The Columbus journal. (Columbus, Neb.) 1874-1911, January 03, 1883, Image 1

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KATES OP AnvYEMTIgllVC;.
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(lotumbtts
ISSUED EVERY WEDNESDAY, "
M. K. TURNER & CO.,
- Proprietors and Publishers.
10" Business and professional cards
of five lines or less, per annum, five
dollars.
B37 For time advertisements, apply
at this office.
E3Legal advertisements at statue
rates-
ISTFor transient advertising, see
rates on ihird page.
KyAll advertisements payable
monthly.
'OFFICE, Eleventh St., vp itairs
in Journal Building.
terms:
I'eryear .
Six mouths
Three months
Single copies
. 1
VOL. XIII.-N0. 36.
COLUMBUS, NEB., WEDNE&)AY. JANUARY 3, 1883.
WHOLE NO. 660.
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CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION.
C. H. VasjWyck, U. S. Senator, Neb-
raskajCity.
Alvin Saunders, U. S. Senator, Omaha.
E. K. Vilenu.sk, Hep.. West Paint.
T.J. Majors, Contingent Rep., Peru.
STATE DIRECTORY:
Albdhjb Nance, Uorernor, Lincoln.
S. J. Alexander, Secretary of State.
John Wallichs, Auditor, Lincoln.
G. M. Bartlett, Treasurer, Lincoln.
C.J. Dllworlh, Attorney-General.
"W. W. W. Jones, Supt. Public Instruc.
C. J. Kobes, Warden of Penitentiary.
:$? Pri8on "p10"-
J.O. Carter, Prison Physician.
B.P.Mathewson, Supt. Insane Asylum.
JUDICIARY:
AmaLVb'f Associate Judges.
S. Maxwell, Chief Justice,
FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT.
G. W. Post, Judge, York.
M. B. Reese, District Attorney, Wahoo.
LAND OFFICERS:
M. B. iloxie, Register, Grand Island.
Win. Anyan,' Receiver, Grand Island.
LEGISLATIVE:
State Senator, M. K. Turner.
" Representative, G. W. Lehman.
COUNTY DIRECTORY:
J.G. Hijjgins, County Judge.
John Stautfer. County Clerk.
C. A. Newman, C'erk Dist Court.
J. W. Early, Treasurer.
D. C. Kavauaugh, Sheriff.
L.J. Crmer, Surveyor.
M. Mahcr, )
Joseph Rivet, County Commissioners.
H. J. Hudson,
Dr. A. Ileintz, Coroner.
J. E. Moncrief Supt. cf Schools.
WCoSiusj J-ticosofthePeace.
CITY DIRECTORY:
J. R. Meagher, Mayor.
A.B.Coffroth, Clerk.
J. B. Delsman, Treasurer.
W.N. Hensler, Police Judge.
J. E. North, Engineer.
couxcilmex:
1st Ward John Rickly.
G. A. S'jhroeder.
2rf Ward Pat. Havs
I. Gluck.
Sd Ward J. Rasmussen.
A. A. Smith.
CelHaibHH Post OMce.
Open on Sundays tremll a.m. to 12m.
and from 4:30 to 6 r. M. Business
hours except Sunday C a. m. to tf p.m.
Eastern mails close at 11 A. m.
Western mails close at 4:15 p.m.
Mail leaves Columbus for Lost Creek,
Genoa, St. Edwards. Albion, Platte
Center, Humphrey, Madison and Nor
folk, every day (except Sundays) at
4:35p.m. Arrives at 10:55.
For Shell Creek and Crcston, arrives at
12 m. Leaves 1 p. M., Tuesdays, Thurs
days aud Saturdays.
For " Alexis, Patron and David City,
Tuesdays, Thursdays aud Saturdays,
1 p. M Arrives at 12 M.
For Conkling Tuesdays and Saturdays
7 a. m. Arrives 0 1. in. same days .
U P. Time TaWe.
Eastward Bound.
Emigrant., No.G, leaves at ... C:2r a. in.
Passeng'r, " 4, " ".... 10:53 a. m.
Freight, "8, " ".... 2:15 p.m.
Freight, "10, " ".... 4:30 a.m.
Westward Bound.
Freight, No.fi, leaves at.... 2:00 p.m.
Passeng'r, " 3, ".... 4:27p.m.
Freight, " i, " 0:00 p. m.
Emieraut. "7. " ".... 1:30 a.m.
Every day except Saturday the throe
lines leading to Chicago connect with
U P. trains at Omaha. On Saturdays
there will be but one train a day, as
-hown by the following schedule:
B. & M. TIME TABLE.
Leaves Columbus, 5:45 a.m.
" Bellwood 0:30 "
David Citv 7.20 "
" f5 arris on 7:4ft
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Ulysses, H:25
Staplehurst, 8 :""
Seward, 9:30
Ruby 9:50
Milford 10:15
Pleasant Dale, 10:45
rmorilil. 11:10
Arrives at Lincoln, 11:45 M.
Leaves Lincoln at 2:25 p. M. and
rives in Columbus 8:30 p.m.
Makes close connection at Lincoln for
all points east. w-at and south.
O.. N. & B. B. ROAD.
Time Schedule No. 4. To take effect
June 2, '81. For the government and
information of employees only. The
Company reserves the right to vary
therefrom at pleasure. Trains dally,
sunuays exccpivu.
nttrnr,l Hniilld.
Inward Bound.
Norfolk . . .7:26 a. m.
Munsou .7:47 "
Madison ..8:20 "
Humphrey!:05 '
PI. Centre 9:48 '
LostCreeklO.OU "
CoIumbU9l0:55 "
Columbus 4:35 p.m.
