The Columbus journal. (Columbus, Neb.) 1874-1911, November 27, 1907, Image 8

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ITS 1 M It OH
Columbus gets its first
installment of the
good to come from
the rich man's panic
Gerharz Flynn Co.
finds some parties very long on
goods and very short on cash and
In consequence Platte county peo
ple are eoinr to benefit several
points on their
Good wool underwear at less than
halt Men's cassimere shirts 20 to
30 off! Duck coats, boys' and
children's suits at panic prices.
In feet everything in this line gets
the knife to kind of equalize things
and enable the Gerharz-Flynn Co.
to send every customer away feel
ing that they have got a good deaL
lMU0.4 .
The carrier returned to duty Tuesday
after taking Km aanaal vacation of
fifteen daye.
Thanksgiving ia welooawd by the car
rier aa one of the holidays granted by
a the post otke department.
The new bog house being erected by
Gerrard and Willie k nearing completion
and ia quite an improvement.
The house on the Gerrard farm oc
cupied by A. Johnson, has been ander-
going a remodelling the last two weeks
The roof baa been raised and another
atory added, and the baildiog widened
ao that it makes a very good dwelling.
Walker.
e
A. P. Frederickaon and family visited
at John Swansoa v Sunday.
John Boad is building quite an addi
tioa to his residence so aa to make room
tor hie aon-ia-law.
Mm. M. Nelson who has been visiting
relatives oa the Looking Glass returned
on the evening train for St. Edward.
The Piano contest conducted by the
Newman Grove newspapers came off
Saturday night, and there was quite an
excitement for a while. Hiss Mabel
Olson ayoang lady of Walker township
was the winner.
The writer of this read in the Col nmbns
Telegram of last week that the'demoerats
ahoald stand up on their hind legs so as
to meet with better results in the presi
dential election next falL Maybe that is
a good way because those four legged
democrats that lived some years ago in
several towns between Columbus and
Genoa, when they aaw any danger ap
proaching they always stood up on their
hind legs, and it was said of them that
they were very hard to kill out.
Feed your cow some of that chopped
ear com, they like it. Scott's. .
TERRORS OF BALLOONING.
Nat to the Aeronaut, but to the Man
an Earth Belew Him,
It Mast be more than two years ago
that I called attention la this column
to the danger and nuisance that would
be likely to ensue If ballooning be
came popular, bat It la only recently
that the public have awakened1 to, the
fact that the possibilities mentioned
are likely to become atern realities.
Already we read of people quietly
lounging ia their gardens being well
nigh blinded by showers of sand, of
conservatories being smashed, of
houses unroofed and chimneys demol
ished, of trees uprooted, of fences
damaged and of cattle injured by the
action of the grapnel v
O course; aa ballooning becomes
general such accidents will be
sore frequent and more serious. An
iaeoasiderate aeronaut la far more dlf
flcult to catch and control than a road-
ke may DeroetaalA bu
from an lnaceeMihi ai.
It IB reallV hirta Him-hatm
this latest nuisance become, ao vast
as to be uncontrollable that atrin
ammt measaiea ahoald be taken for Its
suppression. -
- But, I suppose tin the prime minis
ter has been hooked by a grapllng
iron and dragged by the heels across
a plowed- leM and through a couple
eg quick-set hedges, nothing will .he
Grannie.
. The Latest Styles
-m-
CHRISTMAS
- AT v - .
HELWIG'S Stupid
PJLAGE TOUB ORDER EARLY
y
winter clothes.il
PUTTING HIS LOGIC TO TEST.
John Seemed to Have Made His Paint
but Ha Got Ne Chicken.
The old couple were eating their
first meal with their son after his re
turn from college.
'Tell us, John," said the father,
"what have you learned at college.'
"Oh, lots of things," said the son, aa
he recited his coure of studies.
"Then," he concluded; "1 also studied
logic"
"Logic," said the old man. "What
is thatr
It's the art of reasoning," said the
son.
"The art of reasoning?" said the
father. "What is that, my boy r
"Well replied the son, "let" me give
you a demonstration. How
chickens are oa that dish, father?"
