The McCook tribune. (McCook, Neb.) 1886-1936, June 14, 1895, Image 2

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. : t + M 'COOK TRIBUNE.
F. 3I. KIMMELL , Publlhher.
MCCOOK , I EBRAfihA.
EBRAfihA.a
TAE
Two NEW Postoffices havobeen estab-
; , , : , ' , li shed in Rock county.
Mna HILLROUSE , a highly respected
lady of Creighton , died last week.
' FALLS CITY is to have a telephone
' ' system with out of town connections.
Foun divorces were granted at the
late term of the district court in Dawes
county.
MINNIE BLADO , of Lincoln , aged 16
years old , fell from a plank over Salt
creek and was drowned.
A CAMP of Sons of Veterans has been
mustered in at North Bend with thirty
charter members.
, FREMONT'S graduating class this year
was the largest in the history of the
city's high schooL
IN the first eleven days after it opened -
ed for business the new creamery at
Emerson received 60,956 pounds of
milk :
TIIE Wausau creamery is now receiving -
ing 4,000 pounds of milk per day and
making 1,000 pounds of butter per
week.
# Louis DUMDI , son of Chris Dnmdi ,
who resides four miles south of liebron ,
was kicked by a vicious horse and
killed.
CONTRACTS for more state fair buildings -
ings were let last week. Remaining
contracts will be attended to in a few
days.
TIIE farmers of Colfax , Platte , Madison -
son and Stanton counties will form a
district horticultural society for mutual
I benefit.
1J S. SCitWARTZ , living near Bennett ,
has mysteriously disappeared , and
there is much uneasiness among his
friends.
J. F. ROWAND , who purchased a nice
farm near Burehard , has put in a half
mile track for the benefit of local horse
trainers.
' IN the district court at Chadron the
l
case of Arthur Morrison , the slayer'of
A. V. Harris , was continued until the
September term.
OWING to poor health , Hon. Loran
Clark of Albion has decided to try a
change.of climate and will go with his
family to the Pacific coast.
' BEND J EWING , a resident of Nebraska -
braska City for the past thirty years ,
died last week , aged 48. The deceased
was prominent in Masonic and A. 0. U.
W. circles.
TILE Wauneta mills that were think-
. lug of shutting down on account of
v scarcity of : eater have .a plentiful sup-
t' , tb - - ply since the recent rains and will go
forward as usual.
DUmNG a recent storm the residence
of Mr. French , north of Dorchester ,
was struck by ] ightningand one side of
the roof entirely demolished. None of
the family were seriously hurt.
AN alleged glass-eater was egged out
of town at Gordon because he refused
to give an exhibition after securing a
small collection. He claimed that the
reward was not worth the effort.
Mxs D. R. ENDER , wife of the janitor
of the East school at Fremont , dropped
dead last week. She was apparently
well and hearty a few moments before
Heart disease was the cause of her
death.
T. W. 0. WOLFE , who is under ar
rest in Sidney as an accomplice in the
Cheyenne county murder- well
know in Deuel county , it being he who
surveyed the North river ditches last
winter.
F IANZ WICIIatAN , a prominent farmer -
er living five miles northeast of Norfolk -
folk , died the other day from apoplexy ,
while riding his sulky plow in the field.
Nr. 11'ichman was one of the pioneers
of Madison county.
TIIE mortgage record of Cass county
for May is as follows : Farm property
filed , S65,9c"8.42 ; released , 554,455.36 ;
town property filed , S.i,163.25 ; released ,
5.791.4O ; chattel mortgages filed , $11-
504.50 ; released , $5,642.56.
Titl : remains of W. H. Shoopman , a
railroad man who was bilked in a railroad -
road accident at 1Vest Superior , Wis. ,
accompanied by his wife , arrived in
Seward and was buried in the cemetery -
tery beside those of his father.
CHARLES KIRKI'ATRICii , an old sol-
dier. 75 years of age , living fourteen
miles south of Trenton , was adjudged
insane and will be sent to the asylum
at Lincoln. He had been engaged in
preaching for about forty years.
THE following Nebraska postmasters
have just been appointed : Badger , Holt
county , R. D. Dutton , vice S. E. Smith ;
Eldora , Clay county , E. H. Fifield , vice
Horace Ilkff ; Glen Rock , Nemaha county -
ty , J. N. Simmons , vice Wm. Pierce.
