The Columbus journal. (Columbus, Neb.) 1874-1911, November 04, 1903, Image 1

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VOLUME XXXIVJ NUMBER 31.
THE HORRORS OF WAR
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When Japan znd Russia Ready Get Busy It Will Be a Terrible 3low to the
Reading Public
Minneapolis Journal
PARTINGOF WAYS
WHAT A HALIFAX PUBLICATION
HAS TO OFFER.
THE ALASKA BOUNDARY AWARD
Dissatisfaction of Canadians Over
Same is Unanimous. Present Rela
tions With England. It is Asserted.
Must End.
HALIFAX. X S. The declaration
that present relations between Can
ada and Great Britain cannot exist
much longer -xas made Wednesday by
the Halifax Chronicle the leading
newspaper supporter in the mancne
provinces of the liberal party In an
unusually outspoken editorial on the
recent Alaska boundary award, the
Chronicle expresses what is claims to
be unanimous dissatisfaction of Ca
nadians at the action of the 3ritish
government in the matter The paper
says-
"This Alaska episode has made it
clear that our existing relations can
not be continued much longer. We are
even now ar the parting of the ways.
Our subordinate position has been so
clearly and so humiliating revealed
that it must speedily bocome utterly
unendurable.
The Chronicie adds that there are
now only two courses open for Can
ada, complete legislative Independ
ence wirhin. the empira. acknowledg
ing the sovereignty of the Inng of
England alcne. or the status of an in
dependent nation. The paper says
there is much to commend the latter
steD in particular because it would
free Canada from the danger of ever
becoming embroiled with the United
States on account of its European con
nection, and at the same time would
secure for the dominion th beneSt
of the protection of the Monroe doc
trine. LOXDOX Chief Secretary for Ire
land Wyndhm. speaking at Dover,
said that unless England was pre
pared to lose her prestige, she could
not afford to see Canada dominated
by American capital "Under fis
cal reforms, as proposed by Mr
Chamberlain." said Mr Wyndham.
"Canada could become the granary of
Great Britain." He strongly urged
the linking of Canada directly with
the mother country This, he said,
must be done, whether it be accom
pished by Mr Chamberlain's method
or by some other
Walsn Gets Ten Years.
MAXILA Lieutenant James W.
Walsh, constabularly supply officer.
stationed at Mashate. in the province
of Tiscayas. military department of
Luzon, convicted recently of embez
zlement of SLOOO of government funds,
has been sentenced to ten years' im
prisonment. San Antonio Quarantined.
AUSTTX. Tex. Governor Tjihin
on Saturday quaraatinec all Texas
again San Antonio on account of the
yellow fver there. The order is
mandatory upon all railroads to oper
ate no trains o cr out of San An
tonio, j
Re-Argument of Oregon Land Case.
WASHIXGTOX. D. C The United
States supreme court ordered a re-argument
in the case of the United
States versus the California and Ore
gon Land company, involving the
land granted to the state of Oregon
in 1S64 to aid in the construction of
a wagon read from Eugene City
across the Cascade mountains to the
eastern boundary of the state. The
case already has been argued twice
in the supreme court.
American Arrested in Hungary.
BUDA PEST Adolph" Friedman.
as. American, has been arrested at,
the instance cf the United States an-,
thorities. on the charge of fraudulent!
bankruptcy in Xew York.
Marking the BattiefieMs.
VICKSBTJRG.- Miss. The Vlcks
hurg battle park cemmissianers of
Iowa are here engaged im marking the
yytrtnn occupied br Iowa troops
during the siege.
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ENTERS PROTEST.
Attorney Barrett Surprised at Being
Disbarred.
' WASHIXGTOX. Harrison J. Bar-
! rett. whose disbarment from practice
j before the Postoface department for
alleged wrongful acts, disclosed by
I the general postal investigation, was
j announced last week, has written a
letter to the postmaster general un
; der date of Baltimore. October 27,
' in which he expresses surprise in
view of the fact that he has been
furnished no specification of charges
and has been given no hearing. The
letter says the writer invited a search
ing investigation of all his acts, and
i was assured a hearing and an oppor
tunity to meet any accusations
against him. He says he furnished
i the inspctors all information asked
I of him, though much of its was irrel
evant, notwithstanding he was satis-
j fled they were seeking his indictment.
