The Columbus journal. (Columbus, Neb.) 1874-1911, April 06, 1881, Image 1

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    J J Lockner 20dcc79
THE JOURNAL.
. i i i ' J-i H-,
RATES OF AWTERTWLKG.
Space. lto 2to lmo 3m fim lyr
lcol'mn $12.00 $20 1 2S j $35 $C0 1 1C0
K I 3.00 12 15 20 36 60
M ' 6.00 1 3 1 12 1 16 1 20 1 35
4 inches) 3.25 7.60 11 14 1 5 I 27
3 " 4.50 6.75 10 12 j 15 20
1 " 1.50 1 2.25 1 4 5 1 8 10
Business and professional cards tea
lines or less space, per annum, ten dol
lars. Legal advertisements at statuta
rates. "Editorial local notices" fifteen
cent a line each insertion. "Local
notices " fire cents a line each Inser
tion. Advertlsmenta classified as "Spe
cial notices" five cents a line first Inser
tion, three cents a line each subsequent
insertion.
IS ISSUED EVKKV WEUNEsDAV,
M. K. TURNER & CO.,
Proprietors and Publisher.
:o:-
v I, IV H I ll -
Ah . iii i
1-
T7
VOL. XL-NO. 49.
COLRBIBm.JfflEft.-WEDJSESDAY, JLRtlL 6, 1881.
WHOLE NO. 569.
' t
Wm
amupat
I t. U '-.IIM'
t
V
.
A
V V
r
A
JSTOfllce, on 11th street., upstairs in
journal building.
Tkums Per year, ?2. Sir months, 1.
Three months . .0c. Single copies, Be.
F. SCHEOK,
Manufacturer and Dealer in
CIGARS AND TOBACCO.
ALL KINDS OP
SMOKING ARTICLES.
Store on Olive St.,nearthe old Post-office
ColumbuB Nebraska. 447-ly
HENRY LTJERS,
BLACKSMITH
AND
Wagon Maker,
Shopi near Foundry, south of A. & . Pfpot.
AH kinds of wood ami Iron work on
Wagon, Buggies Farm Machinery, Ac.
Keeps. on hands the
TIMPKEX SPIIIXG BUGGY,
and other eastern bugyies.
ALSO, THE
"Furst c Brndlev Plows.
MILLINERY! ILLIMY!
AIRS. M. S. DRAKE
HAS .HTST RECEIVED A LARGE
STOCK OF
FALL AND WINTER
ULIHERT m FAICY HIS.
J3"A FULL ASSORTMENT OF EV
F.RYTIUNG BELONGING TO
FIRST-CLASS MILLIN
ERY &TORK. JSl
Twelfth St., trco doors east State Bank:
F. GERBER & CO.,
DKALKRS IX
FURNITURE ,
AND UNDENT AKEKS.
I UUUUIUUUUI UUlUUUUj
TABLES, Etc., Etc.
-:o:-
GIVE HIM A CALL AT HIS PLACE
ON SOUTH SIDE lltli ST.,
One door east of IleinWs drug store.
CITY:-
Meat Market !
One door north of Post-office,
NEBRASKA AVE., - CoInmlHK.
:o:
KKK1 ALL KINDS OK
Presh and Salt Meats,
ALSO
WWM
Etc., in their season.
:o:
Z3T Vault paid for Hide, I.nnl
unci ItucoB.
B42-X
WILL. T. RICHLY,
NEW STORE!
Kkmas Qaum I gsi,
(Successors to HENRY & BRO.)
All customers of the old firm are cor
dially invited to continue their pat
ronage, the same as heretofore; to
gether with as many new custo
mers as wish to purchase
GrOOD GrOODS
For the Least Money. .
STATE BANK,
Si::tM:rt '.: Simri Eui i-i Tzsztx k Eslit.
COLUMBUS, NEBRASKA.
CASH CAPITAL, . $50,000
DIRECTORS:
Lkander Gerhard. Pres'L
Geo. W- Hulst Vice Prcs't.