AT South Omaha Catharine Driscoll
has sued thatcity to obtain a judgment
for $3,000 for injuries on account of a
rotten cidewiikk , in the night season of
October 27 # 1594. She claims the city
was negligent in notreparing the walk.
Cilltur county grass is getting a
reputation for its winter feeding prop-
erties. A big herd of horses came to
North Loup from Cherry county and
are fat and sleek. They had no feed
but what they gathered in the sahd
hills range.
A FARMER named Waggoner , 35 years
old , living three miles east of Weeping
Water , was found hanging in his grain
bin. The body was still warm' when
- found , but all efforts to revive him
failed. He leaves a wife and several
small children.
A SUBSCRIPTION paper was started at
Chapman for A. Bailer , whose house
was demolished by a cyclone , and in a
few hours $2200 had been raised. A
new house is in course of construction ,
the work being done gratis by neighbors -
bors and friends.
TuE Taylor-Stauffer rape case in
Burt county resulted , in Taylor being
tarred and feathered and ordered to
leave the county under penalty of
death. Taylor had lured the girl to
the country ; where he assaulted her.
There was talk of lynching him at the
time.
time.WM.
WM. BLAUVELT , who was convicted
at Beaver City of the assassination of
Charles Breithaup , did not wait to receive -
ceive his sentence , but skipped. Blau-
velt was permitted to return to his i
home at Edison on the theory that his
bondsmen were held until sentence
was passed , but he failed to return ,
sputa W the consternation of the court
I
f
- t
'
TILE district convention of the Christian -
tian Endeavorers takes place at Fremont -
mont June 11 , 12 and 13.
TIIE 10-year-old son of S. S. Cheat , a
farmer living a few miles from Humph-
rey , was bitten by a rattlesnake. No
serious results are feared.
TmuE prisoners broke jail at David
City by drilling through the steel floor
and digging under the brick foundation -
tion of the jail. Their names are Arthur -
thur Murphy , John Murray and Chas.
Williams , All were held to the district
courtfor burglary.
E. E. Posr of Scotia , who has been
appointed receiver of the Loup Valley
bank of North Loup , which closed recently -
cently , took possession last week. The
failure is traceable chiefly to the crop
failure of last season , the bank being
the holder of many notes on which it is
now impossible is realize.
TILE citizens of Greely county are
congratulating themselves over the fact
that two-thirds of a year has passed
without being called upon to prosecute
either a felony or misdemeanor case.
The criminals all left Greeley county
months ago. It now boasts of 6,000
good , law-abiding citizens.
MATT WAGONER , a barber by trade ,
was found hanging by the neck at the
home of his father-in-law , Peter An-
aerson , five miles north-east of Weep-
ing..Water. He had made a rope of
binding twine and tied it to a rafter in
the granary. Wagoner had been despondent -
spondent over domestic troubles and
had before threatened suicide.
Three men entered and robbed the
house of Captain S. H. Hunter and M.
Schlaegel , two miles from Nebraska
City , while the folks were absent from
home. Booty to the amount of $350
was secured. Sheriff Huberlee pursued -
sued the robbers and captured two of
them near Wyoming after shard fight
THE independent military company
organized by the State university Cadets -
dets has made arrangements to go teSt
St Louis the last of June and contest
for the prizes at the militia encampment -
ment , lute company has selected the
name of Pershing Rifles , as a compliment -
ment to Lieutenant J. J. 1'ershingwho
has been commander of cadets for four
years.
CHARLES CLIFTON , an attorney of
Fairbury was stabbed three times by a
darkey. He sustained one gash of four
inches across the forehead , another in
the arm and a third in the side , the
knife being prevented from entering
the abdomen by striking his watch
first. The dispute arose over a bill
which Clifton claims the darkey owed
him.
him.AN
AN accident occurred at the Bee Hive
school house , four miles south of hick-
man , which proved fataL It being the
last day of school , upon the program
w'us a game of base ball. One of the
batters let the bat slip through his
hand , striking a little boyaged 7 years ,
son of S. Kallemeyn , in the stomach.
A blood vessel burst and the little fellow -
low died next day.
UNION PACIFIC passenger train No. 6
ran over and instantly killed 1 : . C.
Mathews of Ravenna , Ohio , and fatally
injured Charles Baker of Newberry ,
Ind , so that he died in a few hours.