The letter adds:
j "My right to practice my profes
sion is one of which I ought not and
cannot properly be divested without a
, full and impartial hearing according
' to law. The government has pre
ferred its charges against me in the
. courts and I am ready and anxious
to meet them; indeed. I am glad of
the opportunity to put this matter in
its true light before a court and to
show that the allegation that I en
tered into an unlawful conspiracy
with General Tyner. a man who has
1 lived nearly eighty years respected
and honored among men. and presid
ed over the department now in your
charge, is as absurd as it is false."
Secretary Hitchcock, who has been
ill with a cold, was at his desk Tues
day for the first time since the mid
dle of last wek. His first act was to
order the suspension of Asa B.
Thompson, receiver of public moneys
at the land office at La Grande. Ore.,
who was indicted yesterday on the
charge of bribery "And there will
be others." he said, "whenever Sim
ilar circumstances are discovered in
connection with them." He declined
to say more concerning the reported
frauds in connection with the public
lands than that they are receiving
careful attention and have been since
January S last, when the secretary
said the investigation was besran. He
also said that proceedings have been,
started against Miss Ware, who is a
commissioner of deeds and is charged
with issuing certificates in 300 cases
of fraudulent land entries.
Mere Indictments at Basin.
DCXVER, Colo. A special from
Basin City. Wyo.. says: The grand
jury concluded its work on Wednes
day and was discharged. Eight addi
tional indictments were found in con
nection with the German and Wal
ters lynclung. but as the arrests have
not been msie the names are with
held. The bonds for Pat lock and Sa
bin have been placed at 110.000 each.
The men are still in jail.
Roots Are Coming Home.
LOXDOX Secretary of War Roct
and Mrs. Root will be passengers on
tne Celtic, which is to sail from Liv
erpool October 30 for Xew York.
Contraband Chinese Caught.
PORT TOWXSEXD. Wash. Four
teen contraband Chinese and Harry
Thomas and Fred Anderson, the white
men who were piloting them into the
country, were arrested en San Juan
island on Thursday. They were
brought here Friday and will be ar
raigned Saturday. Thomas and An
derson are entirely unknown to the
customs officers, who are thoroughly
acquainted with the smuggling frater
nity. Have a Hs.rrarz Escape.
CHICAGO. EL A dispatch from
Centralia. EL. says: W. K. Vander
bilt. John Jacob Aster, General Man
ager Harahan and other members of.
the Illinois Central railroad narrowly
escaped injury in -an accident to their
special train at Carbondale. EL
Through a misunderstanding another
train undertook to leave a side track
as the special came along. Two
coaches of the special were sid
swiped.'
, . -irTrr1T7r''-t'fcJ't'te snf TiTiilsl I mm ill Tin 1 i'ilTsftV'rBlTaniimrsTrrn'" -' '" l Anssfif-ilnnt'"i ilii If 'ffisTrat jajjtsf'Yr
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ALASKAN AWARDS
THE BOUNDARY COMMISSIONERS
HAVE NOT MUCH TO SAY.
VUMTIISNSSmrMTTEi
VancMvr RteorM Hew He Reached
Paint and Commit isn Made Oeduc
tien United States Gets Two 11-
ay the Agreement.
NEW YORK On account of his
oftcial connection with the Alaskan
ttibunal Senator Lodge of Massachu
setts declined to discuss the award of
the tribunal on his arrival here by the
steaaur Cedric.
Senator Lodge said the members of
the tribunal had been very hand-
sonMiT treated im London, bat as one
or tne arbitrators he couid not even wild seem to require a systematic,
venture to say that he was satisfied substantial and immediate effort on
with the award and declined to say i the part of the people generally. Dip
anything about the attitude of the iomatically, the problem would be an
Canadian commissioners in refusing extremely delicate one, and would re
to sign the award. quire discretion and experience for
Joseph Pope, representative of the I its successful solution."
Canadian government, and one of the
assistant secretaries of the tribunal, T0 CONSIDER RACE RRORLEM.
who also was on Cedric said that the
award was of course a disappointment
from the Canadian point of view, but
offered no farther comment, appr
Ing anxious, however, to ascertain Liw
the decision had been received in
Canada.
Former Senator Turner of "Washing
ton, another American member of the
tribunal was not willing to discuss
how the agreement came to be
reached, but 't was admitted that the
decision giving two islands in the
Portland canal to the Unieed States
was based on Vancouver's narrative
of his voyage of exploration. The
question hinged an whether he had
called fh arafir tn fha nnfi nf rho
island the channel or whether he had
gone to the north of them. It was
found that he recorded having gone
from the entrance to a point of land
above the islands in a certain time.