Julius A Reed.
Edward A. Gkrrard.
Abker Turner, Cashier.
Bask of Deposit, DlncoHBt
aid Exchaage.
CellectleaK Promptly lYIadeoa
all Petals.
Pay Interext oh Time Depot.
its. 274
LUBKER &
Booksellers
-) DEALERS IX (-
Sewing Machines, Organs,
Small Musical Instruments,
Sheet Music, Toys and Fancy Goods.
iSTIf you want anything in our line, Rive us a call. We sell none bnt first
cIuhm sooiIn, at the lowest living: prices.
SINGER SEWING
CORAER I3tk AiyO
ADVERTISEMENTS.
END SPRINGS,
PLATFORM SPRINGS,
WHITNEY A BREWSTER
SIDE SPRINGS,
Light Pleasure and Business Wag
ons of all Descriptions.
We are pleased to invite the attention
of the public to the fact that we have
just received a car load of Wapous and
Buggies of all descriptions, and that we
are' the sole agents for the counties ol
Platte, Butler, Boone, Madison, Merrick,
Polk aud York, for the celebrated
CORTLAND WAGON COMFY,
or Cortland, New York, and that we are
ortering thee wagons cheaper tbau any
other wagon built of same material,
style and Gnish can be sold for in this
county.
jSTSend for Catalogue and Price-list.
PI1II.. CAI.-V,
484-tf Columbus, Neb.
AJvnsRiOAJsr
MEDICAL 1 SUM IN5TOL
5. T. IHTCHTLL, K. S. D. T. KABTTW. U. S
C. S. L'ECS, M. D., & J. C. irillSE, U. D., efOli.
Consulting Physicians and Surgeons.
For the treatment of all classes of Sur
gery and deformities; acute and
chronic diseases, diseases of the eye
aud ear, etc., etc.,
Columbus, Neb.
JEWELRY STORE
OF
G. HELTKEMPER,
ON ELEVENTH STREET,
Opposite Speice & North's land-oflice.
lias on hand a tine selected
stock of
,C1
REPAIRING A SPECIALTY.
JSTALL GOODS SOLD, ENGRAVED
FREE OF CIIARGE.I
Call and see. No trouble to show
goods. G19-3m
Wm. SCHILZ,
Manufacturer and Dealer In
BOOTS AND SHOES!
A romplrte mortmmt of Ladle' and Chil
dren' Shoes k;pt on hand.
All Work Warranted!!
Oar blotto Good stock, excellent
work and fair prices.
Especial Attention paid to Repairing
Cor. Olive and 19th St.
BECKER & WELCH,
PROPRIETORS OF
SHELL CREEK MILLS.
MANUFACTURERS & WHOLE
SALE DEALERS IN" ' -
FLOUR AND MEAL.
OFTJCE.COL UMB US, WEB.
rTn&af0flLH St K faf h
ass 14L rOMHlBMMMMMMMMBl HI BvJ BK If
r- JBaC4MMMMMMMMMMMMM . IB JPJ BB t -a
PlfS
ns
oclffl ana Jewelry
CRAMER,
Stationers,
MACHINES at $25.
OLIV.E.TREETrf;
&th. ..
mRRKR Sc KXOHEL,
7 AT TUK
-
HEAT MARKET ! i
On Eleventh Street,
Where meats are almost given away
for cash.
Beefper lb., from S10cts.
Best steak, per lb., 10 "
Mutton, per lb., from 0 10 "
Sausage, per lb.i from 8J0 "
ISTSpecial prices to hotel?. SC2-ly
TTENRT OASS,
Manujactnrer and dealer in .
Wooden and Metalic Burial Caskets
All kinds and sizes of KebcN, also
has the sole right to manufac
ture and sell the
Smith's Hammock Reclining Chair.
