i prosperity. The full dinner pail her
I means a nose that looks like a lac
Pittsburg without smoke wouldn't be
Pittsburg, any more than New York
prohibition would be New York. Sit
down for a few minutes. Mr. Blakcley.
Now. Hiss Gardner. Westlnghouse
Electric."
The nurse resumed her reading tn
a monotonous voice. She read liter
ally and without understanding, using
Initial and abbreviations as they came.
But the shrewd old man followed her
easily.
As the nurse droned along, I found
myself looking curiously at a photo
graph In a silver frame on the bed
side table. It was the picture of a
girl in white, with her hands clasped
loosely before her. Against the dark
background her figure stood out slim
and young. Perhaps It was the rather
grim environment, possibly It was my
mood, but although as a general thing
photographs of young girls make no
appeal to me. this one did. I found
my eyes straying back to It By a
little finesse I even made out the
name written across the corner. "All
son." Mr. Gllmore lay back among his
pillows and listened to the nurse's
listless voice. But he was watching
me from under bis heavy eyebrows,
for when the reading was over, and
we were alone, he indicated the pic
ture with a gesture.
"I keep It there to remind myself
that I am an old man." he sad. "That
Is my granddaughter. Alison West"
I expressed the customary rollte
surprise, at which, finding me respon
sive, he told me his age with a chuc
kle of pride. More surprise, this time
genuine. From that we went to what
ior itincnoon. ana men 10 nis reserve
power, which at 65 became a matter
for thought And so. In a wide circle,
back to where we started, the picture.
"Father was a rascal." John Gll
more said, picking up the frame. "The
happiest day of my life was when I
knew he was safely dead in bed and
not hanged. If the child had looked
like him. I well, she doesn't She's
a Gllmore, every Inch. Supposed to
look like me."
"Very noticeably," I agreed soberly.
I had produced the notes by that
time, and replacing the picture Mr.
Gilmore gathered his spectacles from
beside it. He went over the four notes
methodically, examining each care
fully and putting It down before
he picked up the next Then he
leaned back and took off his glasses.
"They're not so bad," he said
thoughtfully. "Not so bad. Rut 1
never saw them before. That's my
unofficial signature. I am inclined to
think" he was speaking partly to
himself "to think that he has got
hold of a letter of mine, probably to
Alison. Bronson was a friend of her
rapscallion of a father."
I took Mr. Gilmore's deposition and
put It into my traveling bag with tho
forged notes. When I saw them again,
almost three weeks later, they were
unrecognizable, a mass of charred pa
per on a copper ash tray. In the in
terval other and bigger things had
happened: The Bronson forgery case
bad shrunk beside the greater and
more imminent mystery of the man In
lower ten. And Alison West had come
Into the story and into my life.
(TO BE CONTINUED.)
I
rowed np to them and scooped them
In by the pailful.
1 have stood In a boat when the air
seemed literally full of fish, the tunas
coming up with a rush from below,
and endeavoring to catch the flying
fishes with tremendous leaps. Some
times they take them In midair;
again they strike and knock them
higher, bleeding or dead, or miss them
altogether. But whatever the result
the tuna Is never displaced: It makes
the same spectacular Jump, utterly
unlike that or the swordttsb. shark.
or tarpon, returning to the sea bead
first with a graceful curve.
Doings
tfTTHE
CPITL
Odd Answers to
WASHINGTON. One of the princi
pals la the Washington public
schools has been telling her friends of
some amusing Incidents of the final
examinations before the close of the
schools for the summer.
Among the questions she gave to
the children In the third grade was:
"Name the five races of man." Imag
ine her surprise when one tot an
swered: "Automobile races, horse
races, airship races, foot races and
bicycle races."
Another question was: "Name some
of the organs of men." To this one
child replied: "Mouth organ, hand
organ, pipe organ."
The spinal cord was defined as a
string running from the back of the
head to the bottom of the heels.