LostCreekO:21 "
PL Centre 5:42 "
HumphreyC;25 "
Madison 7:04 "
Munson . 7:43 "
Norfolk . 8:04
ALBION BRANCH.
Columbus. 4:45 p.m.
LostCreek5:31
Genoa 6:16 "
St.Edward7:00 "
Albion 7:47 "
Albion .. 7:43 A.M.
St.Edward8:30 "
Genoa . 9:14 "
LnmCreek9:59 "
Coluinbusl0:4: "
H. IiUERS & CO,
BLACKSMITHS
AND
"Wagon Buildei s,
Xt Brlrk Shop opposite Hrlntx Drug Staff.
ALL MUDS OF WOOD AND IRON WORK ON
WAGONS AMD BUGGIES DONE
OH SHORT H0TICE.
Eleventh Street, Columbus, Nebraska.
50
NEBRASKA HOUSE,
S. J. MAKMOY, Prop'r.
Nebraska Ave., South of Depot,
COLIinBUM, rVEll.
A. new house, newly furnished. Good
accommodations. Board by day or
week at reasonable rates.
.-gC at Flnt-ClKM Xmltle
Heals, 25 Cts. I Lodgings. ...25 Cts.
Of-SlI
COLU9IBi;
Restaurant and Saloon!
E. P. SHEEHAN, Proprietor.
fWholesale nd Retail Dealer in For
eign Wines, Liquors and Cigars, Dub
lin Stout, Scotch and English Ales.
pr Kentucky Whiskies a Specialty.
OTSTBB0 in their season, by the case
can or dish.
11
lUSLYESS CAED8.
A TTORNEYS-AT-LA W,
Up-stalrs in Gluck Building, 11th street,
Above the New bank.
TT J. BCIMOn,
NOTARY PUBLIC.
12th Street, 2 daera west of Haamtad HoaM,
Columbus, Neb. 491-y
pK. M. THUKSTO.t,
RESIDENT DENTIST.
Office over corner of 11th and North-st.
All operations first-class and warranted.
(WlCAtiO BAKBEK SHOP!
HENRY WOODS, Prop'R.
I3TE very thing in first -class style.
Also keen the best of cigars. 010-y
p GER Sc REEDER,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Office on Olive St., Columbus, Nebraska.
2-tf
pt G. A. HULLHORST, A. M., M. D.,
HOMEOPATHIC FHYSICIAN,
garrwo Blocks south of Court House.
Telephone communication. -l7
T TcAI.LISXEK BEOS.,
A TTORNEYS AT LAW,
Office up-stairs in McAllister's build
ing. 11th St. W. A. McAllister, Notary
Public.
J. M. MACFARLAND, B. R. COWDERV,
Mimtj Ml Keury PaWe. CoUtetw.
LAW AND COLLECTION OFFICE
OK
MACFAR&AND& COWDBRT,
Columbia, : : : Nebraska.
p EO. IV. DKKH1,
PAINTER.
BS"CarrIage, house and sign painting,
glazing, paper hanging, kalsomining, etc.
done to order. Shop ou 13th St., opposite
Engine nouse, Columbus, Neb. 10-y
Tf H.JR1J8CHE,
llth St., nearly opp. Gluck's store,
Sells Harness, Saddles, Collars, Whips,
Blankets, Curry Combs, Brushes, etc.,
at tbe-'lowest possible prices. Repairs
promptly attended to.
G
W. CLARK,
LAND AND INSVBANCE AGENT,
HUMPHREY, NEBR.
His lands comprise some fine tracts
in the Shell Creek Valley, and the north
ern portion of rirtte county. Taxes
paid for non-residents. Satisfaction
guaranteed. 20 y
BYRON MILLKTT,
Justiceof the Peace and
Notary Public.
BVROK M1L.L.ETTV
ATTORNEY' AT LAW, Columbus
Nebraska. N. B. He will give
close attention to all business entrusted
to him. 248.
T OOIS SCHRE1BER,
BLACKSMITH AND WAGON MAKER.
All kinds of repairing done on short
notice. Buggies, Wagons, etc., made to
order, aud all work guaranteed.
BTShop opposite the " Tattersall,"
Olive Street. "25
XTTTACJUEK St WESTCOTT,
AT THK
CHECKERED BARN,
Are prepared to furnish the public w!th
good teams, buggies aud carriages for all
occasions, especially for funerals. Also
conduct a feed and sale stable. 49
TAMES PEARSALL
IS PRKPARKD, WITH
FIRST -CLASS APPARATUS,
To remove houses at reasonable
rates. Give nimta call.
-VTOTICf? TO TEACHERS.
J. B. Moncrief, Co. Supt.,
Will be in bis office at the Court House
on the first Saturday or each
month for the purpose of examining
applicants for teacher's certificates, and
for the trausactton of any other business
pertaining to schools. J567-y
nOLUMBIS PACknG CO.,
COLUMBUS, - NEB.,
Packers and Dealers in all kinds of Hog
product, cash paid for Live or Dead Hog
or grease.
Directors. R. H Henry, Prest.; John
Wiggius, Sec. and Treas.; L. Qerrard, S.
Corv.
TAMES SALMON
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Plans and estimates supplied for either
frame or brick buildings. Good work
guaranteed. Shop on 13th Street, near
St. Paul Lumber Yard, Columbus, Ne
braska. 02 Cmo.
D. T. Martyn, M. D. F. Schug, 31. D.,
Deutscher Arts.)
Drs. XABTYH ft SCHUG,
U. S. Examining Surgeons,
Local Surgeons, Union Pacific and
O., N. & B. II. R. R's.
COLUMBUS, - NEBRASKA.
32-vol-xiii-y
WILLIAM RYAN,
DEALER IN
KENTUCKY WHISKIES
Wines, Ales, Cigars and Tobacco.
gSfSchilz's Milwaukee Beer constant
ly on hand.fRl
Elfvknth St. Columbus. Neb.