"Two," said the old man.
"Well," said John, "I can prove
there are three." Then he stuck his
fork in one and said: "That is one,
isn't itr
"Yes," said the father.
"And this Is two?" sticking his fork
in the second.
"Yea," replied the father, again.
"Well, don't one and two make
three?" replied John, triumphantly.
"Well, I declare!" said the father.
"Ton have learned things at college.
Well, mother," continued the old man,
to his wife, "I will give you one of the
chickens to eat. and Til take the other,
and John can,have the third. How Is
hat. John V 'Judge's Tibninr.
Geese on n Cider Spree.
Martin Beck, a farmer on the Cone
wago hills, Is humiliated to admit
that three of his geese went on a
disgraceful spree after having eaten
some pulp from a cider mill.
Some time after the eating of the
pulp, the peculiar action of the fowls
attracted the attention of the farmer.
They swayed from side to side and
cackled hoarsely. Finally one by one
they fell limp and apparently dead.
Mrs. Beck carried the fowls Into the
house, with the intention of plucking
them,' when they revived.
Since then the geese have kept
away from the cider mill, and have
tried to prevent other geese from go
ing near it Philadelphia North
American.
Best Diamond Mine.
The Premies is by far the largest
and most valuable individual diamond
mine ever found In South Africa, and
it Is probably not an exaggeration to
say that i Us one of the most valuable
mines of any kind ever discovered in
the world. It is estimated that when
its full plant is at work it will make
profit at the rate of $9,648,000 a year,
the life, of the mine on this basis being
well over 60 years.
A Trust Case.
"Do you refuse to answer on the
ground that you might incriminate
yourselfr!
'TU' leave that to the court If 1
told the truth' I'd get a year. The
whole truth' would mean at. least ten
years, and 'nothing but the truth
would be life, sore."
So they Vated .him aa immune and
called a witness who knew nothing
of the case. Judge.
Another Preyerb Busted.
A Chicago horticulturist has pro
duced a cactus dahlia, thus reversing
Luther -Burbank's feat of dethroning
a cactus. We may yet gather fig
of thistles. Boston Herald.
PHOTOS
WAR AGAMST CMC
GOOD WORK DONE BY POSTAL
SERVICE.
Mighty Army Ever Engaged in Serv
ing and Protecting the Public
Swindling Advertisements
Detected and Barred. .
Just how much of its amazing de
velopment this vast country owes to
its postal service would take volume
to telL A mighty machine la this
whose pulsing-ia felt in every home
and place of "business, however re
mote, from Alaska to Florida. It is
served by a mighty army of 319.89S
employes, strategically disposed in
some 70.0M oflces, which handled last
year llCl,fl9.Clt separate nieces pi
It Is evident that to protect these
postal myriads, and to see that theii
units are not used for fraudulent pur
poses. Is the work of a Titan," who,
however, looms unobtrusively aa Post
master General George von L. Meyer
Crimes of all kinds connected with
the post office are published In a Jour
nal never seen by the ordinary public
the depredation bulletin of the serv
ice, which must be read by every sol
dier of the postal army under pain of
fine. And, aa you may suppose, the
work of what I may call the secret
service of the post omce, is immensely
interesting.
Monday morning, frequently brings
a startling wire to a state center
Tost office robbed last" night; safe
blown with guncottoa or nitroglycer
in." Aa Inspector is on the spot aa
fast as express trains will carry him.
And a stringent inquiry is begun on
the spot Occasionally suspicion falls
oa an inside man, who, if convicted, is
taken before the federal courts and
sentenced to at least three years. I
may mention here that every post of
fice in the country is periodically over
hauled by an expert and everything
from staff to stamps checked and
passed "All welL" And incidentally
all complaints against postmasters,
carriers and clerks are sifted, for
charges more or less well founded are
often laid against these for Intoxica
tion, laziness, loitering; carelessness
or downright dishonesty.