"Ears." said one. "are just as Impor
tant as good clothes and should he
taken care of just as well. Don't let
bugs crawl Into your ears, but If one
should get In there syringe your ear
with soap suds and afterwards drop
some molasses into It"
"Poison," wrote another, "should be
doctored at once and not allowed to
run on as it is dangerous. Don't treat
poison rough It Is liable to run Into
blood poison. If anyone should take
poison It Is a good idea to keep It as
high up out of reach as possible."
"You ought to keep poison in a little
W j SBB. aSBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBir 23VHaft3
Rural Free Delivery Is Growing Fast
THE rural free delivery service of
the United States means the dis
tribution of nearly 3.000.000 letters and
parcels annually along the highways
and byways of every state and terri
tory from Maine to Alaska. A force
of 41.000 carriers dally go over the
routes assigned to them, says a writer
in the Bookkeeper.
Bringing the mall to the farmer now
costs the nation I3C.000.000 a year In
salaries for the carriers, expense of
rxamining new routes, maintaining
postoffices. payments of Inspectors,
special agents, clerks and chiefs of
bureaus.
To secure Information to make
changes In routes and carriers, where
deemed necessary, to establish new
routes and to record and tabulate
statistics and data for the postmaster
general as well as for the public, a
force of only 110 persons Is required
in Washington, in spite of the great
amount of office work and correspond-
, ence that must be finished daily.
1 More than a million letters are re
ceived and answered by the depart
ment of rural free delivery in a year.
I Many of those received are merely ad-
. dressed to the department To save
Baseball and the
WASHINGTON had a "safe and
sane" celebration of the national
birthday. In years gone by the na
tional capital has been noted for the
noisiest Fourth of July celebration of
any city in the union. Last year they
adopted the "safe and sane" Idea.
Day fireworks and a parade in the
morning with speechmaking on the
plaza fronting the city buildings. In
the afternoon a motor parade and, at
night, an Illumination of the Monu
ment grounds and more fireworks.
The "safe and sane" Idea took well
it first and Washington determined to
stick by the modern form of celebra
tion this year. Therefore the celebra
tion last Monday began with the read
ing of the Declaration of Independence
in front of the city buildings. Ten
o'clock was the hour set, but. as luck
would have it the same hour tho Bos
Ion Red Sox and the Nationals
crossed bats. The Washington Post
and the Washington Time? have of
fices opposite the city building. A
crowd of about 1.000 people had gath
ered for the ceremonies. At the news
paper offices the megaphone men bad
been connected by wire with the base- J
ball park.
Why Burton Didn't
SINCE Senator Burton took his con
gressional Investigators or Euro
pean waterways abroad be has been
relating this one. The senator was in
Switzerland. In front of the hotel at
which he was stopping a mountain
climbing party was arranging for a
start to the top of one of the lesser
lplne peaks. The guide was as busy
as a bird dog nosing around, and
giving limitless advice and Instruction
in what to do and bow to do It
"Is he a thoroughly skilled climb
er?" asked the Obioan of the bote!
proprietor.
"Ah. zat he eez," exclaimed the bonl
face. "He have lost two partes of
7 tw ' JfcPF
Teachers' Questions
room under lock and key In a Ilttlt
bottle and the cork in so It can't bt
got out and hide the key and havt
skeleton on the bottle and not let no
body go In there."
"A good anty dote for poison," saM
one, "Is to take a teacupful of soai
suds every ten minutes to make yot
vomit till the doctor comes." (It it
awful to think of the doctor's belnj
delayed several hours.)
A class of six-grade pupils wen
asked to write a short blographlca
sketch of Longfellow. One membei
of the class proudly submitted tht
following:
"H. W. Longfellow was a granc
man. He wrote both poems and poetry
He graduated at Bowdoln and after
wards taught the same school when
he graduated. He dldnt like teachlnf
and decided to learn some other trade
so bis school furnished him money tc
go to Europe and learn to be a poet
He wrote many beautiful poems foi
children. He wrote "Billy, the Black
smith."