JS. MURDOCK Jb SON,
Carpenters snd Contractors.
Havenad an extended experience, and
will guarantee satisfaction in work.
All kinds of repairing done on short
notice. Our motto is, Good work aud
fair prices. Call and give nsan oppor
tuuity to estimate for you. J5TShop on
13th St., one door west of Friedhof &
Co's. store. Columbus. Nebr. 483-v
THE
COLUMBUS FLAX AND TOW CO.,
Are prepared to receive and pay S3.00 per
ton for good clean flax straw (free from
foreign substances) delivered on their
grounds near the Creamery, in Cofum
bus Nebraska.
COLUMBDS FLAX TOW CO.,
GEO. SMITH, Aft.
Columbus, Dec. 5, 1882. &-2a
ADVIETISEMMTTS.
R1T
National Bank!
COX.XJBCBXJB.
Antiorixed Capital,
Cmr Capital,
- $250,000
50,000
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
A. ANDERSON, Pres't.
SAM'L C. SMITH. Vice Preset.
O. T. ROEN, Cashier.
J. W. EARLY'
ROBERT TJHLIG,
HERMAN OEHLRICH,
W. A. MCALLISTER,
G. ANDERSON,
P. ANDERSON.
Foreign and Inland Exchange, Passage
Tickets, Real Estate, Loan ana insurance.
S9.voM3.ly
BECKER & WELCH,
PROPRIETORS OF
SHELL CREEK HILLS.
MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLE
SALE DEALERS IN
FLOUR AND MEAL.
OFFICE, COLUMBUS, NEB.
SPEICE & NORTH,
General Agents for the Sale of
REAL ESTATE.
Union Pacific, and Midland Pacific
R. R. Lands for sale at from $3.00 to $10.00
per acre for cash, or on five or ten years
time, in annual payments to suit pur
chasers. We have also a large and
choice lot of other lands, improved and
uniinp.-oved, for sale at low price and
on reasonable terms. Also busines and
residence lots in the city. We keep a
complete abstract of title to all real es
tate in Platte County.
621
COE.fJ9IltIJB, NEB.
PfllMY'S -REST 1
BUY THE
Patent Roller Process
MINNESOTA
FLOUR!
ALWAYS GIVES SATISFACTION,
Because it makes a superior article of
bread, and is the cheapest flour
in the market.
Every sack warranted to ntn alike, or
money refunded.
HERMAN OEHLRICH & BRO.,
GROCERS.
l-3ra
LANDS, FARMS,
AND
CnTPBOPMMuALE,
AT THE
Union Pacfic Land Office,
On Long Time and low rate
of Interest.
All wishing to buy Rail Road Lands
or Improved Farms will find it to their
advantage to call at the U. P. Land
Office before lookin' elsewhere as I
make a specialty of bnying and selling
lands on commission; all persons wish
ing to sell farms or unimproved land
will find it to their advantage to leave
their lands with me for sale, as my fa
cilities for affecting sales are unsur
passed. I am prepared to make fiua!
proof for all parties wisbiug to get a
patent for their homesteads.
i2T"Henry Cordes, Clerk, writes and
speaks German.
SAMUEL C. SMITH,
Agt. U. P. Land Department,
021-y COLUMBUS, NEB
WM. BECKER,
DEALKK IX ALL KINDS OF
FAMILY GROCERIES!
I KEEP CONSTANTLY ON HAND A
WELL SELECTED STOCK.
Teas, Coffees, Sugar, Syrups,
Dried and Canned Fruits,
and other Staples a
Specialty.
(Seeds DcllTcrcd Free te stay
part r the City.
I AM ALSO AGENT FOR THE CEL
EBRATED COQUHXARD
Farm and Spring Wagons,
of which I keep a constant supply on
hand, but few their equal, in style and
quality, second to none.
CALL AMD IXAKX PRICES.
Cov. Thirteenth and K Streets, near
A.tN.lKpoU
POETRY AND THE POET.
(ffWMd th PtKsdak.)
Weary, I opoa wide tke antique
l ope te tae air
Iopete
I open to t air the antique pane
tberoad? 1
J- tke Uttft-aowBteld et
acroM )
commonplace?
A-ahlaxmeriaa- amen Im brseaes botm ef meat;
Aadlo!
Andkifh
( ' 1
And mj soul's ejeebeaoid VbUlewymala
(
Whose furtfeer ataore is Greece atnla
again
vain
roadie mythological alluaioa. Mem: Leaa
priere. I see thee, Atalanta, reetal fleet.
And look 1 with doves low-flutterlne; roumd
her feet,
( field of o
Cornea Tenus through the g-oldea V g
I bowiaf ) fi
(Mtariby the Pott's nttcihbor.)
Venus be bothered Ife Virginia Dlxi
(Jfomd en (ft Pott's door.)
I Out on Important business back at 6,
reported by
H. C. Banner, in The Century.
m
A GOOD SWORD-STROKE;
Or, How Colonel De Malet Diet Hie
IHatcb.
There was a high frolic going on in a
small town in southern France one line
summer morning toward the end of the
last century. The great local fair, which
only came ouce iu six months, was in
full swing, and the queer little market-
Jtlace of the town, with its old-fashioned
ountain in the middle, aud its tall, dark
houses all round, was crowded to over
flowing. Here was a juggler eating fire,
or pulling ribboua out of his mouth by
the yard, amid a ring of wondering peas
ants. There an acrobat was turning
head over heels, and walking on his
hands with his feet up in the air. A lit
tle farther on a show of dancing dogs
had gathered a large crowd; and close
by a sly-looking fellow in a striped irock,
leaning oyer the front of a wagon, was
-recommending a certain cure for tooth
. ache, which, however, judging from the
wry faces of those who ventured to try
it, must have been almost as bad as the
cemplaint itself.
