The Norfolk weekly news-journal. (Norfolk, Neb.) 1900-19??, April 15, 1904, Page 4, Image 4

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    TIIK NORFOLK NtiWS : I'MUim. ' MMNI , lo. 11)04 )
THE NORFOLK NEWS
\V. > . Ill MO , rulilMirr.
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IMIl.t.
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Kvery tiny except Suiulny. lly rnr-
rli . . ' . i > ui- .u .MII inih
poatontfo ilolhery , jier your. JC 00 , lly
nmll on niml nuuoa mill niili > lili ) ol
Norfolk , | u > r JIMII- , | SOO
\VIKKI\ :
The New * . li > tnlitl hi tl. 1SSI
Tim Jniiliint. 1Sln1 > ll 1utd. 1877.
Kvery Friday. Hy mull per year. Jl.SO.
ICnlorcil t thu iioxtniitro Hi Norfolk.
Noli. , us wcpomt olnmi innttnr.
Telephone * : Killlnrlnl Doimrtmmit ,
No. S3. Ihinlni'fM Ollli-u Hint .loll ItouillR.
N'o. .1 ! ! . _
Don't IOHO Bight of thu fact tliul
next week comes Arbor tiny.
If Hits docwn't nmUo you think of
Arbor ilny ami trco planting , It
should.
Typewriters litivo boon known to
ImlU when H comei to roconlliu ; such
ittunoa ns I'ptropavlovsh.
Nebnwkn will Imvo spring when
atlior localities nro exporlnoolng win-
in Stand up for Nebraska.
It come * direct from hemliinartor *
that the weather mnn In busy pro-
otno nf his best for Nebraska.
The hull Benson has opened In Now
Vork nnd It will not tnko long Tor the
oiUliunlnsm to spread ever Uio face of
Uio entire country.
The theatre will soon be compelled
to give up Its place in the Interest of
Uio amusement loving people In favor
of base bull and other out door sports.
Those who will got the host ndvant
ngo from Norfolk's certain develop
ment are those now owning property
here or who acquire some at Iholr
onrllest convenience.
The republican state convention
now only a Hlllo moro than a month
In the future and those wanting of
( tco are stirring up the enthusiasm
that will make It worth attending.
Admiral Maknroff was dllllcult
enough , but when It conies to substl
luting Tlojostveiisky , people who llko
to pronounce names that they Vend
about will need to take a now hitch
In tliolr vocabulary.
Every Indication Is that March has
boon encroaching on April's time and
the sooner tlioro Is u cliango to what
Is right , the earlier will the people
quit wishing that they had the run
ning of the weather.
Inmilsltlvo people are beginning to
wonder If It costs any more to send
such names as Krasnallnskl , Uojest-
vonsky , and I'otropnvlovsk ever the
cnblo than it would to send plain
Smith or Jones or Drown.
There Is still a prospect that the
Hosobud bill will pass and receive
the approval of the president. The
opening of the reservation moans
much to this section of the country
nnd such action would bo highly grati
fying to the iieoplo here.
Mr. Hrynn has made numerous nils-
takes , but his greatest will bo record
ed in democratic history as that of
attempting to give his inantlo ever
to the Hearst shoulders. The demo
cratic party might have stood It but
the people of the country , never.
These who arc forecasting the
harvest of the world , and the United
States in particular , are inking
chances of missing It that would
frighten the average woatbor prog-
nostlcator who Is accustomed to
looking for things at long range
The people of Hussia should rise
tip enmasso nnd demand that the
mines bo removed from the harbor at
I'ort Arthur and give the Japanese
free entrance. Certainly such a pro-
coodlng could not prove more dis
astrous than the present arrangement.
Iowa republicans generally are not
attracted by the CummJns idea of
tariff reform and propose to go to the
national convention , prepared to
show that they are in no wise in
favor of furling the Hag of protection
to American industries nnd American
' labor.
Almost any variety of tree known
In the north temperate zone , east or
west , will grow in Nebraska if It Is
planted and given a reasonable
amount of care. Therefore there
should bo no excuse for not planting
a tree or many trees of good variety
this spring.
The mall carrier who decided that
It was an easier Job to destroy letters
than to deliver them will have tlmo
behind the bars , perhaps , to meditate
over the proposition. If ho finds
that ho had a winning plan , it will bo
QUO of the first times that a shirker
of duty over did accomplish anything.