But the fraudulent use of the malls
through swindling, advertisements is
vastly more difficult on account of
legal technicalities and flaws of which
swindlers know so well how to avail
themselves. John Hill, Jr., of the Chi
cago board of trade, estimates that
every year the people of the United
States contribute the enormous sum
of $100,000,000 to get-rlch-qulck and
"safe investment" swindlers alone.
All classes are affected, from the
laundress to the lawyer, clergyman
and merchant There are victims in
the cities, on farms, ranches and plan
tations, and in every hamlet and little
village. For distance is swiftly
bridged by the United States mail and
the public's money flows freely and
quickly through that gigantic artery.
Only the other day an enterprising
"seed" merchant was sentenced to a
year's imprisonment and a fine of $500.
Amateur florists an over the country
had for years been receiving gorgeous
colored catalogues from him and In
every case he annpunced the discovery
of a rare and marvelous flower and he
agreed .to send a small quantity of the
precious seed for one dollar a package
In the first flush of enthusiasm few
amateurs let such a chance go by.
Even professional florists subscribed
On each package was the usual trade
notice that no guarantee could be
given as to germinating power, but as
such a notice Is quite usual in the
trade few buyers balked.
Much anxious watching, careful
watering and. weeding availed nothing,
however, and for the most part the
gardeners- concluded their methods
were too crude for so exotic a flower.
A New York woman thought other
wise. On receiving her packet she
took it to an expert and found that
the priceless "seed" of that wondrous
bloom consisted entirely of palm leaf
fans crushed Into seedlike-fragments.
Science Studies Your Baby.
Science takes a large and compre
hensive Interest In modern babies and
baby-statistics, says the September
Delineator. i
The average weight of boy babies at
birth Is seven pounds; girls about six
and a half pounds. During the first
three days the child loses weight; aft
er It ia a week old it steadily In
creases. A child should increase in weight
two. pounds for every addition of an
rnch in height between three and four
Teet, and two and one-half pounds for
every inch between four and five feet.
The healthy baby triples its weight
at birth in one year, doubles this in
3ix years, quadruples this weight in
13 years, and at 21 a man weighs 21
times his weight at birth;
Better Than Steel Safe.
0
Iron safes being difficult to obtain
and his subjects being in many cases
adroit-thieves, the king of Anam some
time ago -resorted to the ingenious
method of safeguarding his treasures,
la the interior of his palace the king
caused a huge tank to be constructed,
which he kept constantly filled with
water. Several teak logs were bored
out,, and ia the holes he packed his
Jewels and treasures. The holes were
then closed and the logs put into the
tank. A number of large crocodiles
were placed In the tank and -kept on
short rations, so that any thief who
.attempted, to get at the treasures
would be a tempting meal.
WISCONSIN PEARL HUNTING.
Digging Clams far the Valuable Gam
Twenty Yeara'Ago.
Twenty years 'ago a pearl erase
started ia Wisconsin, Every one dug
says Outing Magazine. Mills
the water waa drawa
the mm penes that the people
get the musssls more eaefy.
to 1196, accordiag to the
report, $300,000 worth off
were foaad to
At that
net valued aa
bat aew they
highly m
are eagerly
it by Jewelers. Sav
age batten factories4! were
at various polnta oa the
Mississippi river. Mea collected clams
aad sold the shells to these factories
to fee made into pearl buttons. Some
found and another craze
Socked td the river
from all walks, of Hfe. White mea.
red amov black mea, brown men and
women, an came, though after a
month of ana.Srind aad river water
coffee, racial characteristics were-not
In the summer of 1902 it was said
that lO.tet mea were clamming on
the Mississippi aad its tributaries. In
the spring of the aext year the rash
greater, but this did not last
Owing to the crerashlng of the
previous aeaaoa, the market twas al
ready overstocked aad the price of
shells had dropped so low that by
July comparatively few boats were
at work. Many enormous beds that
were thought to bes Inexhaustible had
given oat, the buyers rejected so
many (only about a quarter of those
caught were salable, even at the lat
ter part of the aeaaoa) the river was
almost deserted.
MEXICANS IN TEXAS SCHOOLS.
Children of Wealthy Families Educat
ed bi San Antonio.