Cabinet Turning aud Scroll work. Pic
tures, Picture Frames and Mouldings,
Looking-glass Plates, "Walnut Lumber,
etc., etc. COLUMBUS, NEB..
Dr. A. HEINTZ,
DEALKK IX
MIS. HEDICIIES. CHEMICALS
Fine Soaps, Brushes,
PERFUMERY, Etc., Etc.,
And all articles usually kept on hand by
Druggists.
Physicians Prescriptions Carefully
Compatinded.
Eleventh street, near Foundry.
COLUMBUS, : NEBRASKA
ANDERSON &, ROEN,
BANKEES,
KTJCYKNTn ST.,
COLUMBUS, NEBRASKA.
JtSTDeposlts received, and interest paid
on time deposits.
$5TPrompt attention giyen to collec
tions and proceeds remitted on day of
payment.
XSTFassage tu:kets to or from European
points by best lines at lowest rates. r
tiSTUralts on principal points in Eu
rope. -o
REFERENCES AND CORRESPONDENTS:
t
First National Bank,. Decorah, Iowa.
Allan & Co., Chicago.
Omaha National Bank, Omaha.
First National Bank, Chicago.
Kountze Bros., N. Y.
SPEICE & NO'df E,
General Agents for the Sale of
ReaVEstate.
Union Pacific, and Midland Pacific
R. R. Lands for sale atfrom3.001o10.00
per acre for cash, or on five 'or ten year
time, in annual payments to. suit pur
chasers. We 'have also a Jorge and
choice lot of other lands, improved and
unimproved, forsale at low price and
on reasonable terms. Also business and
rcbidence lots Jn the city. "We keep a
eomplete-abstract of title to all real es.
tate in Platte County. "
6.13 . COLUMBUS, AEB.
4
LAND, FAMS,
AND-
crapmsAo
AT THE
Union Pacfic Land.Office,
, On Xong ' Tivies and loto. rate
of Interest.
All wishing to buy Rail Road. Lands
or Improved Paras wlM! find, into 'iEeir
advantage to call at the U. P. Land
Office before Iookin' elsewhere as il
make a specialty of buying and selling
lands on commission; all persons wish
ing to sell farms or unimprqved land
will find it to their advantage to leave
their lands -with Wfc'foTtaaJe.-as'-Biytfs-cilities
foraflfeclingSates-are unsur
passed. I am, prepared to make final
proof for all parties wishing to get a
patent for their homesteads.
83nenry Cordes, Clerk, writes and
speaks German.
SAMUEL C." SMITH,
Agt. U. P. Land Department,
555-yj - Gl COLUilBUS, NEB.
.BUSINESS CARDS,' , ,
z
CORNELIUS fc SULlilVA.
a mmn pwv v.r A T T. a nri
n-J- ksaij.1 -"- tJ-t- i"" " ,
A
Up-stairs In Gluck Bui)ding, Alth street,
Above the New bank."
TOHN J. ITIAUGHAIV, " L
JUSTICE OI THE PEACE AND
NOTAIiY PUBLIC, ,
PLATTK CENTER, - - r'NxB.
H. r J. IUJUSO, . ,
NOTJLRY PUBLIC,
ISth Street, 2, doors (pett of paannoad House,
Columbits, Neb. 4Pl-y
D
R. n. 1. XHURSION,
RESIDENT DENTIST.
Office over corner of 11th andNorth-st.
Ail operations first-clas-s aud warranted.
"tlUCAGO BARBER SHOP!
HENRY WOODS, Prop'r.
13"E very thing in first-class style.
Also keep the best of cigars. 010-y
jlTcAI.HSTEJt BROS.,
A TTOBNE YS AT LA W,
Office up-stairs in McAllister's build
ing. 11th St. W. A. McAllister, Noiary
Public.
Tf II. KIJSrilF.,
Ilth St., nearly opp. Gluck's store,
Sells Harness, Saddles, Collars, Whips,
Blankets, Curry Combs," Brushes, etc.,
at the lowest possible prices. Repairs
promptly attended to.