Perhaps , after all , none will be
come so despondent as to attempt
Golf-destruction because Mr. .Bryan
> ii iar < .1 ti , u ! > \\niiM no luiu'r
UBS natliiniil political IHHIII'M except
the column * of hlH purannitl
II-KIUI The American people have
\\lihxliioil greater nhooks and mir
vmnl.
If Mr. Iloni-Ml should micceod In
tending his Inllnonco In Uio pro- con
vention contest to Parker for a
cabinet position the brunt of the Joke
will fall on UIOHO who hnvo boon led
Into undornliiK the Now York
editor for the progldoncy. They should
HiBlRt on having something to ny
about the doul hoforo It Is finally eon-
mutinied.
If you Imvo nothing else In sight
for Uio suminor , what la the mat lei
with leasing it few neres of ground
signing up a contract , and planting
Kiigar hoots. These who have trlud
Imvw made good money In the p.mt
and thin Industry moniiH moro to Nor
fnlk than doon the raining of any
other crop , because It IH here con
vorlod Into the flnlshod product , at
which many men find employment.
The Christian Science Sentinel has
considered It necessary to HOIII ! out
a nuirkod copy denying that Rev.
Mary Baker ISddy Is a doHcendont of
Illght Hon. Sir John MeNolll , ( I. C.
H , of Edinburgh. Scot hind. Really
the statement or the denial IH not of
the greatest Importance. The world
would think It was alive nnd moving
Just the name whether Mrs. 13ddy
had n noble ancestor or not.
Things nro becoming rather serious
when the pupils of the schools In
MlHHOiirl conHlder It necessary to
mix themselves In a race war , the
whlto students , boys nnd glrlH , organ
f/.lng nnd picketing , to keep the color
ed pupils from entering the school
house. They nro evidently learning
something from the adult southern
population , that will not tend to help
matters In regard lo rnco with com
Ing generations.
The sinking of that Russian vessel
with Admiral Maknroff and 700 sail
orn aboard wna one of the most tor-
rlblo of recent war calamities , nnd
the czar's government nnd the Rns
slnii people generally hnvo the
sincere sympathy of Americans. It
Is possible that oven that Japanese
might hnvo wished that they conh'
Imvo gotten the vessel to the button
of the noa without inking all that mass
of humanity down with It.
Pittsburg Is to hnvo relief from the
miffucntlng showers of ore dust thn
Imvo boon stirred up by the founding
nnd manufacturing Industries there
Biich being the decision of the supreme
court. The time may not bo far dls
taut when llfo and health and comfor
will bo considered of greater importance
anco anywhere than any old blast
furnaces or manufacturing Industries.
They will have to learn to do things
without Interfering with the natural
functions of the public.
Renders of other papers will learn
of the drowning of Admiral Mnkaroff
and the sinking of the battleship
1'otropavlovsk with 700 Russians
aboard today , readers of The News
had the story In detail yesterday. This
Is but a sample ofhat The News
Is doing for the Intelligent readers of
Norfolk and North Nebraska every
day. It Is a service that is unexcelled
In this section and with tin example
of this kind before thorn It is not
surprising that people who llko to bo
up lo the times Insist on adding their
names to the mailing list In this of
fice.
That the people of North Nebraska
are wldo awake and appreciate * a
good thing In the newspaper line Is
evidenced by the rate The News Is
receiving subscriptions. There are a
progressive class of readers In this
section of the state who can see no
object in waiting until tomorrow for
the news of the world's happenings
when they nro available loday at a
reasonable rate. There Is some satis
faction in ondoavor'ng ' to please a
people who Imvo a proper conception
of enterprise.
Yon Nebraska people who have
thought that the blizzard of the other
day in this state was the extreme
limit , nro invited to direct your gaze
to western Minnesota nnd North Da
kota , where two and a half foot of
snow foil and was piled into great
drifts by the terrific wind that ac
companied the storm and where the
temperature foil to a point near zero.
Minnesota nnd North Dakota will bo
digging out for the next two weeks
In order to resume communication
with the world , while the result of
Nebraska's storm 1ms entirely dis
appeared. When Nebraska draws
something bad out of the weather
man's pack it can always bo depended
upon that other sections fared worse.
