The McCook tribune. (McCook, Neb.) 1886-1936, July 23, 1897, Image 5

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    lit MPWCi > CIXiXP < iXXXfXiC0Cg § !
. | Clearing r. - §
| | | Out Sale. . . I
| f Having accumulated a large Ng |
B\\ ly lot of small sizes in Ladies' Shoes m
I i.t m AND Slippers , I will dispose of $8
31 | | 1 them at tlie following'prices : | | |
| | | A ! ! 2- Sizes , $1 a Pair. 1
\k \ I AM 3 to 3 Size8.S.25aPar. ! !
I I All 4to4Slzesl.50a Pair. |
[ / | | gj The former prices of these | |
! ) ffl shoes were from $2 to $5. Your gl
I • S little girls can wear them. Come
L | SS an < * see * e waYe many more of OS
I Jp such hargains at the only p |
h\ mi l -IP 1Q1P10P \ flPP 8
f Hfl J. F. GANSCHOW , McCook , ggj
If H THE NEW-YORK WEEKLY TRIBUNE § Jf
I \ # ? & | p2s- EVERY member of WS |
$ K fwl tHHSIH EVERY farm , in pjjg *
\ * ) & f EVERY village , in * j $
H' Wr EVERY State and Ter. fe
* \ \ \
Hv. sfes < & r P lSK for Noble Manhooa' vfc
Ww\ Pn * * gives all important news of the jjw
u \ jfc $ Nation and World , the most reliable | fe $
If SJ P market reportsbrilliant and instruegjkjp
| \ Sfra tive editorials , fascinating short stofi $
fc&S ries , an unexcelled agricultural de- &
Wm K SJ ? $ partment , scientific and mechanical B/gi
1 / * 33/ information , illustrated fashion artij& j
I l3 eles , humorous illustrations , etc. , etc. 5 *
I a Sr ? $ " SiTft
f § 2 THE TRIBTINE ANI ) N- WEEKLY TRIBUNE 1 YEAR KjSjJ
R gg FOR $1.50 , CASH Iff ADVANCE. gj
I * P Address all Orders to THE McCOOK TRIBUNE. SJgp
f WPW HV/fe your name and address on a postal card , send it to Geo. W. Best , 2
I \ § § ? ? Tribune office. New York City , and a sampie copy of the New-York Weekly Tribune § /M ?
I * I A CAMPAIGN OF EDUCATION. j |
IV pj HOW TO GET IT FOR § 3.50. j | |
Wk s W I ° e e ucate one must read pOH
pg AN . . the best literature- :
H\ hj l The best literature is expen- f jt
& Unparalleled sive- scl
m \ -1-
Wm\ \ SCI - - - " " Leslie's Illustrated Weekly , | Q
K P OFFER. published at no Fifth Avenue , ' ? = = s
r BC ( New York , is full of the best = J j
Bt cr 2 : • - things. Its illustrations are |
BTi , j l superb ; its stories charming ; and its literary departments arej \ $
H | ftv l edited -with consummate skill. l j
RI yr > aj Such a paper is a great popular educator. It should be in 1
WtS \ f i every home. 1/yCI
i ! | The subscription price of Leslie's is $4 per annum. % / r p
Wt J3FI We make the unparalleled offer of a copy of Leslie's Illusj j y
I j& trated Weekly and a copy of our own weekly for one year , at j j
1 Sol only $3,5 ° for boUl * 9
9f r / jV No such offer was ever made before. No such offer will ever f M
} y % . | be made again. = f
lw * 1 Remit by postal order or check to jl i
lr R ! THE TRIBUNE > McCook , Neb. j l
"
v
pMiTIMR TABLE. [ gH |
ttUW UcCOOZ , ITIBSACIi. . { WwiiWl
LINCOLN , DENVER ,
OMAHA , HELENA ,
CHICAGO. BUTTE ,
ST. JOSEPH , PORTLAND.
