The McCook tribune. (McCook, Neb.) 1886-1936, July 12, 1895, Image 4

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¶ By F M KIMMELL.
" ? $1.50 A YEAR IN ADVANCE.
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' BEAVER CITY'has two very dis-
j ' ; . . tinet tails to her judgeship kite in
' + ' Norris and McClure.
r
. . .
. ' THE race for the Fourteenth
.4 , District Judgeship has already
, , some interesting features-b u t
-w
theyare chiefly those of incert-
' tude.
.
;
p
a . SLATE making is now a popu-
Jar diversion of the politicians real
: { and would-be. It will be the hi-
w. : larious pleasure of the people , to
fracture and smash many of them
in the sweet by and by.
TIE railroad managers are slow
inf omplying with the law requiring -
; ing that all cars be equipped with
automatic couplers , notwithetand-
. ' log that they are liable to a fine of
, . sin 100 a day for every car they use
in interstate traffic after the first
of July. ' The change in the
; ; ' ' equipment involves an enormous
amount of labor , and for this rea-
5011 the interstate commerce corn-
; mission will probably be lenient
for a few months. But the automatic -
matic brakes must come within a
reasonable time or the fines will
begin piling up at a disastrous
rate.-The Journal.
EASTERN Iowa is admitting a
deficiency in rainfall of more than
, . ten inches in the first half of 1895.
Comilla on top of a deficiency last
year , this makes the farmers along
the Mississippi counties wonder
what their usually favored region
is.coming to. The truth is that
the drouth is so severe in Ohio ,
Indiana and Illinois as to leave
the whole aspect of the country ,
brown and parched. Crops up to
date will hardly reach 50 per cent
of the normal yield , and it will
take early and timely rains to
bring out the corn to a fair aver-
age. Travelers from the east say
that the fields do not begin to look
green and cheerful until Iowa is
reached , and that real plenty is
not reflected from the face of the
landscape until the Missouri river
is crossed. Nebraska is one smil-
ina field of dark , rich green from
the river to the Colorado line.-
Journal.
i GERVER
A good rain last week.
James Fowler won the bicycle
race at Danbury.
Corn looking well though some
fields are weedy.
Sidney Dodge is up early and
late wrestling with the weeds.
Prof. J. H. Fowler was seen
riding his bicycle , Friday of last
week.
The game of ball between Danbury -
bury and Hendley was won by
HendleY . , the scores being 15 to 20.
Sunday school every Sunday
and preaching at the Dodge school
house. Everybody invited to at-
tend.
Fourth of July was observed by
about twenty-five or thirty of the
neighbors of this vicinity , west of
Mr. Thom1ison's place on Dry
creek. At 11 o'clock all had arrived -
rived , and enjoyed themselves
swinging and telling stories. At
about the hour of one the ladies
produced their lunch basket and a
bounteous feast was spread. After -
ter all had gathered around the
table , the divine blessing was in-
yoked by Mr. Relph. Then the
business of sampling pies and
cakes began. After all had their
a
fill ice cream was passed around.
; 1 The evening was passed very
pleasantly ; the principal feature
was the stick race between Eugene
Dunham and Mr. RelPh , two best
out of three won b3 y Dunham. At
5 o'clock all started home , wishing
4th of JulY would come everyday.
INDIANOLA.
Sheriff Banks and Lawyer Starr
were McCook visitors , Thursday.
Marion Powell and wife were
among the passengers for Denver ,
Monday night.
Misses Meserve and Welborn
left for Denver , to attend the educational -
cational convention , Monday night.
Supt. Bayston had to forego his
trip to Denver and the association
meeting on account of sickness in
the family.
Judge Keyes and wife joined
the excursionists to Denver , Monday -
day night , to spend a few days in
the mountains.
Mrs. Harry Barbazette of Mc-
Cook , who has . been the guest of
Mrs. Larry McEntee , returned
home on Sunday , her husband
driving down for her and the chil-
dren.
Secretary Beck of the county
agricultural society was in Mc-
Cook , Tuesday , posting big hangers -
ers and distributing other advertising -
tising matter for the coming fair ,
September 9th to 12th.