The chief attraction of the fair, how
ever, seemed to be a tall, gaunt man,
with an unmistakably Italian face, who
was standing on a low platform beside
the fountain. He had been exhibiting
some wonderful feats of swordsmanship,
such as throwing an apple into the air
and cutting it in two as it fell, tossing
up his sword and catching it by the hilt,
striking an egg with it so lightly as not
ven to break the shell, and otheraequal
ly marvelous. At length, having collect
ed a great throng around him, he stepped
forward, and challenged any one present
to try a sword bout with him, on the
condition that whichever was first dis
armed should forfeit to the other half a
livre(teu cents),
Several troopers who were swaggering
about the market-place, for there was a
cavalry regiment quartered in the town,
came up one after another to try their
hand upon him. But to the great de
light of the crowd they all got the wont
ont; and one might have guessed from
the eagerness with which the poor Ital
ian gnached up the- money, as well as
from his pale face and hollow checks,
that he did not often earn so much in
one day.
Suddenly the crowd parted from right
to left as a handsome young man in a
fine gold-laced coat and plumed hat, with
a silver-'hilted sword by his side, forced
his way through the press, and confront
ed the successful swordsman.
"You handle your blade so well, my
friend," cried he, "that I should like to
try a bout with you myself, for I'm
thought to be something of a swords
man. But before we begin, take these
two livres and get yourself some food at
the French Lily yonder, for you look so
tired and huntrry, and it's no fair match
between a fasting man and a full one."
a-wt, .uuj ucaicu viizam vuu, my
lord, whoever you may be!" said the
man, fervently; "for you're the first who
has given me a kindly word this many a
day. I can hardly expect to be a match
for you, but if you will be pleased to
wait but ten minutes, I'll gladly do my
best"
The fencer was as good as his word,
and the moment he was seen to remoi-jt
the platform the lookers-on crowded
eagerly around it, expecting a well
fought bout; for they had all seen what
he could do, and they now recognized
his new opponent as the Marquis de
Malet, who had the name of being the
best swordsman in the whole district
Their expectations were not disappointed.-
For the first minute or so the
watching eyes around could hardly fol
low the swords, which flickered to and
fro like flashes of lightning, feinting,
warding, striking, parrying till they
seemed to be everywhere at once. De
Malet at first pressed his man vigorously
but finding him more skillful than he
had expected, he began to fight more
cautiously, and to aim at tiring him
out.
This artful plan seemed likely to suc
ceed, for the Italian at length lowered
his weapon for a moment, as if his hand
was growing wearied. But as De Malet
made a rapid stroke at him, the other
suddenly changed the sicord from his
right hand to his left, and catching the
Marquis' blade in reverse, seut it flying
among the crowd below.
"Well done!" cried the youug man
admiringly. "I thought I knew most
tricks offence, but I never saw one like
that before "
" I could teach it to your lordship in a
week," said the Italian. " For a man of
your skill nothing is needed but prac
tice." "Say you so?" cried De Malet "Then
the sooner we begin, the better. Come
home with me, and stay till you've
taught me all you know. One doesn't
meet a man like you every day."
And so for a month to come Antonio
Spalatro was the guest of Henri de Malet;
and the young Marquis learned to per
form the ieat which had excited his
wonder quite as dexterously as the Ital
ian himself.
White lay the snow upon the fields
outside the Marine city of Moscow. The
Russians had fired their own capital.
The veteran bands of Napoleon were flee
ing from fire to perish amid ice and
snow.
"Down with the French dog!"
"Cut him to pieces!"
"Send a bullet through him!"
A dozen arms were raised at once
against the solitary man, who, with his
back against a wall, and one foot on the
body of his horse, sternly confronted
them. Henri de Malet (now Colonel De
Malet, of the French Cuirassiers) was
still the same dashing fellow as ever,
though twenty-three yeais had passed
uce he took his first lesson in fencing
frost Spalatro, the Italian, of whom he
kad ever heard a word all this while.
But if Spalatro was gone, his teaching
was not, and De Malet's sword seemed to
be everywhere at once, keeping the
swarming Russians at bay, as it had done
many a time already during the terrible
retreat which was now approaching its
end.
"Leave him to me," cried a deep voice
from behind; "he's a man worth fight
ing, this fellow!"
"Ay, leave him to the Colonel," cho
russed the Russians. "He'll soon settle
his fine fencing tricks."
A tall-dark man, 'whose close-cropped
black hair was just beginning to trn
gray, stepped forward, and crossed
swords with De Malet, who, feeling at
once that he had met his match, stood
warily on the defensive. The Russian
grenadiers watched eagerly as the swords
flashed and fell and rose again, while
the combatants, breathing hard and set
ting their teeth, struck, parried, ad
vanced and retreated by turns. At
length De Malet, finding himself hard
pressedried the blow taught him by
Spalatro:, but the stranger met him with
a whirling back stroke that whisked the
sword cleau out of his hand. Instead of
cutting him down, however, the Rus
sian seized him by the hand with a cry
of joy.
" There's but one man in the French
army who knows that stroke," cried he,
"and I am glad to see you remember so
well what I taught you. Now at last
Spalatro the officer can repay the kind
ness shown to Spalatro the vagabond.
When I came over here with the Rus
sian Prince to whom you so kindly rec
ommended me, they soon found out thr.t
I could handle soldiers as well as swords,
and gave me a commission in the army,
and here I am, Colonel Spalatro, with
the Cross of St. George, and a big estate
in Central Russia. Now if you fall into
the hands of our soldiers you'll be killed
toa certahiity, so you'd better come
with me to headquarters, where I'll re
port you as my prisoner. You will be
safe under my charge until there's a
chance ofsendiug you home, and then
you are welcome to go as soon as you
please."
