The Falls City tribune. (Falls City, Neb.) 1904-191?, September 04, 1908, Image 2

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    Some Political Potpourri
THE YEAR THAT KANSAS WENT
FOR BRYAN
It was in 18% that Bryan car
ried Kansas. The “situation’’
that year was “significant” and
“ominous,” as the Kansas politi
cians say, from the opening to the
close of the campaign. Condi
tions were ripe for a Bryan land
slide in the state. Four years of
depression in the commercial
worid had, in the vernacular of
the street, "put Kansas to the
had." Corn sold in Hutchinson,
Wichita, Salina and in other
towns in the state for ten cents a
bushel and wheat was fifty to
fiftytbree in Kansas City. Cattle
and hogs were a burden upon the
market, and horses could not he
sold at any price. There was no
work for the laboring men and
the tradesmen wefe idle. The
people had nothing to do hut talk
politics, and Kansas remembers
well how the voters improved the
time that year
In every town groups of men
were to be found at almost every
street corner every day in the
week discussing free silver. Tliev
“followed the shade” and shouted
for Bryan. In the forenoon they
congregated on the east side of
the street and in the afternoon on
the west side, and they blocked
the sidewalks. It was more indi
cative even than the campaigns of
1800 and 1802 when the Populists
swept the state.
The Democratic papers every
week contained the names of pro
minent Republicans who had an
nounced their intention to vote
the Democratic ticket. In every
community they literally flocked
to Bryan. And yet they carried
the state for the Nebraska man
by only 12,000. with the Demo
crats, Populists. Free Silver Re
publicans and Socialists all united
for him.
The conditions this year, neitli
er political nor financial, hold out
no such hope for Bryan. The
price of wheat in Kansas City
yesterday was ninety-four cents;
in 18% on the same date wheat
sold for fifty-two cents. Yester
day corn sold for seventy-eight
cents; in 18% it sold for twenty
cents. Yesterday the Kansas far
mers sold their fat cattle on the
Kansas City market for $7 40 to
$7.60 per hundred pounds; in
1896 they brought only $4 00.
Yesterday they sold their fat hogs
for $0.65 to $6.67; in 1806 the
price was $5.10 to $3.25. And the
bank clearings ii: Kansas City,
where Kansas transacts its busi
ness, amounted to 36 million dol
lars last week, as against 0 mil
lions twelve years ago.
And besides, everybody is busy
in Kansas. From Argentine to
Syracuse it would be difficult to
find a man who would take the
time to ‘‘argue” a single political
question and that makes the
“situation” as “ominous” for Bry
an as it w-as for the Republicans
in 1896.
BALTIMORE SUN FOR TAFT
It is said that even a straw
will indicate which way the
wind blows. The steady growth
of the Taft sentiment is pleasing
to all republicans. As the rec
ords of the two men and of the
two parties are studied, a steady
drift of sentiment to Mr. Taft as
the better man tor president to
succeed Mr. Roosevelt will be
seen.
'Plie latest acquisition ol Mr.
Taft's is that of The Baltimore
Sun, The Sun is the strongest
and most intluential Democratic
paper of the state of Maryland.
Alter a careful study of the two
speeches of acceptance of tne
two candidates, it renounces
Bryan and declares for Taft.
This action of the Sun insures
Maryland as a Taft state in No
vember. Among other reasons
given for its support ot the re
publican candidate, the Sun
gives the following:
*1 It is the judgment of the Sun
that the material welfare of the
people ol the United States, in
dustrial and financial, would be
promoted to a greater degree by
the election of Mr. Taft than by
the election of Mr. Bryan and
that their rights would be safe
guarded as carefully by Mr.
Talt as by Mr. Bryan. Fine
phrases do not multiply the av
enues of employment. Epi
grams butter no bread and start
no factories. Repartee and
ready debate do not raise the
scale of wages. We believe the
welfare of the nation would be
sate in the hands of a president
of Mr. Taft’s temperament and
calm judgment, and, for this
reason, we favor his election to
the presidency. ’’
This is plain language for a
democratic paper which sup
ported Mr. Bryan in his last race
for the presidency, but is only
an indication of the views held
by the calm and solid judgment
of the best minds ot the nation.
FARMERS CATECHiSM FOR 1908
Now, Air. Nebraska Farmer, it
is your turn to stand up and an
swer:
Question: Mr. Farmer, what did
the last democratic nat ional admin
istration give you?
Answer: Ten cent corn and 2A
cent hogs.
Question: Mr. Farmer, what did
the last democratic-populist ad
ministration of Nebraska give you?