To do this it was figured that he en
tered the broad channel, followed it
up, and turned in betwn the four
islands.
This led the commissioners to de
cide that tne two islands lying near
the mouth of the canal and opposite
Port Simpson belonged to the United
States. Mr. Turner, while he was not
willing to discuss in detail the sub
ject, admitted that this was true.
LOXDOX. Chairman MacRae, at a
meeting of the stockholders of the
White Pas A Tukon railroad, alluded
tc the Alaska boundary award. He
said that while he regretted the decis
ion which placed twenty miles of their
railroad under the jurisdiction of the
American flag, it was in
eality more i
a matter of sentiment than business. cf the Mad Mullah near Hlig, in Ital
The reciprocal bounding arrange- . ian Somaaliland:
ments between Canada aad the United
States would continue. Both coun
tries would suffer equally by a dis
turbance of the arrangements, and it
was more in harmony with the enlight
ened spirit of civilization to extend
than to curtail them.
HUSBAND DELIVERS ADDRESS.
Eulogy of Mrs. Booth-Tucker Pro
nounced by Commander. j
CHICAGO Surrounded by 3.000 ,
Salvation mourn jrs who had gather-
cd at Princess rink Friday night to
pay tribute to the memory o Mrs. '
I
Emma Booth-Tucker, who was kill
ed in a railroad wreck Wednesday !
night. Commander Booth-Tucker, in j
a sermon full of pathos, told of the
many good deeds performed by the ,
dead leader. While speaking the ,
husband, grief stricken and weeping,
stood at the head of the casket.
When the eulogy was finished there
was not a dry eye in the audience.
The memorial services were dot- ( here on December wheat have assum
ticipated in by many prominent offi- ed fictitious values,
cers of the army. At the conclusion , The beard was asked to grant re
of the ceremonies the casket was re- lief. President Ballard refused to
moved to the Pennsylvania depot aad make any state further than to say
started to Xew York. ' he would announce to the exchanro
Millionaire Hoanland Dead.
ST. JOSEPH. Mo. George T Hoag
land. pioneer and millionaire philan
thropist, is dead at his home in rftia
city. Mr. Hoaglaad was 90 years old
and gave liberally to local charities
and to Methodist educational institutions.
i with the president. He discussed
China Sees Pease Ahead. j with him the Cuban reciprocity legis
PfcKiXG The Chinese minister at lation to be taken up" at tile extra
St. Petersburg telegraphs that while ' ordinary session of -ongress nest
the war party has been dominant for president on the award of the Alas
a long time, he believes a peace sea- , kan boundary commission,
timent is beginning to prevail.
I Is Murdered by Burglars.
Asks Ssain to Pay Sac the Money. I VTXCEXNES, Ind. William J. En-
SAX JUAX. P. R. Secretary of gle. secretary of the Vincennes Dis-
State Haj has informed Governor J tilling company, and a prominent-
Hunt that he has instructed the Uni- business n, was shot at his home
ted States minister at Madrid. Arthur
S. Hardy, to claim the $40,000 for
Porto Rican school pensions, seized
by Spain in the San Juan bank after
the American occupation cf Porto j
Rico aad daring the armistice which j
preceded Spain's
from the island.
final withdrawal
Mercer Denies the Charges-
SALT LAKE CTTY-Captain W. A.
Mercer, who is mentioned in the suit
.
of the government brought at Fergus
Falls. Minn, against the Common-r
wenlth Lumber ccmTnny for timber
alleged to have been unlawfully tak-
en from the government land, is now f
stationed at the Uintah Indian reser-1
Tstian, in northwestern Utah. Captain j
Mercer telegraphed, denying chargse
of irregalnriry is. r -n with his
im Mmmancta. j
COLUMBUS, NEBRASKA.
APPEAL TO CLARA BARTOW.
Red Cr
Aid
WASHINGTON.
for aid im her distress
before Miss Clara, Barton, the aeai at
tie Americas Association of the Bed
Cross. Conatantxne Stepaanove, the
special Macedonian delegate, tsM
Miss Barton of the urgency of the
situation, and begged her to take fam
mediate action to insure the forward
ing of Red Cross relief to Macedonia.