This occurred about two miles east of
Wood River. The supposition is that
the men were lying on either side of
the track on the ends of the ties asleep
and did not hear the approaching train
until too late to escape.
A SMALL cyclone from the southwest
struck the town of Hampton , doing
considerable damage. A barn belonging -
ing to S. A. Youst was lifted up , carried -
ried fifty feet and set down within live
feet of his house. Mr. Youst had a
valuable horse in the barn at the time ,
but it was not hurt. The barns of G.
Thomas , L. P. Christiansen , M. H.
Kath and the buggy shed of C. H. Feel-
haver , were completely demolished.
MRs. FRED TUItSER of Beatrice placed
her two boys in bed , one an infant of
6 months and the other 2 years old.
She left them a few minutes to go for
a pail of water. Upon returning Mrs.
Turner found the elder boy lying
across the face and breast of the infant -
fant Instantly removing the boy ; the
baby could but partially get its breath
and was in a dying condition. Physicians -
cians were summoned , but the child
died soon after their arrival.
TILE last Nebraska crop bulletin says :
The week opened with two days of
high temperature and hot , south winds ,
very trying to all crops , followed during -
ing the remainder of the week by general -
eral and copious rains in all parts of
the state , which have revived vegetation -
tion and thoroughly saturated the
ground. The temperature for the
week was continuously above the normal -
mal , averaging for the first two days
18 degrees above the normal and 10 degrees -
grees above for the week as a whole.
NEws reached Curtis that , as a result
of the late storm , Mrs. Frank Jennings
lost her life. Her family lives about
twelve miles north in Lincoln county ,
in a sod house. The walls of the house
became soaked from the driving rain ,
and Jennings braced them up and they
stood until three o'clock in the morning -
ing when the north end fell in. A servant -
vant girl , who was sleeping in the
south part , ran to a neighbor's and
help soon came. Mr. Jennings was
taken out almost smothered to death ,
the'little baby was not hurt , but Mrs.
Jennings was found dead.
A CYCLONE started twelve miles
southeast of York and for a distance of
sixteen miles it plaid havoc with farm
houses , barns , corncribs , windmills and
other farm property , doing an immense
amount of damage. Its path varied in
width from ten rods to a mile. It
started near William Vantyle's farm
and continued until within a few miles
east of Gresham. From Vantyle's farm
to that of William Witte , a distance of
about five miles , the , damage , was confined -
fined to light buildings.and windmills ,
but on reaching Witte's place it completely -
pletely , wrecked his house and barn ,
together with the contents and machinery -
chinery , the family barely escaping
with their lives. 'Other houses and
outbuildings were badly wrecked.
WHILE bathing in the Blue river at
Beatrice , in company with a number
of other boys , Arthur , the 7-year-old
son of L. D. McGinnis , was drowned.
The river being high , the little fellow
had gone beyond his depth and was
floating down stream before his companions -
panions were aware that he was in
danger.
Duiusa the absence of the family at
church , the residence of S. IL Hunter ,
just west of Nebraska City , was burglarized -
glarized by three tramps and jewelry
to the amount of $300 was taken. The
burglary was soon discovered and a
search commenced for the thieves , who
were arrested and jailed.
- , . . ,
T - t is -l-Y -
SOUTHERN REPRESENTATION.
Republican National Convention Wilt
Bring a Fight.
Washington , June 8. At the Repub.
Bean rational convention in Minneap
oils in 1S92 a resolution was adopted Instructing -
structing the executive committee to
reduce , if In their judgment proper , the
representation from the South } n theh
national convention of 189u. The South
is now entitled to 204 votes out f a
total of 906 , and the northern .anu eastern -
ern Republicans want the southern influence -
fluence weakened , as that section does
nothing toward the election of a Republican -
publican , president. Senator Elkins of
West Virginia proposes to prevent } f
possible the reduction of southern representation -
resentation , and will call to his assistance -
ance Richard C Kerens of Missouri ,
who is a member of the executive com-
mittee. The members of the committee
from the southern states will be a unit
In opposition to the proposed change ,
and Mr. Kerens is expected to control
the members from the silver states of
the West and thus defeat the resolu-
tion.
SPANISH MINISTER PROTESTS.