"Vr J.THOMPSON,
NOTARY PUBLIC
And General Collection Agent,
St. Edwards, Boone Co., Neb.
NOTICE!
IF YOU haye any real estate for sale,
if you wish to buy either in or out
of the city, if you wish to trade citj
property for lands, or lauds for city
property, give us a call.
WaDSWOUTH & JOSSKLYX.
NKLaOH MILLKTT. BYROX MILLKTT,
Justice of the Peace aud
Notary Public.
N. IULLETT A: HON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Columbus,
Nebraska. N. B. They will give
close attention to all business entrusted
to them. IMS'.
T OUISSCHREIBER,
BLACKSMITH AND WAGON MAKER.
All kinds of repairing done on short
notice. Buggies, Wagons, etc., made to
order, and all work guaranteed.
jSTShop opposite the " Tattersall,"
Olive Street. fi2f
F.
jr. SCIIUG, in. !.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Columlust Ng.
Office Corner of North and Eleventh
Sts., up-stairs in Gluck's brick building.
Consultation in German and English.
T7-M. BURGESS,
Dealer in REAL ESTATE,
CONVEYANCER, COLLECTOR,
AOT W2UBANCI A3Z1JT,
GENOA. NANCK CO., ... NKB.
O LATTERY .t PEARSALL
ARE PREPARED, WITH
FIRST- CLASS APPA RA TUS,
To remove houses at reasonable
rates. Give them a call.
T S. MURDOCK & SON,
"' Carpenters and Contractors.
Have had an extended experience, and
will guarantee satisfaction in work.
All kinds of repairing done on short
notice. Our motto is, Good work and
fair prices. Call and give us an oppor
tunity to estimate for you. J3TShop on
13th St., one door west of, Friedhof &
Co's. store, Columbus, Ncbr. 483-y
LAW, REAL ESTATE
AND GENERAL
COLLECTION OFFICE
BY
W.S.GEER
MONEY TO LOAN in small lots on
farm property, time one to three
years. Farms with some improvements
bought and sold. Office for tbe-present
at the Clotber House, Columbus, Neb.
473-k
COLUMBUS
Restaurant- and Saloon!
E. D. SHEEHAN, Proprietor.
ISyWholesale and Retail Dealer in For
eign Wines, Liquors and Cigars, Dub
lin Stout, Scotch and English Ales.
VSTKentucky Whiskies a Specialty.
OYSTERS in their season, by the case
can or dish.
11th Street, South of Depot
!
NEBRASKA HOUSE,
S. J. MARMOY, Prop'r.
Nebraska Ave., South of Depot,
COLUMBUS, NEB.
A new house, newly furnished. Good
accommodations. Board by day or
week at reasonable rates.
tBTiSetm a. First-Class Table.
H ,
JIealB,....25Cents. Lodgings.... 25 Cts
38-Stf
"THE HEIRESS LOVERS.
r, t , ,
.isl-WVre going to take some city
DQaxderSj'salcL Farmer Paraone, as
be pat bis packages of sugar and tea
iatothe big basket bo bad (brought
to tbejtore in bis wagon. 'Wife and
I will be down to fetch 'em to-morrow.
;Tlere is, a lady and some
children and a young lady, a great
beiress. She is iu mourniug for the
.uncle that left the property ; so she
can't go tQ,taJively place. Quite a
younggal andKVery pretty. Two
poundai of raisins, Mr. Jones, and
some curjrantsjjx jeckon a ipound'll
do.'
News ie newB in the country. The
farmer's audience listened intently.
The doctor youug Dr. Pari who
bad. stepped in for letters the store
was also the post oliice took note of
every word, and Marcus Morelaud,
who had come to post a letter also,
remembered what the old man had
said. A b ho walked away, 'Pretty
young girl,' he said (o himself. 'An
heiress gets the reputation of being
pretty; probably she is not half so
nice-looking as Farmer Parsons' own
daughters. Heiresses are apt to
think too much of themselves.'