Miss Barton asked for detailed tar
iiuiuwuuu ma iu uic cuvaciu: sou
scope of the aid needed, and said:
j "The RC Cross feels that it wonld-
be a humane and noble thing; for the
American people to undertake to re
lieve the suffering in Macedonia.
Such a movement would be in. keep
rag with American traditions in all
similar emergencies. The situs fins.
' in view
of the approach of
Conference to Be Held at Washington
in November.
WASHIXGTOX Commenang: Mon
day, Xovember 9, and continuing for
three days, there will be held in this
city an interesting conference on the
race problem in the United States.
Many prominent leaders In the color
' ed race have promised to attend the
cenforence, which is to be held un
der the auspices of the Xatlonal So
ciological society, an organization for
i the study of the condition of the coi-
ored people. The object of the con
ference is stated to be to "deliberate
on the most serious phases of the
,' nCe F1. " formuiate laM
for the relief of a strained situation
brought about by the presence of the
serious problem to discover some
common ground on which all of the
triends of the cause may stand, and to
adjust the different and divergent
views respecting the solution of the
problem into a definite and harmoni
ous proposition."
I The conference will also consider
the religious, educational, physical
, aad ethical aspects of the race ques
t tion and considerable time will be
spent in discussing the evif influence
of urban life on the colored people.
BOMBARD THE MAD MULLAH
Italian Cruii
r Has a
rush ht
maliland.
ROME The government has re
ceived the following information con
cerning the engagment between the
Italian cruiser Lombardia and forces
i "Owing to the close watch kept on
the Scmalliland coast by British and
Italian ships, the Mad Mullah was
unable to get arms and ammunition
by sea as previously. He decided to
, make a desperate attempt to take
I possession of a point on the coast
I with GOO men, who, on October 14.
; attacked the Italian boat and killed
I several men. The following day the
Lombardia bombared the Mullah's po-
! sition and obliged his followers to re
tire.'
PRICE OF DECEMBER WHEAT.
St. Louis Exchange Fixes a Basis or
Settlement.
ST. LOUTS At a special session of
the board of directors of the Mer
chants' exchange the marginal basis
for December wheat was fixed at 87
cents. The meeting was called in an
swer to a petition in which members
of the exchange claimed that owing
to certain manipulations the prices
the board's action. The assertion is
made by the commission men that De-
cember wheat is already practically
I cornered in St. Louis.
Cullcm Calls on President.
WASHIXGTOX Senator CuUom.
chairman of the senate foreign rela
tions committee, had a conference
early on Friday. Engle had risen
early to take a rriin for St. Louis.
While dressing he heard a noise in
the kitchen. He went down and as
he reached the kitchen he was met by
a volley of shots. Two bullet3 en-
tered his head before he fell unecn-
scious.
New Austrian Emigratieit Law.
VDSXXA. The new emigration law
, .---!. .,-. ; - .w
of Austria, wnich is nnw awaiting the
. , .
apprt:val ae msus - &
a03113365 e y"rffJT'g provision under
"hich emigrants of an rlssse? loae
tneir Austrian citizensnip. Tisder'tlie
new law emigrants for economical rem-
sons win continue to be regarded as
Austrian citizens and efforts wm he
made tn keep in touch tsiT isa'ir tmsnt
hi the ccastry tn which, they
WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBERS. 1903.
DEATH IN WRECK
aWOTMTUCKER, SALVA
TIONIST. KILLED.
MSB H IK SMTA FI
a Fatal
Was Returnins
prfien the
KANSAS Cm Mrs. Eama Booth
Tacker, eostsvl im America of the Sal
azkm Arsty, wife of Commander
Booth-Tucker and second daughter of
Wmtaat Booth, founder of the army,
was kfOed im the wreck of the east
boamd CalhTocaia train No. 2 am the
Samtm Fe aear Dean Lake, Mo., eighty
tre stiles east of sTsiisas Ctty, at 10
o'clock Thursday might.
Colonel T. C. Holland, im charge of
the Salvation Armty at Amity, Colo.,
was fatally injured, bat up to 3:30
o'clock in the awning was reported
still alive. Twenty others were mare
or less seriously hart. The dead and
injured were taken to Fort Madison,
Iowa.
Mrs. Booth-Tacker was rendered un
eomscaftns and died within half an
hour after being injured. Her skull
was fractal ed and she was injured in
ternally. She- was on her way from a
visit in Colorado to Chicago, where
she was to hare met her husband. Al
though the wreck occurred at 9:30 at
night, it was mot known until after
midnight that Mrs. Booth-Tucker was
among the injured.