Last Friday afternoon , the elegant -
gant farm home of J. W. Dolan ,
about a mile and a half west of
Indianola , was completely destroyed -
troyed by fire. This was one of
the finest dwellings in Red Willow -
low county , a commodious acldi-
tion and other improvements haying -
ing but comparatively recently
been made. While it is not clefi-
nitely known , it is thought that
fire crackers in some way were responsible -
sponsible for the fire. Mrs. Dolan -
lan and son Frank were the only
adult members of the family at
home when the fire was discovered.
They made an effort to extinguish
the blaze for a while , but not being -
ing successful , directed their attention -
tention to removing the goods of
the household. In this , with the
assistance of the people who soon
flocked to the burning home from
the neighborhood and from this
place , they were successful in saving -
ing about everything on the first
floor. The loss on dwelling and
contents will foot up a number of
thousand dollars. There was $1-
500 insurance on the house , and
$1,000 on the furniture , which
will lighten the burden of the loss
considerably. It is a matter of
gratitude and satisfaction , too ,
with Mr. Dolan , that no members
of his devoted household were injured -
jured by the fire or by their heroic -
ic efforts to save the home and its
contents.
RED WILLOW.
We learn that the Misses Cook ,
daughters of Mrs. R. S. Gordon ,
are expected home from Iowa.
The boys at Byfield farm were
glowing with pride when they
learned that their Fourth of July
noise was heard for three miles
distant.
Mr. and Mrs. Berge of India-
nola joined in the Prickett grove
picnic. Mrs. Holland and daughters -
ters also spent a while on the
grounds. Mrs. Helm gave a dinner -
ner on the great occasion.
The Willow folks celebrated Independence -
dependence day by numerous ,
small picnics , fishing parties etc.
Probably as enjoyable as any , was
the little picnic in the Prickett
grove , where a like party met the
year before.
Saturday evening was Walter
Slye's birthday , and the young
people of the Willow greatly enjoyed -
joyed the party which his parents
gave in honor of the occasion.
We are in doubt whether it was
seven or seventy , gallons of ice
cream that was devoured , together
with accessories ; but all united in
saying it was very good ice cream
and in wishing Falter many happy -
py returns of the day.
Ice Cream Soda at -
. ' MoMILLEN'S.
:
Awarded
Highest Honors-World's Fair ,
.DR , .
iIICEJ
CREAM
BAKING
POWDER
MOST PERFECT MADE.
A pure Grape Cream of Tartar Powder. Free
from Ammonia , Alum or any other adulterant ,
40 YEARS THE STANDARD.
COLEMAN.
Wet ? Well , yes , to low water
mark.
Mr. C. W. Lepper's alfalfa is
looking fine.
If the farmers don't down the
weeds the weeds will down the
corn.
The weeds don't stop growing ,
to sleep or rest , but keep "everlast-
ing at it" .
If there is a Russian thistle on
the farm , hunt it up and pull it up
by the roots.
But few from this town , were in
McCook , Saturday , and they were
about all back and in the cornfields
in the afternoon.
If the rain would only let up
and clear off so the farmers could
get into their corn a while , it
would be an appreciated change.
One who has lived here but two
years remarked : "Well , it does
know how to rain in Nebraska , but
it is a wonder it don't know when
to stop" .
The rain Sunday y morning just
poured down ; the heaviest of the
season. It was accompanied by
hail which cut the crops up considerably -
siderably , but corn is coming out
all right yet.
During the storm , Sunday , Mr.
Thos. Real lost' four horses by
lightning , which is a serious loss ,
not because horses are so valuable ,
but because the "wherewith" to
replace them is not lying around
loose , at this time.
A new jack rabbit trap not patented -
ented : Matt Droll was cultivating -
ing corn. His dog started a rabbit -
bit which took right along a corn
row. Matt squatted down in the
row to let it run into his arms.
When the rabbit got to him it
jumped around him but the dog
didn't , as he was not "onto" the
combination. Result : Matt laying -
ing up a few days with his nose in
a sling. Matt is an awful good
hearted fellow , but if you have the
best interests of your wife's husband -
band at heart , don't ask : "What's
the matter ; Mats" ?
DANBURY.
Corn is looking fine.
A nice rain , Tuesday.
Some of the farmers are getting
ready to cut wheat.
Hendley played Danbury ; 19
to 11 , $15.00 purse.
About 2,500 people were on the
grounds here , the Fourth.
D. F. Barker started for a visit
down in Kansas , last week.
The road boss is cutting thistles
down in this neck of the woods.