'An heiress. Well I shall go over
to see Parsons pretty soon. No
place like the country for a court
ship, and a fellow who marries an
heiress needu't wait year iu and
year .out to build up his practice. I
wonder bow much she is really
wortli? A great heiress. That
oughtn't to mean less than a hundred
thousand dollars. I should like a
wife with a nice little bank account
of that size. Young and pretty, too,
is a rare chance,' said the doctor, as
he jumped into his gig.
The city boarders came next day.
The loungers at the store saw them
get into the wagon a fat young
matron aud three little girls, a nurso,
a baby aud a young lady dressed in
mourning. The store-keeper's wife
noticed the elegant cut of the over
skirl which the latter wore and more
than oue saw the diamond ring Hash
ou her linger; but il was just dark,
and the beauty was not a settled
point, for no one could see her face.
Marcus Moreland, who was tbe
poor clergyman's son, and had just
fought his way through college with
a prospect of teaching the male de
partment of the district school that
winter a9 his begt.one, while work
ing in his father's garden the next
morning, was placed iu a position to
judge ou this matter.
He heard a little scream, and look
ing up saw a very pretty young
lady and a very pre'.iy little boy
flying iu terror from a perfectly
harmless, broad-faced, white milch
cow, who, in the excess of her con
tent, as sh,e stood deep in the water
of a pond, chewing-tbe end, had
elevated her nostrils, and turning
her slow, brown eyeB in the direction
of the pedestrians uttered a long
moo-o-o.
'Oh!' screamed the young lady,
faintly, 'can't you run faster, Tom
my ? I think she's coming after us.'
'I beg your pardon, ma'am, but
mooly won't touch you. She would
not hurt anyone. She is perfect!'
harmless. See !' cried Marcus, as he
approached the pond side and patted
the white head. 'See wet have had
her ten years, and she is tbe gentlest
creature.'
'I'm .quite ashamed of myself, but
I'm not used to cows. I thought f'd
make her angry, and when you have
other people's children with you it's
such a responsibility. Tom, don't
touch the gentleman's flowers. I'm
ashamed of yousaid the youug lady.'
For city Tom, with a general idea
that the country belonged to every
body, w&s helping himself to roses.
Of coarse, after that, Marcus pick
ed flowers for Tom aud a boquet for
the young lady ; and as she walked
bewitcbingly up the road, with the
flowers against her pretty chin, de
cided that the beiress certainly was
tbe loveliest thing that bis eyes bad
ever rested upon.
That afternoon Dr. Purl rode over
to Mrs. Parsons', made a call, and
Was introduced; decided that tbe
heiress was a beauty, conversed with
her in a manner calculated to prove
that he at least was no country
bumpkin, made a point of looking
at his beautiful watch before be left,
and bad the satisfaction of feeling
that he had made an impression.
Meanwhile Marcus Moreland had
"been thinking about ber more than
she guessed, and that evening there
was another introduction.
Marcus did not make big eyes at
ber, nor try to show hiB superiority
to bis neighbors, neither bad he any
gold watch to consult. lie was
younger than the doctor by ten
years, and very much of a boy still,
and tbe rising moon found May, and
ber little cousin Tom, and Marcus,
all sitting together on tbe lower
step of the porch, talking of black
berrying, as three children might.
The heiress wore a linen dress and
a'knot of blue ribbon in her' hair.
Marcus forgot that she was an heir
ess. It was ouly a dear little girl,
just the nicest creature he ever met,
who looked at him frankly with her
blue eyes real blue eyes, not blue
gray. He went home in the first
stages of love, and sat at the window
looking at tbe moon, and thinking
of her nearly all the night.