Answer: No relief from exorbi
tant freight rates, railroad domi
nation and aggression; reckless ex
penditure of the taxpayer’s money;
an increased state debt and large
deficiencies; mismanagement of
public affairs generally, and of
state institutions particularly.
Question: Mr. Farmer, what did
the McKinley and Roosevelt ad
ministrations give you?
Answer: Seventy cent corn, six
Falls City, Neb.
TUESDAY, SEPTEM I 15
Magnificent Street Parade and
Concerts Morning and Evening
4
Speaking in Auditorium by
HON. JNO. MATTES
of Nebraska City
AND OTHER PROMINENT SPEAKERS
TWO MILITARY BANDS
Hiawatha and Falls City will furnish music
Grand Display of Fireworks
Reduced Rates on All Railroads
cent hogs: peace, prosperity and
plenty; debts paid and money in
the bank.
Question: Mr. Farmer, what has
the Ust republican administration
of Nebraska given you?
Answer: Reduction of freight
rates; reduction of express rates;
two-ceut passenger fare; reduction
of the state debt a million dollars;
abolished free passes: established
the railway commission; enacted
the pure food laws; managed the
state institutions economically and
efficiently and in a score of impor
tant issues provided a “square
deal” against the interests which
unjustly strive tu “farm the far
mer.”
Question: Mr. Farmer, do you
wish tu change all this by voting
for a change just for the sake of a
“change?” or do you wish to hold
fast to what you have and add to it
in progress, prosperity, justice and
square dealing by continuing your
support to the republican party
and its candidates, state and na
tional?
Answer: The answer will come
with the farmers vote in November.
He will not trftde prosperity for
promises nor money in the bank
for a mortgage on “the home
place.”
OLD STAGE MAN SEES CODY
john W. Dorrington Tells of Real
Wild West
John W- Dorrington, who Fri
day evening watched the Buffalo
Bill Wild West from the grand
stand, is the Dorrington who
“rode the mails’’ from Falls City
to Topeka in 1859 and crossed
Colonel William F. Cody’s line of
the Pony Express, which extend
ed 250 miles west to St. Joseph.
He watched the performance with
more than ordinary interest.
“In 1859 and 1860 I crossed
Buffalo Bill’s line at Powhattan
and we waved our hats at each
other, as he tore .across the
prairies in the furious races with
express, changing horses every
eight or ten miles, dodging or
fighting Indians but always suc
ceeding in getting his express
through. Cody was a young
fellow then and after all the hard
years it is nothing short of mar
velous that he should still be at
the head of his wild west.”
Mr. Dorrington is now a cap
italist, engaged in mining and
agriculture at Yuma, Ariz He is
visiting in Omaha for a few days
with his nephew, John W. Towle,
having come to Nebraska to at
tend a reunion of the descendents
of David Dorrington at Falls City
where forty-three members of the
family gathered to renew acquain
tances.
It was John W. Dorrington
with his brother Frederick M.,
who started the first daylight
stage between Omaha and Lin
coln, going by way of Platts
mouth, where a night stage was
making regular trips to Lincoln.
The headquarters in Omaha was
in the old Douglas hotel.
There was no town between
Plattsmouth and Lincoln except
Weeping Water and it was only
a settlement. The country was
rough and the Indians were bad"
said the old plainsman. “I have
since been all over the west and
went to the Pacific coast on one
of the first trains ever run over
the Union Pacific railroad, but
I have never known a tribe of
Indians capable of making so
much trouble as the Sioux In
dians did in the early days. All
Indians I have seen since pale
into insignificance when it comes
to a test of bravery. I have
seen and known tribes which
would not as much as attack
an express rider, stage coach or
train unless they had the drop
on the white people, and others
which would not fight after
night under any circumstances,
but the Sioux Indians—they were
simply ready for a fight and for
trouble against most any kind of
odds, any place, day or night,
and they got a good many riders."
In the Sully campaign Mr.Dor
rington served in Company G of
the original Second Nebraska,
rhised by Colonel Robert Furnas
The Dorringtons were the first
family of FallsCity and intimate
ly connected with pioneer history
in southeastern Nebraska.—Oma
ha Bee
D. S. flcCarthy
DRAY AND
TRANSFER
Prompt attention given
to the removal of house
hold goods.
PHONE NO. 211
C. H. MARION
AUCTIONEER,
Sales conducted in
scientific and busi
nesslike manner
C. H. MARION
Falls City, Nebraska
DR. H. T. HAHN
VETERINARIAN
Office and residence first door
north of city park. Phone 2(5d.