Ten carloads of school children from
Mexico have arrived In this city since
the Influx began about two weeks ago,
sayshe San Antonio Express.
Scores of them were accompanied
by their parents, and the hotels of, the
city have been indebted, in no small
degree, to this class of visitors for the
brisk conditions which have been ex
perienced by them during the last sev
eral weeks.
Many of the children traveled from
their distant homes alone or in pairs
or trios, while it was no uncommon
sight to- see parties of nine or ten
from the same localities across the
Rio Grande at the various hotels.
Nearly all the school equipment and
wearing apparel for the entire year are
purchased for these children here In
San Antonio before they enter their
respective schools, and the commer
cial Importance of their annual visit
can easily be imagined.
Their parents,' too, before returning
home, spend several days in the city,
purchasing large quantities of Ameri
can goods to take back withthem to
Mexico, and aa the majority of them
are persons of great wealth and social
position at home, their expenditures
amount to thousands of dollars.
Of all the children from Mexico who
are educated In the United States the
schools of San Antonio secure over
70 per cent Not only on account of
the proximity of the city to the bor
der, but also because of the general
excellence of the schools and the
healthful climate and surroundings ex
perienced here. San Antonio has al
ways been the favorite place with the
Mexicans for their children to obtain
an English education.
LIMITED FOOD SUPPLY.
There
la Not the Great Variety We
Generally Imagine.
"Certain great food-staples have
proved themselves within the age
long experience of humanity to pos
sess a larger amount of nutritive val
ue, digestibility, and other good quali
ties, and a smaller proportion of un
desirable properties than any others.
These, through an exceedingly slow
and gradual process of the survival
of the fittest, have come to form the
staples of food in common use by the
human race all over the world. It is
'really astonishing how comparatively
few there are of them, when we come
to consider them broadly; the flesh
and the milk of three or four domestic
animals, the flesh of three or four and
the eggs of one species of domesti
cated birds, three great grainswheat,
rice and maize and a half-dozen
smaller and much less frequent ones,
one hundred or so species of fishes
and shell fish, two sugars, a dozen
or ao starch-containing roots and tu
bers, only two of which the potato
and the manioc are of real interna
tional importance, twenty or thirty
fruits, forty or fifty vegetables make
up two-thirds of thefood supply of
the Inhabitants of the world.
"Instead of wondering at the var
iety and profuseness of the human
food supply, the biologist Is rather in
clined to ejaculate with the London
footman Immortalized by John Leech,
who, when told by the cook that there
would be mutton chops for dinner and
roast beef for supper, exclaimed:
'Nothing but beef, mutton and pork
pork, mutton and beef! Hin my opin
ion, hit's 'igh time some new hanimal
waa In wen ted!'"
. "No News In the Paper."
Frequently you pick up one of the
local papers, and after glancing at the
headlines wearily, thrust it aside, re
marking: "Nothing in the paper to
day." Did you ever stop to think what
that phrase "nothing In the paper to
day" means? It means that in the
day or week just passed that no mis
fortune has befallen any one In our
city; that no firehas wiped out a
neighbor's worldly goods; that the
grim angel of death has crossed no
threshold' of a friend; that no man,
driven by Uquor, hatred or Tear has
taken the life of a feUowman; that
ao poor devil, haunted by the past or
the misdeeds of some other, has
crossed the great divide by his own
hand. So the aext time you pick up a
paper that doesn't announce a tragedy,
give a little thanks instead of grunt
ing because there to no news. Ne
vada MaU.
Some FemlnTne Snap Shots."
The doUarless man Is still a million
aire if he hath not been robbed of his
Experience is life's queer merchan
dise that we buy with gray hair aad
shattered mustons.
She that stints her heart to feed her
braia wttl sooner or later die of star-
The Jealous wife shouldn't try to lay
the ghost of her husband's first love.
No auui remembers any woman that
TELEPHONY WITHOUT WIRI
There le a Peaamlllty of TaNnem to
Wireless telagraphy la at mat aa
established fact feetl
aad commercially.