Hon. Frank 'Nelson ' of Nlobrara is
a leader for the honor of represent
ing the Third congressional dls-
triii < IH oni' of the dolegutvH to the
national rr | > ul > llcnn convention , and
his friends have no doubt that ho will
ho chimcn for that honorary position
when the convention nMomhlcM lit
Coluinhim on May 27. AM chairman
of the county central committee of
KIIOV county , Mr. Nolnon has perform
ed valuable Horvlco for his parly , and
his county In prepared to lunlnt on hl
recognition by the Third district con
vention.
Tlioro IH a brief rocoHH Just now bo-
twooit the tlmo of holding municipal
oloelloiiH and that for the convening
of Hluto and district conventions that
will open the HeiiHon for the election
this fall. It IH the right tlmo to look
over the Hold nnd take a llnu Htand
for holler politics anil moro upright
olllclals. The pcoplo can govern If
they will IIHHOII themselves by taking
an Interest In Uio prollinlnarle.s early
nnd maintaining their enthusiasm
until the last convention Is hold. The
situation Is In their hands , but they
must assert thomosolvos early and
constantly.
A. ( InltiHha of Rod Cloud has many
friends In the northern part of the
Btate who are interested in his candid
acy for the position of secrotnry of
Htuto and nro convinced that the re
publican party could not do bottei
than to place his name before the pee
pic. Ho Is an enthusiastic republican
an honest gentleman , popular will
tliuso who have had Uio pleasure of
hla acquaintance and thorough ! }
qualified to perform the duties of that
olllco. It Is certain that if the re
publican ticket Is composed of as
good material as Mr. Caluslia It wll
go through with a snap and vigor thu
will win.
From this tlmo forward north No *
braska will bo devoting Its host oner
; los to producing nnd arranging one
> f the beauteous countries that lay
out of doors. Other sections of Hit
world may have pretty scenery , hu
there are few localities that can bet
tor arrange- pleasing combination
of worth and beauty than north Ne
braska during the Hprlng add suminor
season. It will bo worth the tlmo
and money of anyone to take a trip
out and look ever the valleys of the
Ulkhorn and the Norlhfork at any time
after about the first of May , when na
ture has clothed the sccno with gen
erous verdure.
Aroused by the mention of his
*
u'amo In connection with political
position , ox Supreme Judge J. J. Snl-
llvan of Columbus has been led to
declare his attitude In the mater of
politics In the following expressive
and emphatic language ; "Ono might
suppose from recent newspaper refer
ences to mo Unit 1 am a standing pos
tulant for public favor. The truth Is
I hnvo had ciunigh. My political am-
blllon has been saicd. 1 am not a
candidate , active or receptive , ram
pant or coitchant , for any public of-
flee , place or position in the gift of
the democratic party. The party has
boon mighty good lo mo and 1 am
entirely content henceforth to servo
In the ranks. " These of his admirers
who have been slating him to some
day load his party to victory will ,
therefore , hereinafter count him out
when It comes to political considera
tion.
It Is dilllcult for republicans to
make any decisive pro convention at
tacks on the democratIc policy as it
Is a wide guess on what that policy
will bo. Judge Parker refuses to
give up his opinions on national poli
tics and Mr. llryan has suddenly do-
lormlnod to close up tighter than a
clam on national Issues. It Is use
less to look to the democratic record
In congress for an indication of how
the wind is blowing nnd the history
of the party fails to disclose any re
liable Indication , because with the
free trade , free silver , anti-imperial
ism , anti-militarism , anti-e.xpansion
and other paramount issues of Uio
past hopelessly confused there Is no
chance of picking on the right one ,
for they may all bo cast aside and
something entirely now thrust on the
attention of the public. History docs
disclose the fact that democratic
policies and administrations have
never proven of advantage to the people
ple of the country , while republican
rule has boon bonellclal , which will
answer until such time as the demo
crats may bo able to arrange a pro
gram for the coming campaign.