Calls the Attention of Our Government
to Filibustering Expeditlonh
Washington , June 8.-Mr. De Lome ,
the Spanish minister to the United
States , has called the attention of the
state department to allegations , that
.filibustering expeditions against Spanish -
ish authority in Cuba are being fitted
out } n the bayous of the Lower Mississippi -
sippi river. He also says armed citizens -
zens of some of the southern states
often parade with arms , with a view
to joining some of these outgoing expeditions -
ditions , or at least to give active encouragement -
couragement to the Cuban Insurrec-
tionists. It Is believed at the department -
ment there is little truth in the reports
which reach here from the South of the
fitting out of warlike expeditions
against Cuba.
Spanish officials here are keeping
close watch on several supposed expeditionary -
ditionary movements for the purpose of
furnishing information on.which to request -
quest action by the United States gov-
ernment. One of the expeditions is believed -
lieved to have started from Philadel-
phia. The suspected ships , it is said ,
are the George Childs and Bridgeport.
The Spanish officials connect the movements -
ments of these ships with suspicious
operations at Dauphin and Cat Island ,
on the mouth of the Mississippi.
THREE MEN HANGED.
San Quentin Prlson , California , tL e
Scenq of a Triple Execution
San Francisco , Cal. , June 8.-Three
murderers were hanged this morning
at San Quentin. Five men were to have
been executed , but Gov. Budd respited
Fremont Smith and Rico Morasco. The
three men who suffered the death penalty -
alty are Patrick Collins , A. Milio Garcia -
cia and Anthony Azoff. Collins stabbed
his wife to death because she would no
longer supply him with liquor. A. Milio
Garcia is a Mexican. Last year near
Colton , San Bernardino county , he cut
the throat of an old Frenchman. The
purpose was robbery. Anthony Azoff
shot and killed Ben Harris , a Southern
Pacific detective. Azoff was a high-
wayman. He had robbed a railroad
station agent and the detective had
traced him to Boulder Creek , when Harris -
ris attempted to place him under arrest.
Azoff drew a revolver and shot him.
CONDITION OF KANSAS WHEAT
Southern and Western Portions of t teState
State Badly Damaged.
Wichita , Kan. , June 8.-Conservative
estimates of the probable wheat crop in
southern and western Kansas are : Cow-
ley County , one-fourth crop ; Sedgewick
County , one-half crop ; Sumner County ,
one-fourth crop ; Reno County , not to
exceed one-fourth of a crop. There will
be a good half crop in Harstro County.
In all the counties along the main line
of the Santa Fe west and in the counties
south of the main line there will be a
total failure of whet. In the territory
visited by the recent heavy rains the
wheat is filling out much better than
was anticipated. Taking Oklahoma and
the Indian Territory as a whole , there
will probably not be as much wheat
raised as was put in for seed. Corn in
southern Kansas is in splendid condition -
tion , and the prospects indicate the largest -
est crop for years.
BANKER CASSATT ARRESTED.
Falluro of the Pella National Bank Assuming -
suming a Serious Look.
' Des Moines , Iowa , June 8.-Ex-Sen-
ator E. R. Cassatt , until recently the
president of the First National Bank of
Pella , arrived here yesterday 'n the
Pock Island 'train with Jnited States
Marshal Gray. Investigation shows
that $60,000 of the bank's funds are missing -
ing much of it belonging to the poor
of the town. While it is generally
known that part of his dealings on the
board of trade was alleged to have been
done through a Des Moines bucket-shop ,
his later and larger deals were made in
Chicago. The amount of cash on hand
is $ S,000 , while the examiners report for
January showed the amount on hand to
be 40 per cent of the full amount. The
fact that the present cashier , J. H. Stu-
benruch , swore to the bank's being in a
solvent condition on March 5 and May
7 places him in a tieculiar pdsitlon.
Statue to Sir John Macdonald.
Montreal , Que. , June 8.-A great popular -
ular demonstration took place yesterday -
day at tunveiling of the Sir John
Macdonald statue. It was the fourth
anniversary of his death. Lord and
Lady Aberdeen and all the Dominion
ministers were out except Charles Hib-
bard Tupper. All the provincial ministers -
ters were represented dud all foreign
powers by their consuls. Lord Aberdeen -
deen unveiled the monument.
Traveling Men Adjourn.
San Antonio , Texas , June 8.-The las :
day's session of the National Travelers
Protective association was held yester-
day. John A. Lee of Missouri was elected -
ed president. Terre Haute was selected
as the meeting place of the next con-
ventlon. }
Samuel Gompers Better.