May Dimple wag' very inexperi
enced, and very willing to think tbe
best of everybody. At eighteen she
was mistress of a flue fortune, aud,
being an orphan, her own mistress
altogether. Her heart was yet a
white, unwritten sheet, and tbe first
win it. Vague longings for that
peculiar tenderness which only a
lover cau offer already possessed her
soul, and she was just tbe sort of a
little woman to forget ber own ad
vantages and feel very grateful for
love and admiration. The doctor
was tall aud fine-looking, and she
caught herself blushing as she look
ed into the glass after his departuro,
and thought what a soft look had
come into his eyes as he 'hoped they
should soon meet together again.'
May had never had anything like
a beau in ber life. Shut up with an
invalid uncle iu a. great city home
that was like a prison seeing no
ono but the 'doctor and nurso, and
then some old gentleman whom
her uncle was persuaded to admit
on the score of old friendship she
had no idea that she might bo a
belle. Life was all new to her.
Eveu her cousin was a new-found
relative who had taken to her when
the friends gathered at the old man's
funeral.
People wbo bad never remember
ed little Slay until the news of her
heiresship brought her to notice had
been so very kind since. The lib
erty she eujoyed made the quiet
country-house a very happy place;
and now two admirers dawned upon
her horizon at once, and made life
'perfectly splendid' to May, much as
the situation would have bored
many an experienced belle.
Matters naturally assumed this
form aB the time passed on. May
had two lovers and hardly knew
which she liked best.
Marcus did not make love be did
not-dare but looked it. The doctor
made love scientifically; he bad
pumped tbe farmer, who believed
that the young lady's fortune was
'something more tbau common.' He
had eveu extracted from the mar
ried cousin a statemont that 'Uncle
left everything to May.'
He bad three months to work in
before tbe heiress knew her power,
and learned, from one gray winter,
that lovers follow money thick and
fast, and he was a determined sort of
a fellow where there was anything
to get.
Marcus bad no plans. His boy's
hearl ran away with bim that was
all. He could not keep away from
May's side, nor forget her when they
were apart; aud so summer passed
and autumn approached, and the city
folks were going home, and the dis
trict school was to be opened, and
Cousin Helen's husband (a hard
driven Wall street man) came down
to spend a week before he took his
family home, and all this delightful
time was at an end.
Marcus was t be examined for
bis position as teacher of the school
a mere form with his fine educa
tion. The doctor, as a learned gen
tleman, was one of a committee to
examine the coming school-ma'am
for the girls' department.
'A pleasanter task,' -as he said,
jestingly, 'if he expected to see any
body there but only old Miss Cyn
thia Alderny and old Miss Baker.'
May heard a good deal of the
school, especially as Farmer Parsons
was another of tbe committee,, and
she felt an interest in it, too, a Mar
cus was to teach. It seemed so odd
to think of.
Cousin Helen's husband went
about as men usually do, and heard
more in a day than the ladies could
in a year. He returned one evening
with a solemn face and informed hiB
wife in confidence that the talk ol
the whole place was May's fortune,
and that the doctor, who had done
nothing but run after rich women
since he came to tbe place, was said
to be 'after it.'
A regular fortune-hunter, my
dear,' said the husband. 'You must
use your influence with poor May.'
May, meanwhile, had been in her
favorite grove, and there had Mar
cus'Moreland betaken himself to say
good-bye. Poor boy, be bad had
some bitter hourB of late. Tbe fact
that May's love was the one thing
worth having upon earth had dawn
ed upon him and with it the knowl
edge that he had no right to ofler
himself to an heiress. How he hated
her money. It stood between them
like an awful spell. If she had been
the poorest girl living be could have
said all that was in his heart to her
not now.
So the poor boy uttered a few fal
tering words and went bis way.
'It was folly for me to think that
he liked me much,' said May, as he
left her. 'How formal and cold
after all our sociability,' and a little
pang nipped her heart, and she
smiled more brightly on the doctor
when be eutered tbe grove than she
had ever smiled before.