The following brief but pithy com
position was banded In by a young
ster who had been asked to write ot
his favorite holiday:
"I like the Fourth of July best 'caust
it's the day America was dlscov
ered."
A hasty look into a dictionary U
presumed to have conveyed to the
mind of one embryo cynic that "chart
ty" means "alum" Instead of "alms.
"Ambush" was defined as a kind oi
bush and "habitation" was judged tc
refer to one's habits. It was also de
elded that a "patriarch" wears feath
crs "same as any other bird."
time of opening and reading mlsslvet
not properly directed Is a part of thi
work of the mailing section. It In
dudes a private postofflce througl
which every letter received or sen
relative to rural delivery must pass.
Every one of the half-million ant
more letters sent from this depart
ment Is copied for record by a ms
chanlcal system which saves the labor
of a hundred copying clerks evei
where the band copying press or tht
carbon method has been employed, J
force of only seventeen clerks Is need
ed In this section, yet In addition t
handling and copying mail they keex
a dally record of all the outlay foi
postage expenses of the department
and sort and examine the hundreds nl
letters daily received which must be
returned to the postofflce where they
should have been directed.
What the service does In recelvinf
applications for new routes, petltionr
for carriers, decisions of the depart
ment, the payments and receipts, la
told by the postofflce newspaper.
The esprit de corps of the rural free
delivery is best shown by the last an
nual report During the year it-statea
that out of the 41.000 in the service
the total dismissals for cause were
only 165, less than the total number
of deaths.
The reasons for the dismissals wer
principally Incompetence and failure
to obey instructions. No dismissals
whatever for stealing from the maiU
or other dishonesty were on the re
ords.
Declaration
Promptly at ten o'clock a baldhead
ed man in a frock coat arose on the
flag draped stand in front of the city
building cleared his throat and be
gan: "When the course of human ev "
Across the way the megaphone man
Interrupted with:
"Milan is at the bat Ball one!"
"vents It becomes necessary," con
tinued the baldheaded reader.
"Foul 3trike one," roared the
megaphone.
The masculine portion of the listen
ers became restive. Their attention
turned in the direction of the mega
phone man and their backs toward
the baldheaded patriot
"for one people to dissolve the
poiit "
"He hits to left For two bases
Lellvelt at the bat
By this time 794 male members of
the Independence day audience had
dashed madly across to Newspaper
How. Of the original audience or the
"safe and sane" celebration. 134 wom
en 22 children, a salubriously Intoxi
cated cab driver and the police guard
remained.
"Lellvelt sacrifices Elberfeld
singles Milan scores."
"Hurrah! Wow! Wow!" bel
lowed the crowd and the remainder
or the reading or the glorious docu
ment was interspersed with "Good
boy. Doc!" "Oh. you Gabby Street!"
for 14 hot Innings.
But Boston won.
Climb Mountains
toureests down zee mountalne side,
and boze times he have come off
wlzout so mooch as zee one leetle
scratch."
Burton did not climb aay mountains
during bis sojourn.
Representative J. Harry Covington
of Maryland represents that section of
the Terrapin state known as tht
Eastern Shore. The Eastern Shore
Is famed for producing not only the
highest living In all America, but It
numbers among Its population many
of the highest livers.
"The most notable Instance of gour
mandizlng which our section has pre
duced," said Mr. Covington to a group
of newspaper friends, "is oM Joe
Nicholson of Talbott county. One of
Joe's friends asked bim If he liked
turkey.
" 'Sure I like turkey.' responded Old
Joe. 'But a turkey Is an inconvenient
sort of a bird. It's a Ieetle too much
fer one and not enough fer two.'"
LEADING MISTAKES IN LIFE
Writer Has Recorded Ten, ef Whisk
Meet ef Us Assuredly Have
Our Share.