A director of the
radio-telegraphy company told a re
porter that hie company ia ready to
take orders for the Installation- of' a
wireless telephony system to cover a
distance up to 25 miles, over fairly
flat land or over water.
"Recently," he said, "I apoke la oar
laboratory- at Berlin to a temporary
laboratory which we' have erected
some seven miles away from that
dty, and that waa apt aader the heat
conditions, because the aerial (or
wire) at the' temporary station waa
suspended between two factory shafts
instead of the usual masts.
"From experiments which we have
been conducting in Berlin we are able
to guarantee perfect communication
by wireless telephony over 25 miles
of not too hilly country.
"The inventor of the continuous
undamped wave, by waich-means only
la wireless- telephony madd possible,
waa M. Valdemar Pouhtea, a noted
Danish electrical engineer. About
eight montha ago we bought M. Poul
sea's invention, together with all his
plant and experimental atattoaa, and
we have' secured patents' for the whole
world with the exception of the
United States.
"We are now converting oar sta
tions at Oxford and Cambridge into
wireless telephony stations oa the
Paulsen system, and when the work
ia completed, which win probably be
In six weeks' time, we ahaU begin to
experiment there. I am confident that
we shall be successful ia establishing
wireless telephonic communication
over the SO miles which separate the
two university towns, aad I do not
hesitate to express my conviction that
In a few years' time we shall be able
to speak across the Atlantic" Lon
don Express.
SURNAMES NOT USED BY KINGS.
Only Christian Names Signed
y
Members of Royal Hi
The origin of most royal houses was
similar throughout Europe, and kings
and then- famines, speaking broadly,
never had or used surnames. They
signed their Christian names alone.
So universally waa this the- case
that it became rigid etiquette that a
person of royal birth should not use a
surname, though there have been num
bers of cases of dynasties, like our
own Stuarts, like, the Bernadotte dy
nasty of Sweden or like the Bonaparte
family, who unquestionably and In
dubitably had Inherited surnames. But
it has always been a puzzle why the
cadet members of our own royal
house do not subscribe themselves aa
peers by their peerage designations,
as do other peers.
However, the met is they do not,
but it has not been discovered what
are the rules which govern their sig
natures. The sovereign signs by the
Christian name and usually adds "R."
or "R. and I." Princes and princesses
sign by their Christian names and
sometimes, bnt not always, add the
letter "P." When or why this ia added
or omitted is not known.
But the habits of royalty lead oth
ers Into strange happenings. There
was an occasion upon which Queen
Victoria after a "function" was asked
to sign a visitor's book. Her majesty
write "Victoria B, andXl." Princess
Henry of Battenberg then wrote
"Beatrice P." The turn of the local
mayoress came next and she signed
"Elizabeth." The surname was hastily
written in the following day, but too
late to prevent the story gaining cur
rency. Alligators In Ecuador.
A aew minor Industry that is devel
oping in Ecuador Is the killing and
skinning of alligators. This industry
was launched in 1903 by aa American,
who went to Guayaquil for the pur
pose of hunting down the myriads of
alligators which abound in the River
Guayaa aad its tributaries. He was
markedly successful. The business
waa temporarily Interrupted In the
early part of 1905 by the untimely
death of the American, who had start
ed the fun, but it has recently been
resumed. The total value of the alli
gator skins exported during the years
1903, 1904, 1905 and 190S was $35,009.
The skins shipped from Ecuador to
this country last year weighed 57,000
pounds, and were valued at $4,873.
N. O. Times-Democrat.
Air Navigation Engines.
Tea or 15 years ago authorities writ
ing oa the subject stated that if only
it were possible to make engines so
light as to weigh but ten pounds a
horsepower, there would be sfc diffi
culty In constructing a flying ma
chine. A few years after, petrol en
gines were made of such weight To
day they are made and'On- the mar
ket, weighing no more than two aad
one-half pounds a horsepower. Tech
nical Literature.
A Necklace Which Brlnge III Luck.