And Cokmel Spalatro was as good as
his word. -HarjKr's Young People.
Earthworks aud Irou-Clads.
The bombardment of Alexandria has
furnished, and will contiuue to furnish,
fruitful discussion for a long time on
scientific and technical subjects. The
long attack on Sebustapol, the numerous
bombardments of the Malakofi and the
Redan without any decisive efFect,brought
vividly before men's minds the value of
earthworks, especially when the defenses
are likely to be attacked by heavy guns.
The artillery of the defenders was sileuced
over and over again, and the works be
came mere heaps of rubbish; but the-
Mleuce ot the pieces only meant that
they were placed out of fire for the time,
and the rubbish heaps bristled again
with guns in a day or two, sometimes in
one night After rifled guns were intro
duced the same fact was observed, and
became even more prominent, because
the elongaU-d shells had a far greater ef
fect on masonry than the round projec
tiles of the old smooth-bore. The rilled
guns of the Federals were very bad in
tlieT American civil war, but they were
enough for masonry defenses; and in the
Danish campaign of 1864, aud in the
great wars which followed, we find hard
ly anything done by guns against earth
works. The Italian fleet bombarded the
defenses of the Island of Lissa before the
sea fight of that name, and were driven
on" by the forts; but again in this case
the few rifled guns possessed by the ships
were of what would now be considered
very inferior quality, and the batteries
were on heights. Even in experimental
practice at Shoeburyness and elsewhere,
every target of masonry, oi even iron,
that coula be erected was quickly dis
posed of by the guns, yet no one ever
thought of destroying the butt which is
used at Woolwich for the proof of guns.
In fact, all artillery firing, greator small,
experimental or in actual war, has told
the same tale the inferiority of mason
ry to earthworks as a means of defense.
The masonry forts of Paris were
breached and set on fire by the German
guns, while the earthen German batteries
suffered or escaped just in proportion as
they were built with ordinary well-shaped
parapets, oi consisted of guns sunk in the
slopes of mounds of earth. The works ol
Plevna were fortified hill tops and sides,
only earth and wood were employed in
their formation; yet they resisted the fire
of many guns for a long time, and re
mained serviceable to the last There is
nothing really new in the information
telegraphed to us by our correspondent
that the earthworks of Alexandria re
sisted better than the masonry; but one
more argument is added to the many
which already exist on the subject It
may be that there must be some masonry
in the works of the great fortresses; but
it is now plainer than ever that it should
be got rid of as much as possible, and so
arranged that in time of war it can be
protected with earth.
Is an iron-clad fleet likely to have the,
best of it in an engagement with works
on the shore, or is it not? On this point
we can only say that nothing that hag
occurred at Alexandria has given the
occasion to alter the opinion which most
scientific officers have formed. Of course,
you may have iron-clads so weak and
forts so strong (or the reverse) as to give
no opportunity for fair comparison, and
thin, to some extent, is what occurred at
Alexandria. The Egyptian gunners
were possessed of some excellent rifled
guns, but they knew not how to make
the best useroi them; they had not, for
instance, any of the modern means for
ascertaining with certainty, moment
by moment, the exact distance of a mov
ing object, and without such knowledge
all fire must be wild. For one reason or
another, it is certain that their fire was
comparatively weak and inaccurate.
The ships were struck chiefly by smooth
bore guns only, and these have little ef
fect upon modern iron-clads. If, on the
contrary, the Egyptians had possessed
some of the hundred-ton guns which are
to be mounted at Malta and Gibraltar,
and had r.lso possessed gunners skilled
enough to work them with effect, each
single projectile could have crashed
through the thickest armor of any of our
iron-clads, and we must have heard of
sunken ships. The only fair conclusion
to be drawn from the bombardment is
that, supposing that ships and forts pos
sessed of equally powerful armaments,
equally well-trained gunners, and gener
ally with scientific means equally abreast
of the knowledge of the day, the ships
must get the worst of the encounter.
The practice of their guns cannot be as
good, and the fort can continue firing bo
long as it has one piece of ordnance re
maining mounted; while ships equally
battered must have sunk long before.
This has long been the opinion of the
best-informed military men, and we be
lieve that the bombardment of Alexan
dria has done nothing to change it
London Standard.
The Boston Post knows of twelve
Senators who have Presidential aspira
tions. , That's nothing. Any citizen cav
have that complaint. Detroit Free Press.
Lawful and Unlawful Warfare.
It is curious to notice distinctions ia
naval warfare between lawful and un
lawful methods, similar to those con
spicuous on land. Such projectiles as
bits of iron-ore, pointed stones, nails or
glass, are excluded from the list of things
that may be used in good war, and the
declaration of St. Petersburg condemns
explosive bullets as much on one element
as on the other. Unfounded charges of
one belligerent against another are, how
ever, always liable to bring the illicit
method into actual use on both sides
under the pretext of reprisals, as we see
in the following order of the day, issued
at Brest by the French Vice Admiral,
Marshal Conflans, (Nov. 8,1759:) "It
is absolutely contrary to the law of na
tions to make bad war, and to shoot
shells at the enemy, who must always be
fought according to the rules of honor,
with the arms generally employed by po
lite nations. Yet some captains have
complained that the English have used
such weapons against them. It is, there
fore, only on these complaints, and with
an extreme reluctance, that it has been
resolved to embark hollow shells on ves
sels of the line, but it is expressly for
bidden to use them unless the enemy be
gin." So the English in their turn
charged the French with making bad
war. The wound received by Nelson at
Aboukir, on the forehead, was attributed
to a piece of iron or a langridge shot
And the wounds that the crew of the
Brunswick received from the Vengeur
in the famous battle between the French
and English fleets in June, 1794, are
said to have been peculiarly distressing,
owing to the French employing langridge
shot of raw ore and old nails, and to
throwing stinkpots into the portholes,
which caused most painful burnings and
scaldings. It is safest to discredit such
accusations altogether, for there is no
limit to the barbarities that may come
into play in consequence of too ready a
credulity. Red-hot shot, legitimate for
the defense of laud forts against ships,
used not to be considered good war in
the contests of ships with one another.