Ed. Clark of Lebanon bought
up a carload of hogs here , Monday.
Jimmie Fowler won first money
f
in the byke race and John Adlams ,
second.
The Ladies' band of Wilsonville
furnished music here for the
Fourth.
Mrs. Meyers , a former resident
here , is visiting Danbury and vicinity -
ity , this week.
Harris Bros. are expecting to
commence business again by the
first of August.
A. C. Furman and family started
for Fort Collins , Colo. , Sunday ,
for a visit of two months.
br . , , Y
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NORTH DIVIDE NUBBINS ,
This would have been a good
year to get a start of alfalfa.
A. F. Reeves will return from
Placervale , California , about September -
tember first.
Willie Snyder and sister Ella ,
from near McCook , were Divide
visitors one evening last week.
We have some nice corn and a
'
good deal that is simply out of
sight ; can't be seenfor the pesky
weeds.
Rev. Webster , a former pastor
of the M. E. church at Box Elder ,
and family , are visitors at Uncle
Billy Johnson's.
Martha Johnson , who is generally -
ally well liked by the scholars ,
will probably teach the Divide
school again this year.
Corn that is free of weeds and
has plenty of room to grow is coming -
ing right up to the front and will
certainly yield abundantly.
Even the women and children
are moving around quite lively
and making a desperate effort to
get rid of as many weeds as pos-
sible.
"Vanie" Modrell , who has been
absent in Illinois for about a year ,
is expected home early in August ,
to be on hand for the broom corn
harvest.
Emma Hanlein , who has been at
Los Angeles , Cal. , during the past
year. is now at Long Leach and
expresses the hope of being able
to return home soon.
Mike Steltzer , who is working
on a fruit ranch up near Littleton ,
Cole , writes that he is well pleased
with his job and will remain there
the balance of the year.
M. Steltzer expects to harvest
about 250 bushels of good wheat.
Other fields that appeared very
unpromising from time to time
look remarkably well at present.
A variety of nice , large apples
can be seen on the trees in "Jim"
Brady's orchard. Some of the
trees are loaded with choice fruit
in spite of the unfavorable weather
of the past two seasons.
A good rain fell over this neighborhood -
borhood , early Sunday morning.
The hail did no damage here
to speak of , but is said to have
been more or less destructive to
small grain farther north and west.
There's no use trying to keep
track of all the rains , big and lit-
tle. Suffice it to say that everything -
thing is on the boom , and it's
weather like this that causes everyone -
eryone to be in love with Nebras-
ka.
Much discussion is heard hare
and there as regards the merits
and demerits of listing corn. Perhaps -
haps there will always be a good
many in favor of this slack way of
farming , which may be all right
for those who understand it , and
then it's the cause of much grief
and many cuss words for the boy ,
horses and "go devil" .
KANSAS , Missouri and the Indian -
an territory have just b e e n
drenched and redrenched by the
heaviest storms they have experienced -
enced for several years. If existing -
isting theories of the cause of the
hot winds are correct , there will
therefore be no hot winds in Nebraska -
braska this year. Every wind
from the south between now and
the first of August will be laden
with rain provoking vapor instead
of withering heat.-The Journal.
Buy your writing paper at
THE TRIBUNE office. All kinds in
stock and prices very reasonable
WALL PAPER at
MCMILLEN'S.
Ice Cream Soda 5c. at
MCMILLEN'S.
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FAMUUS CLOTHING COMPANY' ' I ,
.
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Goods.
.
Straw Far a'nd Wool Hats -
Thin Coats and Vests
Light Underwear and , hosier
Novelties in Neckwear ,
Colored a11(1 white Shirts
'
All at Pollllal' Prices.
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McCook , Nebraska. , TON AS ENGEL ,
--t-.MANAGER.
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IV } , UDELSY 1 lEIGgTS IBTo:25 : POUNDS PRICEST5.T0100. '
VER l1ACHIf1E FutIY GUARANTEED , ° CATAIbGU@ 5EN1 FOR TJo CENT STA1I I I J
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MAIPI OFFICE ARID ' FACTORY LA ft E l-IAL 5 TED 5T5 I s
ETAIL'I , SAtE ROQMy x280 WAE3ASH AVE . } i
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THE OLD RELIABLE BOOT AND SHOE DEALER.
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THE OLD RELIABLE BOOT AND SHOE DEALER.
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