Little' Rock , Ark. , June 8.-Samuel
Gompers , the labor leader , who has
been confined to his hotel in this city
with gastritis , Is slightly nproved , and
his physician states that he is in no I-
mediate danger. .
. - - - - - ' - . a. . . , . , . ---v.
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A SHOCKING STORY.
SERIOUS CHARGES AGAINST
PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO.
Gustav Rowan , One of the Passengers
Itescued from the Steamer Colima ,
Says the I'eoplo on Board Were
I'raetically Murdered.
San Francisco , Cal. , June 10.-Gustav
Rowan , one of the survivors of the
Colima , has sent a communication to a
local paper in which he says :
"I want to make a statement. Some
of the survivors will not dare to tell
the truth as they have been promised
money to keep still. The Colima was
lost because she was badly handled by
officers without capacity and by bad
men when the gale struck us. When I
saw that the ship was going to sink I
went after the life preservers and commenced -
menced to give them out to the passen-
gers. The steward told me to let them
alone and ordered me forward. I was
saved because I got a life preserver
and if the others had been allowed to ,
get them , too , many would have been
saved with me.
"The passengers were kept penned up
until the last moment and then made to
go-down in the ocean like a pack of
dogs. If some of the passengers had
killed the steward who kept them from
getting safety it would have been
mercy to others. In spite of what
he told me I kept on giving out life preservers -
servers and by this saved some of the
people from death.
The Chronicle says that as a result
of the testimony given at the federal
inquiry into the cause of the Colima
disaster a number of suits for damages
will be brought against the Pacific
Mail steamship company.
FATAL FLOOD IN HUNGARY.
Is Feared the Town of Itoberdsdorf Is
Swept Away.
London , June 10.-A dispatch to the
Standard from Vienna gives additional
particulars of the flooding of Koberds-
dorf , the Hungarian summer resort. So
sudden was the rise of the freshet that
it was not realized until the bodies of
the dead peasantry , pieces of buildings
and furniture from the cottages came
floating into the lower part of the town.
One of the remarkable incidents of
the flood was related by some of the
persons who escaped to the mountains.
It was the story of the manner in which
a cradle containing a sleeping child was
forced down the gorges by the rushing
waters. The child was rescued with
difficulty by those } n the lower part of
the village. Owing to the damage to
the wires , it is impossible to ascertan
the exact loss of life , but it is feared
that the whole town has been destroyed.
It is , however , known that twelve
bodies of the inhabitants of this one
village have been recovered. '
Brazil Sues for Libel.
New York , Jnue 10.-A special cable
to the Herald from Buenos Ayres says :
"In refutation of stories which ex-
President Caceres of Peru has been
giving to the press , Gen. Pierola last
night wired La Preusa that no agreement -
ment existed between himself and the
Chilian government , and that all assertions -
sertions to the contrary were absolutely
false. Brazil has ordered her minister
here to prosecute the Petit Journal , a
French newspaper , for an alleged insulting -
sulting article about Brazil in connection -
tion with the French Guyana affair.
Two regiments have been sent to Rio
Grande do sul to re-enforce the frontier -
tier army. The Italian legation in Rio
Janeiro has sent in more claims for indemnity -
demnity of citizens , tortured during the
Last revolution.
Michigan flan Killed in Mexico.
Chihuahua , Mexico , June 10.-About
two weeks ago P. R. Flower and John
T. Benton , two wealthy young Americans -
cans from Michigan , arrived here and
left on an overland trip to Hermosilla ,
across the Sierra Madre mountains.
Advices have been received here that
Mr. Benton was killed three days ago
by falling over the side of a cliff. His
companion is on his way to Nogales ,
Arizona , with the body of the dead
man.
3ray Clash with Socialists.
Vienna , June 10.-It was intended that
the socialists' demonstration on Sunday -
day should be prohibited. Thousands
of workmen , however , have already decided -
cided to take part in the procession , and
it may be impossible to prevent a
demonstration. The police have orders
to do all in their power to stop the
meetings of the socialists , and , as the
officials have recently been reprimanded
fof ° undue leniency to those taking part
in these movements , serious trouble is
expected.
Tribesmen Attack British.