Arbor day is not very far distant-
less than two weeks and It is prob
able that people who should plant
trees this spring and have spaces
that would bo materially Improved
thereby have not given the matter a
moment's consideration. It is an Im
provement that is greatly needed in
this section of the state and not a
spring should bo permitted to pass
without the placing of thousands of
trees where they would do the most
good to the country. Especially Is
this true of fruit trees. This country
di-u l | , n along the fruit line and
II It iii > \ \ InekH In the trc-os , to bo-
emu of value an a producer of the
mrdlur varieties of frnllH. The
rchardH and treed that Imvo been
limited have been doing magnificent
orvlcu and Iholr iiumberH should bo
ncronHod. In the way of shade and
trnamental trees hardwood should bo
avored. Nebraska IH passing the cot-
onwooil and boxoldor stage and these
recB should bo mipcrcodod by those
hat will develop beauty and value at
ho Hiimo tlmo. Every property owner
Hhould Iliul a little to do In the trco
limiting line each spring and Homo
of them should do considerably more
him others.
Some farmers and land owners
mvo not boon able to tlgnro that the
growing of trees Is a money-making
proposition considered au a crop alone
without counting on their value In
the conservation of moistureand in
adding fertility to the still and bene
fiting the lands In their near vicinity.
Because they may not be getting ix
turns each year from their trees they
have considered the land devoted to
groves and orchards nnd shade trees
as little better than wasted. That
the tree crop Is a paying crop Is
proven , however. A circular Issued
from the bureau of forestry of the
United States department of agricul
ture says on this subject : "Prof.
Chns. K. Bosscy of the University of
Nebraska , maintains that even foi
fuel the growth of cottouwood Itmbei
Is a vary remunerative business , since
the cottonwood is capable of produc
ing moro heat units per acre pel
annum than any other tree adapted
to the middle west. The cottonwool
makes good lumber for dlmonsloi
stuff , nnd will attain a slzo largo
enough for sawlogs In twenty years
The hardy catnlpa on rich soil wll
produce moro fence posts per acre
In a shorter lime than any othoi
species. Some eatalpa plantations li
Kansas have paid G per cent com
pound Interest on the land and labo
invested , nnd ? 10 an acre per annum
not profit , for a period of twenty
years. This Is a much greater in
come than the average return from
agriculture. '
The democrats have boon starting
In with exaggerated statements early
in Uio campaign , and they are being
hoomoranged back about ns soon no
they land. One of these statements
is to the effect that the naval steam
yacht Mayflower has been appropri
ated to the use of the president at a
great cost to the people. Representa
tive Foss has looked up the May
flower's record and finds that It is
subject to the orders of the ward de
partment nnd that It has been used
by Hie president , as ho has a perfect
right to do. But for being n private
presidential pleasure yacht at govern
ment expense , there Is nothing to the
clinrgo. During the past twenty-two
months the Mayflower has cruised
22.000 miles. The president has spent
aboard her at various times a total
of something loss than forty hours and
has traveled ninety-four miles. He
was detained on board by storm dur
ing one night and all of these forty
hours , except on one occasion were
in the performance of the president's
olllclal duty. It is a pretty small
country and a small people \\lio will
object to devoting a boat to Its chief
olllccr for the time the Mayflower
was used by the president , but then
the democrats must maintain a ropu
tatlon for fault finding.
It was thirty-nino years ago today
that the hand of an assassin laid low
America's most famous war president ,
Abraham Lincoln , nnd there will be
few persons , old enough to remember
the tragedy , to whom the anniversary
will not appeal with strong effect
oven at this remote time since Lincoln
was laid low. Following so closely
after the exciting events of the civil
war , tills tragedy will go down In his
tory as ono of the most touching since
civilization began. No ruler ever had
as strong love from the people of ono
sect Ion of his country or as bitter
hate from the people of another sec
tion , nnd none wore taken in the cli
max of a wonderful career as was
Lincoln. Looked at now , it is pos
sible that Mr. Lincoln surrendered his
life for the bettor interest of n
country alarmingly divided. The i <
sassinatlon was an action that was
not approved by broad-minded , fair-
dealing southerners , and the hat
red of the south by the north was
the beginning of the healing of the
wquml between the two sections ,
which perhaps might not have boon
ns easy or certain of accomplishment
if President Lincoln had continued to
occupy the executive chair of the
nation. It was a collossal crime , but
only a lightheaded actor was respon
sible. Today it is llttlo moro than
an anniversary. The present genera
tion realizes llttlo of the Intense feel
ing at that period and in tlmo it maybe
bo forgotten that Mr. Lincoln was
killed , and only ho remembered that
ho lived.