In the three hours' action between the
Lively and the Tourterelle, a French
privateer, the use by the latter of hot
shot, "not usually deemed honorable
warfare," was considered to be wrong.but
a wrongonthepartof those who equipped
her for sea more than on the part of the
captain who fired them. The English
assailing batteries that fired red-hot shot
against Gluckstadt, in 1813, are said to
have resorted to a "mode of warfare very
unusual with us since the siesre of Gib
raltar." The "Treatise on Tactics," by
the Emperor Leo VI., carries back the
record of the means employed against an
enemy in naval warfare to the ninth
century. The things he recommends as
most effective are: Cranes, to let fall
heavy weights on the enemy's decks;
caltrops, with iron spikes to wound his
feet; jars full of quicklime, to suffocate
him; jars containing combustibles, to
burn; jars containing poisonous reptiles,
to bite him, and Greek fire, with its
noise like thunder, to frighten as well as
burn him. Many of the methods were
of immemorial usage, for Scipio knew
the merits of jars full of pitch, and Han
nibal of jars full of vipers. Nothing was
too bad for use in those days, nor can it
be ascertained when or why they ceased
to be ued. Greek fire was ueod with
reat effect in the sea battles between the
aracens and Christians, but it is a fair
cause of wonder that the invention of
gunpowder should have so entirely su
perseded it as to cause its very manufac
ture to have been forgotten. Neither
does history record the date of, nor the
reason for, the disuse of quicklime,
which, in the famous fight off" Dover in
1217, between the French and English,
contributed so greatly to the victory of
the latter. Gentleman1 s Maqazine.
French Madhouses and Their Victims.
The sensation of the hour in Paris is the
case of Jean Mistral, who has been forty
two years in the private lunatic asylum
of St. Remy, in Provence. He was, it is
now admitted all round, of sound mind
when his father, on a doctor's certificate
and in virtue of the law of 1838, locked
hin: up there. His reason for incarcer
ating his son was to prevent his remarry
ing a Polish lady whom, in good faith he
had married abroad. The marriage cer
emony, on the petitien of the elder Mis
tral, had been set aside by a French tri
bunal because there had been insufficient
publication, and other formalities pre
scribed by the code had not been ob
served. Old Mistral was a very wealthy
manufacturer of jet and beads. He
wanted his only son to heap fortune upon
fortune in marrying the heiress of a Mar
seilles shipowner. The Polish lady was
very beautiful, of honorable life, but
poor, and she had been obliged to turn
an enthralling voice to mercantile ac
count by singing in theatres and at con
certs. Jean Mistral was taking steps to
marry her according to French law,when
his father one day ran against him in the
high street of Tarascon in the year 1840,
and cried out to a couple of policemen
who were with him to arrest the madman.
The son made a desperate fight for his
liberty, and soldiers were called In. He
was subjugated, and sent off manacled
to an asylum near Montpellier, where he
still is. The fact that he resisted la force
publique was taken as confirmation of the
doctor's lettre de cachet or certificate, and
he was treated for raging lunacy. Old
Mistral died soon after. The fortune
that he made in glass trinkets went
equally to the captive at Montpellier and
to his sister Mme. Barnard. As it was a
great one, the Bamards kept the alleged
madman in durance. His wife (thfl
Polish woman, who in law was no wife)
died when he had been a score of yeaii
locked up. Her daughter, after an in
terval of six monthe, followed her to the
grave. Old Mistral had caused the
former to be expelled from France on
the ground that she was a bad character,
was disturbing the peace of a resittctab'e
and rich family, and had no visible means
of existence. Technically she was a
vagabond, as she was reduced to go from
one small town to another to sing in
cafes. Soon after she was turned out of
France she gave birth to a daughter in
Switzerland. Mother and child died in
extreme poverty some years later.
The news of their death threw the
firisoner in the asylum into a state of
renzy. The fortune inherited by Jean
Mistral from his father has gone on ac
cumulating at a simple and compound
interest, and has been very carefully
nursed by the Barnards, who are his
heirs apparent M. Foumier, who has
been exerting himself to get the lunatic
released from the asylum, is his first
cousin. According to an article in the
Civil Code, a rich madman or madwoman
is not to be confined in a madhouse, but
placed under treatment at home, and is
to be provided with a domestic establish
ment corresponding with his or her year
ly revenue. Mistral is an ordinary
boarder atithe asylum, where he has passed
nearly half a century, and is allowed one
man-servant, whose business is not to
minister to his comfort, but to prevent
him escaping. Pall Mall GuzeiU.
OF GENERAL INTEREST.
The wealthiest city in the United
States, in proportion to population, is
Portland, Ore.
According to the Louisville Cottrier
Journal' Saratoga Springs correspondent,
Vanderbilt's income is$l,290,000 a month,
or $43,000 a day.
A man near Newnan. Ga., has been
working an alleged gold mine forty years,
and has never made a cent He is still
confident that there's "millions in it"
An English Judge has characterized
the disagreement of a jury which stood
eleven to one after eight hours' confine
ment, as lamentable and sad.