The first details of the wreck were'
obtained by the Associated Press hi
the awraimg over the kng distance tel
ennone from. MareeUme, through Dr.
D. B. Putnam, who had been at the
The wrecked train left Kansas City
Thursday evening. It ran into an
open switch just outside of Dean Lake.
Only the three last cars, two Pull
mans and a diner, were wrecked. The
Pullmans were partly demolished,
while the diner was badly damaged.
In the forward Pullman Mrs.
Booth-Tacker and Colonel HoDnnd.
who were thesole occupants of that
car. fans just gone to the forward end
for a consultation. Two of the Pull
mans struck a steel water tank with
such force as to move- it five feet
from its foundation and when the
train crew reached the scene bath
Mrs. Booth-Tucker and Colonel Hol
land were found unconscious. They,
with the other injured, were after
muck delay taken to the depot plat
form, a few blocks distant, where ev
erything possible was done for them.
Xeither regained consciousness and
within half an hour the noted Salva
tion Army lender succumbed to her in
juries. For a time it was believed
that the unconscious man at her side
was Commander Booth-Tucker and in
the confusion this report was spread.
CHICAGO Commander Booth
Tucker, who arrived in Chicago Thurs
day, expecting to join his wife here,
was prostrated by the shock of Mrs.
Booth-Tucker's death. At the Salva
tion Army headquarters, where he ap
peared soon after his arrival, he de
clined to be interviewed and denied
himself to all but his intimate friends.
Ensign Agnew, speaking for the com
mander, said that he had thus far
made no plans for the immediate fu
ture. RELIEF FOR THE MACEDONIANS.
Red Cross Society to Extend Succor
to the Suffering.
WASHIXGTOX Constantine Step
hanove, special Macedonian delegate
to the United States, who is in this
country in the interest of the oppres
sed people of Macedonia, had a long
talk with Asistant Secretary Loomis.
Mr. Stephanove is anxious to secure
relief for his people, and one purpose
of his visit to this country is to
show their actual and pressing needs.
Mr. Loomis took a lively interest in
the matter, but no direct appeal has
been made for action on the part of
this government.
Later Mr. Stephanove had a confer
ence with Miss Clara Barton. Mrs.
John A. Tngar and other members of
the American Xatioaal Red Cross so
ciety, at which the subject of steps
to be taken for the immediate relief
of the Macedonians was considered,
and it was decided, through the so
ciety to devise means, ff possible, by
which snecor might be extended to
the Macedonians who are suffering.
Will ef Arcftfciahee Katn.
ST. LOUIS The win of the late
Archbishop John J. Earn was filed far
probate. It provides that all of the
late archbishop's property, both of a
personal and real character, snail be
turned over to the diocese. The will
is dated December 14. 1902. Im the
codicil Rer. John A. Connolly. Rev.
John Joseph Hennessey and Bishop
John J. Glenmoa, the Inst named now
arenmsoop at St. Loam, are
Taft May Stay Friar
MAXTLA Munsignor Guidi. the Ro
man jrelate sent to Manila as apos
tolic delegate to conduct negotiations
between the Vatican mad the United
regarding sale of
meld fey the friars, is urgimc set
tlement of the matter before Governor
Taft leaves Jar mertn TheaDTem
or says me mwpea the nsayirfiiusu wffl
mis eepartaie.
hare re-
NAVAL STRENGTH.
MwMsb llwssK Almt VsRFtYCv Vy MswV
WASHINGTON Rear Admiral
Bowses, chief of the bureau of con
struction and repair, in his annual' re
port to the secretary of the navy re
views at length the progress made b
this government in naval construction
during that period. It is shown that
the following additions have been
made to the effective force cf the
navy daring the year:
One battleship, four monitors.
twelve torpedo boat destroyers, one
torpedo boat and seven submarine tor
pedo boats. The list should have
been increased by two battleships and
five cruisers, the report states, but ow
ing to strikes and other causes their
completion was delayed. The report
states that the "rate of progress of
vessels under construction at the pres
ent time presents -some very- encour
aging indications for completions of
many of the most important contracts,
but, considered as a whole, the pro
gress made daring the last fiscal year
has bees very unsatisfactory.