YANKTON , NORFOLK AND SOUTH
ERN IS REVIVED.
WILL GO SOUTH TO KANSAS CITY
Already the Privilege to Build a
Bridge Over the Missouri River for
the Accommodation of This Line ,
Has Been Granted by Congress.
The Sioux City Journal says :
Again , and for about the "umptl-
eth" tlmo. the Yankton. Norfolk nnd
Southwestern railroad scheme Is bo
ng revived. Alfred E. Case , of Chicago
cage , an attorney for ono sot of the
londholdcrs , who has Just driven
iver the old right of way , arrived in
Slonx City yesterday from Yankton.
Mr. Case was pleased with the
country of eastern Nebraska. Ho be
loved the territory to ho ono of the
richest In the great agricultural do
main of the middle west. That the
proposed line would be built over the
old survey through Norfolk nnd on
to Omaha he had no doubt , and he
even expressed the opinion that the
road would bo extended from Omaha
t i Kansas City.
When an Inquiry was made of Mr
Case as to whether ho had been asked
to take any of the securities of the
construction company , ho said :
"Yes , the matter has been men
tioned to mo , nnd I simply came our
to look It ovor. The promoters talk
of making two separate corporations
to control the bridge at Yankton ami
the railroad itself , but my advice
would bo to have but one concern to
control It nil , to avoid friction anil
avoid ono company taking any ad
vantage of the other. If the bridge
and the railroad ventures were
merged the company would then bo
In a position to lease Its bridge am
tracks to other roads or make a sorl
of belt line out of It. It is already
pretty generally known that the per
mlt lo construct the bridge over the
Missouri at Yankton was sccuroi
from the present session of congress
1 would not be surprised to see ac
live stops taken there real soon , al
though I understand no organization
has as yet been effected. "
AT THE AUDITORIUM THEATER
If'rntn Wi .Inrsd.iv's Dnllv 1
John Griffith in "Macbeth. "
When Mr. Shakespeare comes to
town in Norfolk , unless he is represented
sented by a startling or cxtraordlnnr >
attraction , you will find a poor house
nt the Auditorium. It was a slln
crowd that greeted Mr. John Grlilltl
In "Micbeth" last night. Mr. Grif
flth himself was laboring under the
Jiincu'tles ' of a bad cold and fouiu
it hard to speak. He betrayed the
elements of a clever actor , however
and was well received. He had de
livered a lecture during the nfternooi
sit the High School. This was the
first tlmo that Shakespeare's trag
edy of Tiurnham woods nnd Duiial
nnne has been presented in Norfolk
The night-walking scene is alway
Impressive \\hen Lady Macbeth at
tempts to wash out the "damnec
spots" of blood from her hands. I
has been suggested by an nrchltec
in Norfolk that the reason for the ill !
ficulty In hearing clearly at the Not
folk p'dyhoiidO Js caused by the dlf
feiontly heated pit and stage and th
rush of air from ono to the other
wlien the curtain rises , causinir the
actors to speak their lines In a cur
rent of wind.
A singular coincidence is noted in
the company last night. The mnn-
igc. ' presenting Mr. UrlflUh is John
M. H'ekey. ' Hy transposing the "M"
and the "H" it reads John H. Mickey
Nebraska's governor.
TO PREVENT EROSION.
Plan to Stop Caving of River Banks
Has Government Approval.
The dopnrtmont of agriculture , bu
reau of forestry , suggests the follow
ing scheme proposed by E. Daylos of
Linwood , Kansas , to prevent the
rivers and streams from eating away
the banks and destroying farm lands.
The plan may bo of value to farmers
and others In this section of the
country :
"Green willow poles IS to 20 foot'
long are secured in the spring , Just
after the Ice goes out of the stream.
These poles are laid on the ground
near the bank 2 foot apart , with their
butts all pointing toward the river.