KANSAS CITY , SALT LAKE CITY ,
ST. LOUIS AND all SAN FRANCISCO ,
TOINTS EAST AND AND AI.X. TOINTS
SOUTH. WEST.
TRAINS LEAVE AS FOLLOWS :
CENTRAL TIME.
No. 2. Vestibuled Express daily ,
Lincoln , Omaha , St. Joe ,
Kansas City , St. Louis.Chi-
cage , and all points south
ana east 5:55 A.M.
No. 4. Local Express , daily , Lin
coln , Omaha , Chicago , apd
all points east 9:00 r. M.
N0.148. Freight , daily , ex. Sunday ,
Hastings ana intermediate
stations 5:00 A. M.
No. 76. Freight , daily , Oxford , Hol-
drege , Hastings. . . . 6:45 A.M.
No. 80. Freight , daily , Hastings and
intermediate stations 7:00 A. M
MOUNTAIN TIME.
No. 5. Local Express , daily , Den
ver and intermediate sta
tions Si5 r. M.
No. 3. Vestibuled Express , daily ,
Denver and all points in
Colo.Utah and California , 11:40 P.M.
N0.149. Freight , daily , ex. Sunday ,
Akron and intennediatesta-
tions 6:00 A. M.
No. 77. Freight , dailyStrattonI5en
kelman , Haigler , Wray and
Akron 3:20 P. M.
No. 63. Freight , daily.Stratton.IJen-
kelman , Haigler , Wrayand
Akron 5:00 P. M.
N0.175. Accommodation , Mondays.
Wednesdays and Fridays ,
Imperial and intermediate
stations 7:00 A. M.
Sleeping , dining and reclining chair cars
( seats free ) on through trains. Tickets sold
and baggage checked to any point in the
United States or Canada.
For information , time tables , maps and
tickets , call on or write C. E. Magner , Agent ,
McCook , Nebraska , or J. Francis , General
Passenger Agent , Omaha , Nebraska.
Ham mocks at prices
ranging from 75 cts.
to $5.50 at
MCCONISTELL'S.
RAILROAD NEWS ITEMS.
Supt. Campbell went up to Denver ,
Monday evening.
No. 5 Sunday night was made up of the
Burlington's new style cars.
Mrs. Thomas Enright was a passenger
on 2 , this morning , for the east.
, Train-master Josselyn , Orleans , was at
headquarters , briefly , Saturday.
Desirable hosiery and neckwear at the
Famous Clothing Co.
Supply Agent C. H. Quereau was up
from Plattsmouth , Sunday on business.
Tom Wilkinson visited his friends here
over Sunday , coining in on 3 , Saturday
night , and leaving on 2 , Monday morn
ing.
Will Brewer has resigned his position
as express agent at Red Cloud and will
go to Chicago as soon as his successor
reports for duty.
Will Krauter , wife and children of
Aurora , Illinois , arrived in the city , last
Friday evening. Mrs. Krauter will make
her parents , Mr.and Mrs. J. S. LeHew , a
long visit.
J. E. Robison and wife are camping at
the Crete Chautauqua grounds just now
with a party of relatives. Mr. Robison
is improving in health and he expects to
return to work , first of next month.
Fireman Charles Benedict entertained
his sister Miss Lena Benedict of Fairbury
aud brother F. E. Benedict , wife and
children of Waverly , Sunday. The3"
came in from the east Saturday evening ,
and left on Sunday evening for Pueblo ,
where they will visit , together with
other Colorado points.
The Empire state express on the New
York Central broke the record of ever } '
railroad in the world , last Friday after
noon , when it made the distance be
tween Syracuse and Buffalo , 14S.S miles
in 137 minutes. The fastest time was
made from the top of the hill west of
Batavia to East Buffalo , thirty-two miles
in twenty-six minutes.
Clarence E. Burton , ticket agent at
Sedalia , Missouri , died of consumption ,
Sunday night , between here and Oxford.