Some of as may be glad to he tola
that there ere only tea life mistakes,
for there seen to be ee may mors,
but a recent writer has eatatoguef
them. Perhaps these are only the tea.
leading ones from which tas smaller
errors arise. Let's look over tas list
and see how many of these are oars:
First, to set up our owa standard of,
right and wrong aad judge people a
cordlngly; second, to measars tas sa
joyaieat of others by our ewa; third,
to expect aaif ormlty ef sissies la tats
world; fourth, to look fer Judgment
sad experience la youth; arte, to sa
dsavor to mold all dtepssttloas alike;,
sixth, to look for aerfestloa ai sa
ewa actions; seventh,0 to worry ear
sslvss sad others with wast saaast,
be remedied; eighth, to refuse to yield
la Immaterial matters; ninth, to re
fuse to alleviate, so far as It lies la
oar power, all which needs allevia
tion: tenth, to refuse to stake allow-
aacs fer tas laanalUss of
EPIDEMIC OF ITCH IN WELSH
VILLAGE
-la Dowlals, South Wales, aboat 1
teea years sgo, families were strich
sa wholesale by a dlsssss knowa ss
the itch. Believe me. It Is the most
terrible disease of Its kind that I
know of, ss it Itches sll through your
body sad makes your life sa Inferno.
Sleep is out of the suesUoa sad yoa
feel ss if a mlllloa mosaultoes were
attacking yoa at tho seats time. I
knew a dotea families that were ss
sleeted.
"The doctors did their beet, bat
their remedies were of ao avail what?
ever. Then the families tried a drug
gist who was noted far sad wide for
his remarkable cures. People cams
to him from all parts of the country
for treatment, but his medicine mads
matters still worse, ss a last resort
they were advised by a Mead to ass
the Cutlcura Remedies. I sm glad to
tell you that after a few days treat
ment with Cutlcura Boss. Ointment
and Itesolveat, the effect was woeder
ful and ths result was a perfect can
la all cases.
"I may add that my three Brothers,
three sisters, myself sad an ear fas
Hies havs beea users of tas Catteara
Remedies for flfteea years. Thomas
Hugh. 1CM West Haroa PL, Chicago
m, Jaas if. IMS -
ASY TO ANSWER.
Ths Teacher Who was it that
climbed slowly np ths ladder of sue
cess, carrying his burden with him as
hs went; who, when ho reached the)
top gazed upon those far hsaeath
him. and
The Scholar Caged I) I know
ma'am. It was Pat OTtourke, press
dent of the Hodcarriers naloa,
A Knowing Girl.
When young Lord Stanlelgh earn
to visit an American family, the mis
tress told the servants that la adi
dressing him they should always aj
"Tour Grace." When the young gea
tleman one morning met one ot th
pretty house servants la ths hallwaj
and told her that she was so sttrao
tlve looking he thought he would Um
her, she demurely replied, clasping,
her hands on her bosom sad looktaf
up into his facs with a heatlflo ea
pression. "O Lord, for this blesslna
we are about to receive, we thank
thee." Llpplncott's.
Mere Serious.
"Mathilda Browne was very rude ts
sn overdressed old womsa she met es
the street the other day."
"I know the story. The old woman
turned out to be Mathilda's very rich
aunt, and now she's going to give all
her money to a hospital for decrepit
dogs."
"Nothing of the sort. la fact, It'r
worse. The old woman was ths
Brownes' new cook and sow they
haven't any."
The Horns of the Cod.
There Is just one other great cod
bank In the world besides those off
Newfoundland. It lies off Cape Agul
has, which Is the southern tip of Af
rica, and south of the Cape of Good
Hope. The Agulhas plateau Is said to
be almost a duplicate la size and rich
ness of the north cod hanks. But this
Is too far off, so there is little promise
of Its appeasing the hungry appetite
of the world for cod.
For Breakfast
Post
Toasties
with cream tr milk
The smile that follows will
last all day
"Ths Mcasiy Uaf nM
Sold by Crecers.
Pkss.lOesad IS
tOSTUX CEKKAX CO.. US.
Bul Crack,:
yt jtf