An eerie story is told about a neck
lace which formerly belonged to the
Maharannee of Cooch Behar,- India,
and which ia supposed to bring bad
fortune to every one connected with
it
The history of the necklace
pearls aad turquoises, which are not
usually considered to be unlucky
stones ia certainly peculiar. While
it waa in the Mahmnnee'a possessioa
she was robbed of a quantity of valu
able Jewelry, and the Mararajah lost
some of his best racing ponies by
death and breakdowns. The advice of
a pundit waa sought. He Drescribed
a change of ownership aad a voyage
across the sea' ia order to break the
spell, aad the necklace was according
ly given to a lady ia England, says
Woman's life.
As a result the fcnfrh has be-
ua to wia races agaia aad the
haraanee has recovered the
property, bat the atory goes that the
present owner of the necklace has
been the .victim of persistent ill for
tune from the day that ft aajat mf
a - - - - .. 7v -- - .-. .-
V.
A E have opened a new motto
V V store in the Landoti ltirni
ture store on Eleventh street and
will handle a complete line of first
class pianos. Our prices defy all
competition. Remember we are per
manently located in Ctotambu.
BECKER BROS.
HENRY J. BECKER Manager
sTra
NORWAY'S BOY CLAIRVOYANT.
Traced a
Body to a River, Says a
London Report.
An extraordiny case of clairvoyance
by a child has caused considerable
interest here, telegraphs our-Christian-
ia correspendent. About a fortnight
ago a man living in the Oesterdal val
ley disappeared suddenly from his
home, and all search proved vain.
.The child, John Floettnm, 14 years of
age, was sent for eight days after the
man's disappearance.
The boy walked around the house
where the man bad lived and got a
photograph of him, which he carefully
examined. Sitting at a table, with his
left hand covering his eyes, he drew
some Hues on a slip cf paper, the lines
indicating where the man had walked.
The psrspi ration poured down the
boy '8 lace, and he often stopped.
When at last he "saw" a place where
the man had sat down under a big
tree, he was exhausted and had to
give up for the day.
People were sent out to search, with
the boy's sketch as their guide. The
whole population of the district fol
lowed, and excitement was high as the
crowd followed the course the man
had taken, step by step, as indicated
by -the boy. Night came on before
they reached the tree, and the search
was adjourned till next day, when the
boy himself led the party.
He took them to the tree, and there
found the lost man's handkerchief.
From the tree the boy went straight
to a river, but again he became so
exhausted that he had to give up.
However, as soon as he came home he
said he could plainly "see" where the
man was.
Early next morning the search
party, with the boy, took a boat,
which was steered according to the i
boy's directions. After a while he j
suddenly rose aad said. "Here he lies."
A search was made and the body was
found at the bottom of the river on
the very spot the boy had pointed out.
The boy only three months ago dis
covered that he possessed this ex
traordinary sense of clairvoyance.
During this time he has given many
proofs of his strange power. A man
went to him and told him that he had
lost a gold ring in a field last autumn
as he was loading hay on a cart, and
the boy soon told the man that the
ring could be found among the hay on
his farm, pointing out the very place,
where the ring was immediately
found. The boy has achieved other
feats equally remarkable.
Monkey.
Monkey was the name of a diminu
tive slave who was the pet of Andrew
Jackson. Monkey was a Jockey and
a Judge of horse flesh, and if Old
Hickory had any weakness at all it
was for horse flesh. Because of him
any victories on the turf. Monkey was
permitted many privileges, one of
which was to indulge his firm con
viction that the two greatest men on
earth in the order of their greatness
were Andrew Jackson and Monkey.
A man named Brown who was op
posed to the Jackson wing of the par
ty hi Tennessee had the temerity to
offer himself for governor. He re
ceived only a handful of votes. A
few days after the contest was settled
Mr. Brown was in the market at Nash
ville. Monkey was also there, with
a big basket oa his arm. Monkey
so carried the basket as to push Mr.
Brown of the sidewalk. The irate
politician raised his cane and shout
ed: "Don't you know who I am?
How dare you push me?" The Uttle
negro looked up Innocently and cried:
"WeU, if it ain't dat Mars' Brown
wat dun made a little 'speriment for
guvnor, Jea a little 'speriment."