The Boston papers proudly record the
fact that an umbrella was left at the
lady's package-room of the Old Colony
station in that citv for six weeks, with
out being checked', but was returned to
the owner when called for.
George Holyoake, the English phi
lanthropist, has arrived in New York, his
object being to try to induce our Gov
ernment to issue a trustworthy guide
book for immigrants, giving facts in re
gard to the resources of each State.
Chicago Tribune.
A real estate dealer advertises in a
Dakota newspaper: " I can be found at
the Gold Mine playing ' freeze out,' at
Mitchell's Exchange betting on the age
of 'old bosses' with Brown, or at my
residence on Oak street, perusing the
Scriptures." N. Y. Sun.
According to the official estimates
for 1881, just published, the population
of Scotland it3,744,G85 of whom 1,802,
901 are males and 1,941,784 females.
About 32 per cent of the 3,744,000 live
in the eight principal towns. The total
number of births was 12o,214, last year.
A Polish woman, who recently ar
rived in Pittsburgh from London, has
had her husband arrested there for deser
tion. She had tracked him to St. Peters
burg, London, Paris, back to London, to
New York, and then to Pittsburgh, where
she discovered him at work. Chicago
Times.
A Kansas City paper estimates the
corn crop of KaiiNis and Missouri at 440,
000,000 bushels. Just think for a mo
ment of the luiakiug bees out there, and
the number of red ears that must cer
tainly exist in that pile. The girls of
Kan.s.u and Missouri are sure to have a
gK)d time this winter. Chicago Inter
Ocean. Fifteen lives are lost on the British
coasts each week on an average; and thus
in twentv-six vears about 20.000 Iiv
perished, chiefly in the occupation of
fishing. These losses ha vegenemlly been re
garded as inevitable, but a society has been
formed for providing places of refuge ou
the coast for fisherman and other mari
ners. Convict labor is to be used in the
construction of the.se harbors.
A recent decision of the Treasury
has stopjed Canadian tugs from towing
United States vessels between United
States ports. They may tow from a
Canadian to a United States port, but
may not contiuue from that to another
United States port A Kingston paper
is torn up by it, and says that similar
privileges on the other side have been
used by United States tugmen, which
will now be cut off. Chicago Journal.
The oporatoi at the Mobile office of
the Mobile and Gulf Telegraph Com
pany was recently surprised by hearing
over his wire through messages from
New Orleans and New York. An inves
tigation showed that an unfortunate frog
had found its way into a cable-box, and
its body burned almost to a crisp, formed
asuliicient connection between the West
ern Union and the Mobile and Gulf wires.
The centennial anniversary of Mrs.
Joseph Harris, at Wheeler End, England,
was the occasion of a jubilee in which
the whole village Joined. A triumphal
arch was erected, under which the old
lady rode in an open carriage drawn by
over 200 men and women, all of whom
were her lineal descendants. She has
been the mother of sixteen children. The
eldest now living is eighty-one years old,
and the youngest fifty.
It is related as a remarkable circum
stance connected with the unfortunate
Miss Blair, who committed suicide at
Camden, S. C, that only a few days be
fore her death she had been sketching
points of interest around her home, hav
ing acquired considerable skill in that
line, and one of the sketches was a faith
ful delineation of the gully, in which she
was afterward found, with the dead body
of a young girl lying in it This fur
nishes a strong presumption that the act
of self-destruction was premeditated by
her for some time before its consumma
tion. Chicago Times.
The Alexandria correspondent of
the London Standard relates a humorous
story. A gentleman wrote to the Ad
miral complaining that there was a shell
belonging to the inflexible in his draw
ing room, and requesting its removal.
The, Admiral passed the letter to the
captain of the Inflexible, and he sent on
shore a boatswain and half a dozen sea
men, who found the great shell lying un
exploded in the drawing room as de
scribed. As it would have been dan
gerous to bump it about, a device was,
after some . consideration, hit upon for
conveying' it to the' shore. A feather
bed was procured, and the shell was
firmly enveloped in it. It was then care
fully rolled down stairs, and so back to
the ship- - ' "
"
The Mouse and the Lien.
A lion who had lived for several years
in a certain neighborhood and gained
general respect for the manner in which
he had conducted himself, was suddenly
made the object of slanders and abuse.
When he came to trace these stories back
he found that they had been started by a
mouse.
"Why have you slandered me?" de
manded! the lion.
"Because the people will only accept
me as a mouse," was the reply.
"But am I to blame for that?"
"Perhaps not, but why should you be
a lion, able to strike down the ox, while
I am but a puny mouse, able only to
frighten women and children? What
grieres me is the fact that nature made
a mistake."
"Very well, said the king of beasts;
"you go forth and roar and kill, and I
will become a mouse."
The mouse stalked into the forest and
began to growl and roar, but his efforts
were received with laughter. After he
had tried it again and again the owl
droned down beside him and observed:
"Instead of making me afraid, you.
only disturb my slumbers and annoy my
friends. Come inside, out of the ma
laria." MORAL.
The mouse who nibbles at crumbs is
doing all that is expected of him.
Secondly He who looks for the mis
takes of others shows the world his en
vious feelings. Detroit Free Press.
Ninety-three thousand acres of trees.
it is said, have been planted in Kansas !
-At ? .1 t
wiuiin uiree yean.
PERSONAL AND IMPESONAX.
Henry Villard, President of the
North Pacific Railway, has given the
employes a library of 2,000 volumes.
Chicago Inter-Ocean.
Miss Ida Lewis, now forty veare of
age, still keeps the Lime Rock light-
nouse, .Newport, which has been under
her charge for twenty years.
Blondin, the rope-walking hero of
Niagara, in spite of his fifty-eight years,
has again made his appearance on the
tight-rope in the "Neue Welt" at Berlin,,
greatly to the delight of the Berliners.