Calcutta , June 10.-Dispatches from
Simla say that the tribesmen of Chitral
are again threatening to attack the
British troops. A body of 500 tribesmen
is collected in the vicinity of Dargal
and the British are preparing for an
attack. Later dispatches from Simla
say that a body of Shirrannis has surprise -
prise l a village twenty miles from Fort
Sandeman , in the Zhob country , and
! tilled a British lieutenant and seven
nen.
Burglars Commit Murder for S00.
Milwaukee , June 10.-A special from
Oconto , Wis. , says Michael Baumgard-
was murdered last night by burglars.
Mrs. Baumgardner was aroused by her
husband's cries and saw him grapple
with two strangers , who escaped in a
carriage which was standing at the
door. The burglars secured about b90.
will Remain In Session.
London , June 10.-The rumors so persistently -
sistently circulated recently of the
probability of an early dissolution of
parliament are gradually dying out , as
the moving spirits of both the conservative -
ative and liberal parties admit that it
is to their interests to avoid a dissolution -
tion during the seascn.
Choice Lumber Burned.
Cloquet , Minn. , June 10. An Incendiary -
diary fire early this morning burned
15,000,000 feet of choice lumber in the
Cloquet Lumber Company's yard. Loss , I
$150,000 ; fully insured. '
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DATE OF NEW TARIFF LAW.
Chief JustIce Futter ! lotto That It
Vent Into Effect on tug. 28.
Washington , June 10.-Chief Justice
Fuller's opinion in the Burr and Hard-
wick case , involving the date when the
present tariff law went into effect ,
which was announced on Monday last ,
but not read , was made public to-day.
Discussing the contention that the law
should have taken effect on August 1
instead of on August 28 , 1533 , the Chief
Justice says.
Upon the threshold we are met with
the fact that the act of 1590 was not
repealed In terms until August 28 , 1594 ,
and that the repealing section of the
latter act kept in force every right and
liability of the government , or of every
person , which has been incurred or accrued -
crued prior to the passage thereof and
thereby every right or liability was excepted -
cepted out of the effect sought to be
given to the first section. The right of
the government to duties under the tariff -
iff law which existed between August
1 and August 28 was a right accruing
prior to the passage of the act. of 1894 ,
and the obligation of the importers between -
tween August 1 and August 28 to pay
the duties on their goods on the existing -
ing tariff law was a liability under that
law arising prior to the passage of the
law of 1S94 ; and if congress Intended
that section A should revert back to
August 1 , still the intention is quite as
apparent that the act of 1590 should remain -
main } n full force and effect until the
passage of the new act on August 28
and that all acts done , rights accrued
and liabilities incurred under the earlier -
lier act prior to the repeal should he
saved from the effect thereof as to all
parties interested , the United States In-
cluded.
"A higher rate was imposed on many
articles by the act of 1894 than by the
prior act , and a lower rate on others ,
while some that were free were made
dutiable , as , forr instance , the article of
sugar. Must duties paid between August -
gust 1 and August 28 be refunded where
the rate was lowered , and assessed
where the rate was raised , or a duty
imposed where none existed ? Clearly
not. "
Summing up , the Chief Justice says :
"As the act of 1890 was not repealed
by the act of 1894 until the latter act
became a law , when inconsistent laws
were declared thereby repealed , we
think it cannot be doubted that congress -
gress intended the rates of duty prescribed -
scribed by the act of 189.4 to be levied
on the first day of August , if the bill
should then be a law , and if not , then
as soon after that date as it should become -
come a law. On the first day of August
the duties prescribed by the first section -
tion of the act of 1894 could not be lawfully -
fully levied , and so far as the importations -
tions in this case are concerned and
others similarly situated , the law required -
quired exaction of the duties prescribed
by the act of 1590. As to such importations -
tions , the first section of the act of
1594 could not be literally carried out
unless by holding It to operate as a
clause , and this we consider altogether
indispensable. The language of section
1 was "that on and after August 1 there
be levied , " and of the second section ,
"that on and after August 1" certain
enume' ated articles shall be exempt
from duty. In our judgment the word
"shall" spoke forr the future and was
not intended to apply to transactions
completed when the act became a law. "
INDIANS WANT ALLOTMENT.
Omahas Anxious to Control Their Tribal
Lands Themselves.