OM Turkieh Jake.
Among the many anecdotes related
of the old Turkish Joker, Nasir-Eddin-Khodja,
is the following: Khodja
went one evening to the well to draw
water; and looking down to the bot
tom he saw the moon. Quickly he
ran into the house. and got a rope
THE MUSICAL EVENT OF THE SEASON
Til Btstii Mill
Ciiic Optra
UMHIV n,
IIMIIII
On Might My, Wsi., Dsc. 4th.
Fanny Cornroedians, Clever Soabrettes, Up-to-date
Specialties, Gorgeous Costumes aid Flccuit
Stage Settings. Friesi 25, 36 aad MeoW
Seats Now On Sale at PoUocki Drugstore
with a hook attached to the end ef R.
This he lowered Into the well. The
hook caught fast on a stoae. IThodJa
pulled desperately, the hook gave way
and there waa the joker flat ea hie
back staring up into the sky.
"Upon my soul," he exclaimed, per
ceiving the moon. "I have had a bad
fall, but I have pat the mooa back la
Its place."
Reyarrjra Cava,
Cats-hold as high a place i
in the hearts of our society
lovers, ijueen Alexandra o
era! fiae chinchillas aad Persian cats.
Princess Alexander of Teck
Prince Maurice of Battenberg
possess valuable specimens, bat the
real cat fancier among the royal fam-
ily is Princess Victoria of Schleawig
Holstein. and the only royal cattery
is the one now established at fiimsi i
land lodge. This has been arranged
on the most up-to-date principles, and
has curtained wlndowr aad a front
door with a knocker aad letter box.
The portals are surmounted by a
crown aad the initials "V. S. H."
The Firs
Riding oa a broad pad strapped ea a
horse's back ia very old;
riding is comparatively aew. It
no longer ago than 1954. oa the Fourth
of July, that E. R Waahbara'a drees
playiag la Boston, was packed to suf
focation by the aaaouaeeaseat. seat
broadcast, that oa this particular day,
for the first time hi the history ef the
world, a man would ride three times
around the ring standing upright oa
the bare back of a galloping horse!
The rider. Robert Afaaar. actually ac
complished this feat, and also he ear
led an-American flag, which he waved
uncertainly, thereby arousing tre
mendous enthusiasm. Contrast that
with the present, when there are
scores 'of riders who can turn a somer
sault on horseback. A clever bey can
be taught ia about three days to stand
up on a horse and ride around the
ring Everybody's.
.1,200 Eggs Equal One Man.
A German scientist asserts that an
i the material required to make up the
body of a man weighing 150 pound
can be found hi the whites and yolkc
of 1,200 hens' eggs.
The remarkable combiaatlea ef sub
stances of which eggs are made a
may be realized by the same scientist's
analysis of what the bevy ef aa aver
age man consists.
The list to aa foUowa: Sufficient
iron to make sevea large nails, suffi
cient fat for 14 pounds of randies,
phosphorus enough for some thoa
sands of matches, 20 teaspooafahi et
salt, 50 lumps of saga
quantity of soap.
In addition, there is
to make a few thousand crayons, and
the final item to a large bucketful oi
water.
HWItsMrty
It Is certain that humanity
hi the
particular characteristic of a
mind; little vicious minds are fuH et
anger and revenge and are Inrapablo
of feeling the exalted pleasure of tor
giving their enemies and ef bestow.
ing marks, of favor and generosity
upon those of whom they have gottea
the better. Lord Chesterfield.
I vVCJftfX K lrvdl
"How did he come to
propose to
her?"
"She coaxed her chum to ten him
confidentially that she had overheard
her say she would not accent him
If he did propose." Houetoa Peat
Netm
Enrico Toseili, the Italiaa
wno was married in Loadoa to
tess Moatignoso, the divorced wife ef
me crown pnnce of Saxony, now KJaa
Frederick Augustus of Saxony, aaa re
fused an offer made aim by a Haav
burg impresario to give Ave concerts
for $2,400, saying he had not mar
ried his wife to use her as aa adver
tfMtmenr, .
aad a asmaH
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