Madame do Rcmusat, granddaughter
of General Lafayette, and widow of the
academician and statesman who was
Thier's friend and Minister of Foreign
Allaire, recently died at the age otseven-ty-five.
J. C. Whitin, in Whitinville, Mass.,
bequeathed 820,000 to home and $25,000
to foreign missions, $5,000 to the Church
Erection Society of New York, and $5,
000 to the University of New Mexico.
His will was unsigned, but the family
carried out his wishes. Boston Poit.
"Aunt" Jennie Roots, a negress, who
has reached the advanced age of 120
years or more, died at Col. William
Duke's residence, Boyle county, Ken
tucky, recently. She related many in
cidents of the revolutionary period, and
says that when she came to Kentucky
the country was "full of Indians." Chi
cago Times.
J. H. Lester, who lives near Mc
Donough, Ga., is 113 years old, having
been born in Rockingham, N. C, Decem
ber 7, 1769. Ho distinctly remembers the
Revolutionary War, and when eleven
years old he was detailed with other boy
to defend the women and children from
the Tories. He served under General
Floyd during the war of 1812. Mr. Les
ter is old enough to vote.
Mr. Gray,lately condemned in Dub
lin for contempt of court, personally is a
genial host, a pleasant talker and always
in command of himself. He lives in
what is probably the most luxurious
home in Dublin. He attends closely to
his paper, and by means of a telephone
between house and office is houny in
communication with his editors. Mrs.
Gray is popular in society, and her enter
tainments are the most agreeable and
brilliant given in Dublin. Detroit Post.
Ex-Senator David R. Atchison, who,
as President of the United States Senate,
was under strict construction of the con
stitution, Acting President of the United
States for thirty-six hours between tho
close of President Polk's Administration
and the inauguration of General Taylor,
recently completed his seventy-fifth year
at his home in Clinton County, Mo. He
is six feet two inches tall, straight as an
arrow, despite his age, and tiiw the scale
at 200 pounds. He declares his eyesight,
appetite and general health to be excel
lent, but is gradually loosing his memory.
Chicago Journal.
"A LITTLE NONSENSE. n
Michigan has had only twenty-one
fatal cases of lockjaw resulting from the
toy pistol, but the thrashing machine has
begun to encourage statisticians. De
troit Free Press.
The Bridgeport (Me.) News calmly
says: llie types last weet made us say
that the showers were not sufficient
meet the wants of milkmen,' etc., in
stead of millmcn."
A hotel was burned down in New
York not long ago, and a Texas editor
lost all his baggage. That was tho
reason the papers said the loss was not
as large as was at first supposed. Texas
Siftings.
A new edition of Webster's Diction
ary has just been issued. It has a velvet
cushion on one cover, thus greatly in
creasing its convenience and comfort for
the baby whose ch:ir is reinforced with
it at the table. Boston Post.
Scene, a butcher's staud. Butcher:
"Come, John, be lively now; break the
bones in Mr. Williams's chops, and put
Mr. Smith's ribs in the basket for him."
John (briskly) : "All right, sir; just as
soon as I've sawed off Mrs. Murphy's
leg."
A Vermonter has invented a water
telescope with which he claims he can
see a five cent piece in forty feet of
water. But the blasted telescope doesn't
bring the coin up, so seeing it is only an
aggravation, and we don't want any
such instrument Boston Post.
A writer in a magazine tells how to
utilize old tin cans. They are to be
decorated, of course; and from the direc
tions given we infer that an old tomato
can, with several hours' labor, and at the
trifling expense of a couple of dollars,
can be converted Into an ornament worth
at least fifteen cents. Norristoum Her
ald. Said the practical man: "You can
talk all you want- to about phrenology.
I think it is all stuff, The only impor
tant bump I ever found on mv cranium
was here right in the middle of my
forehead and it was made by a base ball
bat I concluded to call it the bump of
ignorance because I didn't know
enough to get out of the way."-Lowell Cit
izcn. t
Aw o.-nT.nnA . U T r V
--iiu cjtuiaugc kjb mat roicBNUr
Schiff, the Florentine vivisector, has
used up more than 14,000 dogs in his ex
periments. If Professor Schiff will just
bring his working tools and vivisecting
room to America, he will receive a wel
come warmer and more cordial a thous
and fold than has been extended to Os
car Wilson or Tug Wilde or Jumbo, or all
three combined. Burlington Hawkeye.
Thafsall infernal nonsense!" replied
the old man from Connecticut, as the
other asked him if wooden nutmegs were
ever really sold in that State. "I've
lived there risin of seventy-five years
and I never saw such a thing in my
life." "But there are stories to that ef
fect" "I don't keer for no stories. All
there is to the hull bizness is the fact
that some of our folks were so hurried
for time that they couldn't wait for hams
togrow, and made 'em out o' wood."
"They did, eh!" "I acknowledge they
did, but theLord never laid it up agin
old Connecticut never, All them 'ere
hams went to the heathen in Boston 1"
Wall Street News.
The problem of life has been solved
by an Italian who keeps an eating house
in New York. His bill of fare is gov
erned by the following regulations: Cof
fee or tea, per cup, one cent; soup, per
bowl, one cent; pie, per cut, two cents;
beefsteak, four cents; roast meats, four
cents; chicken stew, five cents; ham and
eggs, eight cents, etc Many a hungry
stomach desires to know "Where's his
place?" N. Y. Graphic
A simple way to catch mosquitoes:
Nail a small tin box cover on the end of
a broomstick, fill the bottom of the box
cover with kerosene oil, and where you
see a mosquito on the ceiling place the
kerosene under it, and the fumes of the
oil will overcome the pest and he will fall
into the oil and die instantly. Chicago
Journal.
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