Speaking; of the battleship Ccncec-
acut. wnicn is being buut at a ?ov- i
?rnment yard, and which is a sister
shfcp ef the Louisiana, being built by
a private company, the report says
that although slightly behind the
Louisiana, the progress made has been
well up to the present previous aver
age of contract.
Appended to the report is a complete
list of all the vessels in the navy, with
elaborate data concerning them, alsc
summary which shews there are 252
vessels in the, navy fit fcr service,
forty-five building and twenty-three
onlt for sea service. Vessels fit for
serice, including those under repair,
ire as follows:
First class battleships, ten; second
:lass battleships, one; armored crui
jers' two; armored ram. one; single
turret, harbor defense monitors, four;
double turret monitors, six; protected
cruisers, fourteen; unprotected crui
iers, three; gunboats, twelve; light
iraft gunboats, three; composite gun
'joats, six; training ship (naval acad
lmy), one; special class. Dolphin. Ve
suvius, two; gunboats under 500 tons,
twenty-one; torpedo boat destroyers,
sixteen ; steel torpedo boat3. twenty
oine; submarine torpedo boats efcht;
vooden torpedo boats, one; iron cruis
ng vessels, steam, five; wooden cruis
ing vessels, steam, six; wooden sai!
ng vessels, four; tugs, thirty-nine;
inxiliary cruisers, five; converted
achts, twenty-three; colliers, seven;
lupply ships rnd hospital ships, four
teen. The following are under construc
tion or authorized: rirst class battle
ships, fourteen; armored cruisers.
light; protected cruisers, nine: gun
ooat for Great Lakes (not begun).
:me; composite gunboats, two; steel
torpedo boats, six; training 3hips.
.wo; training brig, one; rags, two.
LAYS DOWN NEW RULE.
Inspectors Must Be Permitted to Ex
amine Stock on Forest Reserves.
WASHIXGTOX. D. C Commis
sioner Richards o2 the general land
3ffice, supplementing tarmer instruc
tions issued by the Indian bureau.
,ias issued crders to forest officers
notifying them that all stock grazed
n the forest reserves must be sub
letted to the bureau of animal in
1u3try when called upon for inspec
tion. That in the event of failure of
owners to recognize inspectors of the
department of agriculture the same
is to be communicated at once to the
interior department, when prompt
and decisive action will be taken. In
event that privilege is being accord
3d owners cf sheep of cattle by the
forest officers and their owners object
to having their stock dipped or treat
ed Commissioner Richards notifies all
such offenders that the permit to
;raze stock will be abrogated immedi
ately. This order supports the hands
of the agricultural department, and is
intended to stamp out. a3 far as pos
sible, diseases incident to 9heo and
cattle grazed on the open plains.
Boy Discovers Sun Spcta,
DENVER, Colo. Herbert S. Howe,
the 15-year-old son of Prof. Herbert
A.- Howe, instructor in astronomy at
Denver university, has discovered at
the upper edge of the sun's disc a
new group of sun 3pots as great in
magnitude and importance, it is stat
ed, as the group discovered by the
scientists of the Washington observ
atory two weeks ago. The bey made
his observations with a six-inch tele
scope in the observatory at University
park in this city.
Harriet A. Richards Dies.
WASHIXGTOX- Mrs. Harriet
Alice Richards, state regent for
Wyoming of the Daughters of the
American Revolution and wife of the
commissioner cf the general land
office, died here Tuesday of heart
trouble. She was 49 years eld and
left three daughters. The burial will
be at Cheyenne. Wyo. She was a
descendant of that branch of the
Hunt family who served as min its
men at Lexington.
River and Harscr Defenses.
WASHIXGTOX. D. C The annuel
report of General George L. Gillespie,
chief of engineers of the United
state army, fcr the year ended Jane
30. 1S03. dealing with fortifications
and river and harbor work, has been
made public At present there are
provided far the defense cf the United
States 105 twelve-inch guns. 133 tan
inch gnsa. 96 eight-inch guns. 567 rap
Si fire guns and 37S twelve-inch mnr-
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Fifty kinds of degrees axe Strom aj
American colleges.
One person in every. 375 im the Uni
ted States is a physician.
The legislative period of a
Reichstag is Sre years in
Brazil's crop of coffee this
equals fifteen-sixteenths of the worid's
consumption.
The inventor of the safety bicycle,
George Shergoid. is dead in an Eng
lish poarhouse.