Ho made love to ber that afternoon
after true story-book fashion. On
the stage at 'a, ho would have
caused tender-hearted ladies to Bay
now sweet.' It was a pretty little
scene rehearsed in private. Had
May but known it tbe night before;
and no eirl could have failed to
imSersfariunis 'partXng'words :
'To-morrow before you leave I
must see you. You will grant me a
private interview, will you not? I
have something of intense import
ance, to myself, at least, to say to
you. You will let me see you in tbe
garden ? I I ' a falter, a look, a
snatch at her hand, a touch of his
lips upoif it.
Then the curtain should have
dropped. He rode away in his gig,
and said to himself:
'I always was a lucky fe!!6w to
think that Providence should have
sent an heiress to such a place as
this; a pretty oue, tool'
When May entered the house a
surprise awaited her. Cousin Helen
took her at once to ber bedroom, and
there, behind closed doors, repeated
her husband's information.
'You know yon are so young and
inexperienced,' said she, 'and a fortune-hunter
is such a dreadful
creature.'
May's face flushed crimson.
'Do you really think nobody could
love me for myself?' she asked in a
sudden fit of indignation.
Then common sense came to her
aid. She sat quiet for awhile, aud
then drew near her cousin and whis
pered something in her ear. It was
a long whisper.
'It will prove him,' she said aloud ;
'and you will help me?'
Cousin Helen promised, and May
retired to her own room, there to
shed a few not unnatural tears.
Night passed the morning came.
The school bouse doors were set
open for the first time for months.
Tbe committee was to meet at eleven
to examino the candidates for the
teacher' positions.
Old Farmer Parsons walked over,
also Farmer Brown. The doctor
was there, and the lawyer, Mr. Trip
hammer. Miss Cuythia Alderny
was seen walking toward the door
with a defiant face. Miss Baker
followed with a scared one. Marcus
Moreland took bis way in, and just
as all settled into their seats a little
figure in buff linen, with a blue
ribboned hat on its head, slipped
into one of the doors and stood
among them.
'Miss Dimple!' said the doctor,
advancing with a gallant air.
"Yes, sir,' said May, quietly. 'I
understand you examine candidates
to-day. I am fond of teaching, and
when one must do something one
seizes every chance, you know. May
I be examined ?'
'I suppose you are jesting, Miss
Dimple?' said the doctor.
'Not I,' said May. 'I snppose yon
have heard that foolish story about
me. Two or three hundred dollars
may be a very pleasant little sum to
spend on a summer vacation, bnt it
doesn't make one a great beireBB,
you know.'
'Folks will talk,' said Farmer Par
sons, with a twinkle In his eye.
'A poor gal is as respectable as a
rich one, -long as she conducts
proper. Set yon down, Miss Dimple.'
The doctor retired to his seat, his
face pale and rigid. Marcns More
laud, on tbe contrary, had flushed
scarlet.
May's two lovers were a strange
contrast at that moment. For her
own part she was quieter and sadder
and more womanly than usual.
She went through tbe examination
bravely, under the fire of Miss
Cynthia's indignant eyes and amid
Miss Baker's despondent aighs.
Then she walked home and waited,
as she promised, in tbe garden.
Would the doctor keep his engage
ment? He did.
'My dear Miss Dimple,' said he, as
he advanced gayly, but not qnite
naturally, 'I feared I should scarcely
get here in time to bid you good-by.
I'm sorry the committee think yon
too young for the place. They've
given it to Miss Cynthia. Really, it
would be very dull for you, very. I
told you I had something very par
ticular to 9ay to you didn't I ? You
remember, I see; I didn't think you
would. I wanted to say .that I have
really enjoyed your little viBit to
this place so much. LadieB' society
is a treat to a poor old bachelor doc
tor, who expects to be a bachelor all
his life, by the way. You know
what the society is here, Miss Dim-
pie, and you've quite brightened the
summer for me. I've had a treat.