The deceased was en route for California ,
when death overtook him. His mother
was with him. The remains were brought
here and were bPade & Son prepared
for shipment. The body was forwarded
to Louisville , Kansas , Tuesday morning ,
for burial. The deceased was but 22
years of age.
The B. & M. civil engineers were here
the past week laying out new tracks and
arranging for coal chutes which will be
built west of the water tank. The coal
will be run up in cars on a elevated track
and put in bins arranged so that by open
ing the chutes an engine tender can be
filled as easr as to take water. Thus
doing away with the tedious handling of
coal in buckets which now prevails. Part
of the material for the foundation has
come and new material is coming most
every day. It is expected that worlcwill
be commenced in the near future and
that there will be work enough to keep
a large gang of men at work several
weeks. When this is completed the
present unsightly coal sheds will be torn
down and the danger of that crossing
will be abated Holdrege Citizen-Forum.
DeWitt's Colic & Cholera Cure ,
Pleasant , Quick Results , Sate to take.
BHiiaKfliSHfiaEi
* " " " ' - - ' - - • > " " 'V W > fj
vzy
. . . . " ' • *
I THE BEAVER VALLEY.
A View of the Orleans-St. Francis Country
as it Appears July 20th.
Atwood , Kansas , July 21 , 1897 ( Spe-
to The McCook Tribune. ) From Or
leans to Atwood and beyond , a stretch of
about 100 miles , is the area of the wheat
belt that is harvested and will add its
quota to the coming prosperity of this
section.
Along the pathway of the Burlington
as one looks on either side of the bands of
steel is a panorama of agricultural beauty ,
the golden sheaves dot the stubble fields
and the cone-shaped stacks loom up near
and far as harbingers of better times.
Thousands of acres of purpling alfalfa
blooming in the mid-summer sun , each
blosom a perfect cup of fragrance scents
the air and the rustling blades of dark
green corn with its silk and tassel making
one vast emerald sen till lost to view.
The panorama presented before us pain
ted in all the hues of the rainbow amber ,
gold , green , red and royal purple , with
the darksome sheen of the serpentine
groves that fringe the Beaver , is a pic
ture that awakens the lover of nature.
The liyht of better times shines through
out the valley of the Beaver and the
gloom of other days enl } ' remains as a
memory.
Here on the 20th of July , approaching
the goal of completement of general crops
corn is nearing the harbor of security ,
and with another good rain like that of
the 19th inst. , the king of grain will
pass sister wheat , whose victory is already
achieved.
Wheat has won laurels in the Orleans
and St. Francis country. In Decatur and
Rawlins counties it will equal or surpass
yearof 1S92 , and from Danbury to Orleans
equal that of 1891. Mr. Underwood of
Danbury has 160 acreson which stands4i
stacks 10 feet wide and the estimated
yield is 25 bushels per acre or 4,000
bushels.
There is much w'heat that will surpass
this and reach the 35 bushel mark. At
Herndon , Kansas , between 30 and 40
harvesters have been sold , this season ,
and more binding twine than at any
point on the Kansas part of the Burling
ton. There will be much wheat shipped
from Herndon , Atwood , Cedar Bluffs ,
Oberlin and points along Hastings and
Oberlin line of the B. & M. It is rumored
that Traer , which has long been a closed
station will be opened this autumn. The
elevator companies are preparing their
granaries for the big wheat crop and
there will not be an idle elevator along
the Beaver. Ricks of alfalfa dot the
meadows of the Beaver waiting to feed
the bovine herds , more than this country
has ever fed before since the da3'S of the
cow-boy period , when the kine roved at
will , twenty or thirty years ago.
With plenty of alfalfa and promising
prospects for corn the stock shipments
will surpass no doubt any year since the
road was built up the Beaver valle- .
With wheat assured the prospects of
better times is being felt. The pulse of
public confidence beats more confidently
and the arteries of trade flow more
regularly. The largest lumber yard of the
line is being finished at Danbury , Ne
braska , and is equipped with spacious
sheds and buildings. The Standard Oil
company has established a supply depot
at Beaver City for the adjacent country
and many marks of coming prosperity
are observed along the line of the Or
leans and St. Francis.