Already this year America has skijK
ped 0,000 tons of agricultural imple
ments into Russia.
Considerable surprise was "JH-
ed in Paris over the fact that the
of Italy did not applaud when
dent Loubet took him to the opera
there.
The Xatioaal Municipal Improve
ment association selected St Lenin far
the next meeting; next yen- M. 6. M.
Bnrllard. Xewark, X. J., was elected
president.
A new system of wireless tele
graphy, in which the earth is seed for
the transmission of waves invented
by Dario Campana. a young Italian of
Leghorn, was tried succesafnUy.
The outbreak of cholera at Bethle
hem, which was reported October IT.
has been stamped out and Che cordon
of troops which had been drawn
around the city has been removed.
John Howard ParnelL who had been
selected to contest South Meath in ap
position to David Sheehy. is a brother
of the late Charles Stewart Pnrmell
aad city marshal of the city of Dnhv
lin.
Australia has, as the result of last
year's droaoh. bought, sjsce Jamanry.
7,734.000 bushels of wheat, or its
equivalent in flour, from the Pacific
coast, and 1,000,000 bushels from Xew
York.
The Servian government has order
ed a large consignment of Krupp gams
and ammunition, to be delivered on
March 1 next. This Is the first indi
cation of a BaTTrsn outbreak in the
spring.
Mr. Jocfaelson. chief of the Jessup
Xorth Pacific exploring expedition,
states tEat the tribes which he studied
in Siberia possessed characteristias in
common with the Indians of Xorth
America.
The managers of the races at Mem
Dhis. Tenn, have offered the owner of
Cresceus a purse of $5,G0G for the at
tendance of the champion there, on
condition that he go a mile in not less
than 2:00 flat.
General C. A. Whirtierr who was in
charge of the United States- cuatoau
service in Manila, has just returned
to this country by way of the Siberian
railroad, having crossed Siberia in
fourteen da vs.
Official announcement is made in
Xew Orleans that all the vast Hogg
Swayne interests in Louisiana and
lexas. together with those controlled
by General Xelson A. Miles, are to be
combined in one.
There is no truth in the report pub
lished in a special disparca. received
in London from Rome, that the Italian
cabinet has resigned, tiwugh Premier
Zanardelli Is willing to withdraw an ac
count of ill health.
Sir John Cockbum. an eminent Eng
lish authority on matters medical and
surgical, says that women are less
nervous than men in surgical cases,
and are altogether better fitted than
men to become doctors.
The London Exchange Telegraph
company savs Sir Henry Mortimer
Durand. the British ambassador at Ma
drid, will probably succeed the late
Sir Michael Herbert as ambassador of
Great Britain to the United States.
Captain Henry Marmaduke. a son
of former Governor Marmaduke of
Missouri, is now a man without a
country. He gave up his United
States citizenship to take part in a
recent revolution in South America,
which failed, so now he is not a citi
zen of any land. He is in business m
St. Louis.
After years of study devoted to the
topic. Prof. Alfred Xewton of Cam
bridge stated that without doubt bird
migration is the greatest mystery in
the entire animal kingdom "a mys
tery." he added, "that can be no more
explained by the modern man of sci
ence than bv the simple-minded sav
age of antiquity."
General Xelson A. Miles has arriv
ed in Los Angeles after a leisurely
trip through Texas. Xew Mexico and
Arizona. He will remain in Los An
geles several days and will then pro
ceed north by way of San Francisco.
through Oregon and Washiagton.
The "trains de luxe." which now
cover the distance from Moscow to
rhe Pacific 73 sixteen days, and which
rival in luxury any in the United
States, each carry a physician and an
inspector who speaks half a dozen lan
guages. The Third battery cf field artillery
completed its eight hundred mile
march from Chickamauga Park. Tem
to Fort Myer. Every wan who start
ed from Chickamauga was in line as
the battery arrived after its forty-day
march.
Burglars gained an entrance to the
store room of the Deutsch Jewelry
company in Cleveland. O- and secured
diamonds to the value of 5S.000.
In the great coal mines of Bohemia
the average wages. Inside, for nine
hours is SS cents.
Mrs. Ida B. Wise of Missouri Val
ley, corresponding secretary of the
Iowa W. C T. U.. in her annual report
declared that drinking among womes
in the state is on the increase.
Americans imported J23.412.T7i! J
WHOLE 1VUMBER 1.747. .
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