So that's what I wanted to tell you
and bid you a last good-bye
The man who had made such des
perate love to her the other day, who
had defined bis intentions toward
ber in a manner that no girl could
misunderstand, had slipped calmly
and smoothly out of the affair, and
she could match him in coolnesi,
girl as she was.
They shook hands.
'.Adieu,' said the doctor, with the
true partisan accent, and jumped
iuto his gig, thankiBg Hearea that
he had escaped making mi offer to a
poor girl. - . , , r
Tho heiress stood by the gate
where he bad left her, thanking
Heaven much more devoutly for her
escape. Yet I shall not say sho was
happy. It was not in nature; for
she had thought this man ber true,
earnest lover. The first bitter tbo't
that had ever troubled her yonng
heart filled it now ; her first glimpse
of real life was taken. As she stood
there she began to doubt whether
there was such a thing as true love.
A tear or two fell ; she wiped them
away and through the mist that
veiled her eyes she saw a bright,
ardent young face strangely iu con
trast with the cool, formal, unmoved
couuteuauce, with its handsome fea
tures and practiced smile, that bad
just passed from before her vision.
It was the face of Marcus Moreland,
aud before she was aware of his In
tention he had passed his arm around
her waist and kissed her.
'If I never may again, I must
now said he. 'I have never dared
to tell you while I thought you ao
rich, but I have loved you since the
first day we met. We are both
poor; let me tight the battle of Ufa
for you. I can do it I will do it.
God always prospers loves like
mine
The twilight shadows were creep
ing over the sceue. The distant
mountains were losing the faint
rose-tips that they had worn. A
soft, sweet breeze swept up from tbe
meadows full of the fragrance of
grass and clover. Did these things
bring the sudden calm and sweet
ness to May's wounded heart?
She stood still, making Marcus no
answer; but she did not repulse
bim.
'Tell me that you like me a little
pleaded the boy.
'I do like you, Marcus,' said May,
'but don't say ati) more Just now;
I can't tell you why; but this is not
the time I I jubI say good-by,
now, Marcus. I must go away to
morrow ; but I will write to you
'Kemember, my love is life or
death to me,' said Marcus, and they
parted.
One day T7uen May felt that she
had nothing but scorn for ber fortune-bunting
doctor she did write
to Marcus Moreland, and what she
said may be inferred from the fact
that they are to be married wbea
tbe next spring comes, and that the
people at the store, and doubtlesa
the doctor also, know that Farmer
Parsons' pretty young boarder was
really and actually an heiress, and
that Farmer Parson3, a shrewd old
man with plenty of good sense,knew
and approved of the ruso that tested
the heiress' lovers all along.
Grand Island is in a quandary. A
man's wife died. The man was poor
but honest. He owed tbe doctor
$20, and the druggist $10, for atten
dance aud medicine furnished hia
wife in her last illness. Having no
money to pay these bills, he made a
contract with the doctor, wbo was
to take the wife's body for dissec
tion, allowing $30 for tbe same, and
to receipt his own bill and pay tbe
druggist. This was done. The Dr.
paid the druggist hiB $10, receipted
for tbe $20 due himself, and com
menced cutting up tbe body. Ob
jection was made by many citizens
and at length public opinion be
came so strong against tbe proceed
ing that the doctor was compelled
to bury tbe body. Here ia where
the trouble commences. Should
honesty cause a man to submit to
any loss, even to the loss of bis wife ?
A portion of the citizens argue that
since tbe man received no money
from the trade, but merely paid an
honest debt, his action was highly
commendable, and since tbe doctor
bad paid honest money for the sub
ject he was entitled to its possession.
It is the general impression, how
ever, if the papers reflect the senti
ments of the people, that traffic in
dead wives is an enterprise that
should not be encouraged in Ne
braska even in a time of business
depression. Lincoln Globe.
The Irish land league haa thia
week received 3,500, tbe greatest
amount obtained in any one week,
since tbe land league was established.
A child seeing a bill on a telegraph
post: "Oh, mamma, look! Ames
sage baa fallen down."
K