W. L. Krauter went up to Denver on a
short visit , last night.
Switchman F. E. Kidder has been
laid up with a sprained back.
No. 2 consisted of two sections , Sundaj'
on account of returning Endeavorers.
L. W. Stayner of Train-master Ken-
3'on's office was an Edgar pilgrim , Thurs-
daj * .
Switchman J. R. Mowbray of Lincoln
had his thumb smashed Monda- -
, Mondatrjing
to lift a draw-bar.
Conductor and Mrs. C. J. Snell are
looking after the welfare of a daughter ,
born on Saturday last.
Alden P Ely is offduty with an injured
arm. A fellow-workman let a rod fall on
his right arm , Thursday morning.
Brakeman Will McCarl had the thumb i
of his right hand badly smashed between
two freight cars at Minden , Wednesday
night , while making a coupling.
A feeling against the long ruus is developing -
veloping among the locomotive engineers -
neers , which may lead to a change. Notwithstanding -
withstanding the long rests at the termi
nals , the strain in making the runs is
very trying on the nervous system of the
engineer , and it is believed that , while
the practice of long runs for locomotives
may prove popular , long runs for train
crews will not meet with the approbation
of the engineers. Kansas City Star.
Low One-Way Rates
To all points east , via the Burlington {
Route , July 16 , 17 , iS , 19 , 20 , 21 and each <
Friday and Monday thereafter until August - <
gust 13. Go east on any of the above 4
low rate days and you save enough to
cover all the incidental expenses of travel
berth in sleeping car , meals , transfers ,
etc. See nearest B. & . . M. R. R. agent , *
or writetofj. Francis , G. P. A. , Omaha , <
'
Neb. July i6-4ts. ,
i
Hammocks at McMillen's drug store. , ,
' ; , . . . _
'
* * " ' " " ' " ! " ' ' " ' ' ' ' " ' I B
1 CLOSE OUT SALE 1
H op | § I
1 Snmer Dress Goods. I
p n
) j&g We still have a laro-e assortment g& { I
& | | of Hot Weather Dress Goods , but | | | I
If ! they will not last lone * at the Low § & | 1
Prices at which Ave are now offering ggg I
them. Buy now and get a genuine sf I
bargain. & ? $ I
m m 1
& & Ladies ' Shirt Waists at Cost.c m& J
& & sell Ladies ' Ready-Made Wrappers hi I
tm and Dress Skirts. Groceries sold sH I
im right. Try us. ! m I
i
W& AT THE . . . SxfS I
• m I
if aslt n I
S&3 A , M7 lvwVilli sm
BSE " ESr * I
1 _ tore . . . . I I
gfe C. L. DeGROFF & CO. K& I
j
r iy ? J H
pij I fFIRST > m I
H rWNATIONAL l SB I
8 | BANK-4.j H I
| fi Authorized Capital , $100,000. BS I
m Capital and Surplus , $60,000 0
. . . . . .
jXj , , Q
GEO. HOCKNELL President. B. M. FREES V. Pres.
. . . . . .
jfj W. F. LAWSON , Cashier. F. A. PEN NELL , Ass 't Cash. M H
% = & A. CAMPBELL , Director. FRANK HARRIS , Director. jO
. . . , , . . . . . . . _ .
< * 4 * * o T t 1 * # - .y g. • Sf. 1
#
# #
| J V. FRANKLIN , President. A. C. EBERT. Cashier. | | H
% II . I
I CITIZENS BANKS I
ih OF McCOOK , NEB. 4
A $ i H
# Paid Up Capital , $50,000. Surplus , Si0,000 #
# $ >
49 . §
| | -7 DIRECTORS u = = - | | I
5 / . FRANKLIN , N. S. HARW00D , A. C. EBERT , 1 ? H
K H. T. CHURCH , OSCAR CALUHAN , C. H. WILLARD. *
# % I