FALLS CITY, NEBRASKA
EDGAR R. MATHERS
DENTIST
Phones: Nos. 177, 217
Sam’l. Wahl Building
J)R: M. L. WILSON
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON
Office and Residence over
McMillan’s Drug Store.
Phone 329. FALLS CITY, NEB.
John Wiptse
ATTORNEY
Practice in Various Courts.
Collections Attended To.
Notary Public. FALLS CITY
____
Vi. P. ROBERTS
DEIN'TIBT'
Office over Kerr’s Pharmacy
Office Phone 260 Residence Phone 271 '
-■■ • .
W. S. FAST
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Phones: \ ^ide"ce ,f!0 .
| Office oo
FALLS CITY, NEBRASKA
DR. C. N. ALLISON
Phone 248 Over Richardson County
Bank.
FALLS CITY, NEBRASKA
The Cough Syrup that
rids the system of a cold
by acting as a cathartic on the
bowels is
BEES
LAXATIVE
COUGH SYRUP
Bees is the original laxative cough syrup,
contains no opiates, gently moves the
bowels, carrying the cold off through the
natural channels, Guaranteed to givo
satisfaction or money refunded.
_ A. G. WANNER
Stop That Cold
To check early colds or Grippe with "Preventics"
means sure defeat for Pneumonia. To stop a cold
with Preventics is safer than to let it run and be
obliged to cure It afterwards. To be sure. Pre
ventics will cure even a deeply seated cold, but
taken early—at the sneeze stage—they break, or
head oil these early colds. That’s surely better.
That's why they aro called Preventics.
IToventlesaro little Candy Cold Cures. No Quin
ine. no physic, nothing sickening. Nice for the
children—and thoroughly safe too. If yon feel
chilly, if you sneeze, if you ache all oyer, think of
Preventics. Promptness may also save half your
usual sickness. And don't forgot your child, if
there is feverishness, nightorday. Herein prob
ably lies Preventics' greatest efficiency. 6old In
6c boxes for the pocket, also in 25c boxes of 48
Preventics. Insist on your druggists giving you
Preventics
(ALL DEALERS)
-,
SEPTEMBER
EXCURSION
RATES
GO NOW
VISIT THE OLD HOME
Low rate excursions to east
ern cities a n d resorts.
Northern Michigan, Canada
and New England, daily un
til September 30th.
TO THE WEST
Attractive 1 o w excursion
rates daily to the Pacific
Coast, Yellowstone Park,
Utah, Colorado, Pig- Horn
.Mountains and the Plack
Hills.
LOW COLONIST RATES
During September and Oc
tober to Puget Sound, Cal
ifornia and hundreds of in
termediate points.
IRRIGATED FARM LAIN PS
Ready for Immediate
Settlement.
a t Garland and Powell,
Wyo. Personally conduct
ed excursions to these lands
the first and third Tuesdays
of each month. Govern
ment engineer at Powell
shows the land. Also deed
ed and Carey Act lands.
Write D. Clem Dcaver. General Afft
Land Seekers’ Information Rureau,
Omaha, for new folder. It- free.
Write a brief description of your
proposed trip, and let us advise you
how to make it the best way at the
least cost.
e. G. WHITFORD,
Local Tickcl Agent.
L. W. WArtELEY, G. P. A.,
Omaha, Neb.
Magic Lantern
For the Boy or Girl
Any boy or girl who will se
cure eight new subscriber for
the Kansas City Weekly Journal,
at 25 cents a year each, making
a total of Two Dollars, and send
the full amount, together with
the names to us, we will mail to
his or her address a beautiful
Magic Lantern with fifty views.
Any boy or girl can use it. Just
stretch a white sheet on the wall
and you can have all kinds of
fun. Full directions for use is
with the lantern.
Any bo3r or girl can secure 8
new subscribers in a short time
and get this beautiful magic
lantern. Send for samples for
canvassing. Send all money by
post office money order or draft,
Address—
TheKansas City Journal
Kansas City, Mo.
Passenger Trains
South Bound
Tr. 104—St. Louis Mail and Ex
press .1:23 p. m.
Tr. 106—Kansas City Exp., 3:41 a. in.
North Bound
Tr. 103—Nebraska Mail and Ex
press.1:52 p. re.
Tr. 105—Omaha Express... .2:23 a. m.
Local Frt. Trains Carrying Passengers
North Bound
Tr. 102—To Atchison.11:10 a. in.
South Bound
Tr. 191—To Auburn.1:23 p. m.
J. B. VARNER. Agent