Woven fence wire Is then stretched
along ever the poles and stapled fast
to each ono. Sections of wire about
100 feet long can be handled to best
advantage. After the wire has been
securely fastened to the poles , they
are all pushed over the bank togeth
er , so that the butts of the pojes will
fall and sink Into the soft mud at the
wafer's edge. As the bank caves off
some of the falling soil will lodge on j
the wiro. partially burying and ,
weighting down the poles , which will i
consequently strike root and grow. J
The wire will serve to hold the mass I
of willows together until they have
become firmly rooted. The ends of' '
the woven wire should bo made fast
to wire cables running back ever the
bank some distance , nnd fastened to
posts sot firmly In the ground. The
caving nnd erosion of the hank will
soon round off Its top corners , and
Uio growing willows at the water's
- - * * v- * -
edge will catch the soil as It rolls
down the declivity , causing a bank
to form of Just the right slope to re
sist erosion most effectually. "
ARRANGE FOR FUTURE SERIES
Entertainment Course Closed With
Everett Kemp and Another Is
Planned for Next Winter.
The last entertainment of the uiiloit
ecture course , In which the young
eople's societies of Hovornl Norfolk
hurchcs were Interested , was ono of
ho best of the season. Everett
\oiup. In Intorprottlvo recitals , la
ortalnly an adept In the entertain-
mont field and the pcoplo attending
were entertained throughout. Mr.
Kemp opened the evening with a
number of brief sketches In which ho
demonstrated four different ways of
telling stories , and when ho came to j
giving "Sovenouks" In live acts ho
hod the Interest of his auditors thor- t
oiighly aroused. His delineation of v
ho various characters In the plcco-
and Interpretation of the parts was
lone with exceeding grace and vor-
atlllty.
So pleased were the patrons of the I
course that when It was proposed to
arrange for another course of outer-
alnment next winter thcro were
eady responses and the movement
was set on foot for n bettor ami
stronger series of entertainment than
even next season.
MODERN WOODMEN ENTERTAIN
Three Hundred People Have a Big
Night of It at Nellgh as Guests
of Fraternity.
Nellgh , Nob. , April 13. Special to
rho News : A crowd of 300 people
were entertained In Oieslker's hall
last night by the Modern Woodman
lodge of this city , and ono of the
most enjoyable evenings of the winter -
tor season was spent by the pcoplo
in attendance.
A line spread of good things was
served , and entertainment was by tho-
"Automatic Warblers , " a local orga
nization that had their program of.
amusement down to a system.
Catarrh Cannot be Cured ,
with local applications , as they can
not reach the scat of the disease. Ca -
tarrh Is a blood or constitutional dis
ease , and in order to cure it yoit
must take internal remedies. Hall's
Catarrh Cure is taken internally and
acts directly on the blood and mu
cous surfaces. Hall's Catarrh Cure
is not a quack medicine. It was pre
scribed by ono of the best physicians
in this country for years and is a
regular prescription. It is composed
of the host tonics known , combined
with the best blood purifiers , acting
dlreotly on the mucous surfaces. The
perfect combination of the two in
gredients Is what produces such won
derful results iu curing catarrh. .
Send for testimonials free.
F. J. Cheney & Co. , Props. ,
Toledo , Ohio.
Sold by druggists , price 75c. , * *
Take Hull's Family Pills for con- ) '
slipation.
A Cure for Headache. i
Any man , woman or child suffering
from headache , biliousness or a dull
drowsy feeling should take one or
two of DeWltt's Little Eearly Risers
night and morning. Tlioso famous
little pills are famous because they
are a tonic ns well as a pill. While
they cleanse the system they
strengthen nnd rebuild U by their
tonic effect upon the liver and bow-
? lo. Sold by Asa K. Leonard.
After this It will be the thing
for all veterans of the civil war to
draw on Uncle Sam for a pension. The
government is beginning to get gen
erously appreciative of the services
'endered the union by the old soldiers.
" I suffered terribly and was ex
tremely \\eak for 12 years. The
doctors said my hlo'od was all
turning to water. At last I tried
| Ayer's Saisaparilla , and was soon
j feeling all right again. "
j Mrs. J.V. . Fiala , Hadlyme , Ct.
No matter how long you
have been ill , nor "how
] ' poorly you may be today ,
'
j Ayer's Sarsaparilla is the
best
| medicine you can
take for purifying and
en
riching the blood.
Don't doubt it , put your
whole trust in it , throw
away even-thing else.
An ib.olute .peclfl. .nd ntl. ept | .
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