Ponder , Neb. , June 10.-United States
Senator Allen held a council with the
Omaha Indians at the Omaha agency
to personally inform himself in regard
to the ccntroveri which is menacing
the peace of this county. The contention -
tion is in regard to the disposition of
their tribal lands , of which they have
about fifty thousand acres. A number
of Prominent Omaha Indians told the
senator that their people were unanimous -
mous in a desire for an immediate allotment -
lotment in order that they might handle
their tribal lands themselves. The subject -
ject of the five-year lease on a 2,000
acre tract of these lands to Contractor
Farley was then brought up , the Indians -
dians claiming the contract was inter-
ureted to them as a one-year lease.
To Discuss Currency Question.
Indianapolis , Ind. , June 10.-The executive -
ecutive committee of the Democratic
state editorial association yesterday issued -
sued a call for a meeting of the association -
ation at Maxinkuckee , June 27 and 28 ,
to discuss the currency question. This
step was taken after Chairman Taggart
of the state committee had finally declined -
clined to call a state convention to discuss -
cuss the subject. Democrats from all
parts of the state have been invited to
attend the meeting , and a lively session -
sion is looked for.
1 reacher Starved to Death ,
Guthrie , 0. T. , June 10.-Rev. John
P. Smith , a Baptist country preacher
ten days ago , has been found lying
dead along the roadside in an adjoining -
ing county. He had been in poor
health for a long time and stole some
meat to keep his wife and little children -
dren from starving , was arrested and
convicted of the theft , and sentenced
to five years in the penitentiary. Feeling -
ing his punishment too great , he broke
from jail and met death from exposure
and 'starvation.
Queen Victoria in Danger.
Edinburg , June 10.-The little town
of Ballater , near Balmoral , where the
queen is stopping , was startled late last
evening by the reckless firing of a re-
voh er in the streets. The young man
who fired the pistol was arrested , and
it was found that he had in his possession -
sion a paper addressed to Queen Victoria -
toria , whom he intended to visit. A
doctor who examined the young man
expressed the opinion that he was in-
sane.
Flocking Valley Mines Resume.
Columbus , Ohio , June 10.-Four small
mines are running in the Hocking Val-
ley. Next Monday eight are to resume.
One of these , the Monday mine , has an
output of 100 cars per day. All of the
mines in the valley are to resume at 51
cents.
Atchison Plan Effective.
New York , June 10.-The Atchison reorganization -
organization committee has declared
the plan of reorganization effective. The
securities deposited under the plan include -
clude F90,000,000 general 4's , F45,000,000
2's and 500,000 shares of the stack.
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WILL :10T ARM INDIA\S. .
x
Agent of the Omaha Reservation Denie > < .
a Startling Rumor. )
Pender , Neb. , June 6.-Ltttie Interest 1 )
' Is excited on the Omaha reservation by' ;
the report that the authorities at Wash- , ;
lngton have authorized the arming of
the Indian police to evict the settlers.
The report is not credited. Capt. Beck
has repeatedly asserted that he would
sot place loaded guns in the hands of
redskins and turn them loose to eject
the settlers. Beck demands that the ,
settlers cancel their leases with the
Flournoy Land company and lease 1
their farms direct from him. The settlers -
tlers have been paying rent from year ! .
to year to the Flournoy people , who
claim to have a long lease from the In-
dians. Beck has declared that the'
Flournoy company obtained their lease
from the Indians by fraud and that in
canceling it he is merely protecting the - .
interests of the Indians. There are- ,
only twenty regular Indian police , .
though Beck has authority to swear In 1
any or all of the 600 redskins on the
Omaha reservation. While there are
only 200 settlers on the reservation directly -
rectly involved the hundreds of farmers
In Thurston County are largely in symPathY - 1
PathY with them. The settlers have arranged -
ranged to apply to Judge Dundy of the.
Federal court at Omaha for an Injunction -
tion restraining Federal '
troops interfering -
fering i n the affairs of Thurston Coun- 1
ty. Gov. Holcomb will be appealed to '
to oppose Federal troops with militia , I '
and an interesting clash of State , Federal - 1
eral , judicial and municipal authority i' '
Is likely to be the result.
Archbishop Kenrlck Not Deposnd. . {
Rome , June 6.-It is said at the Vat-
lean the action taken by the pope does : I
not depose Archbishop Kenrick from
his present title or position , nor does. 1
it appoint Archbishop ICain as his sue-
cessor. It was made for the purpose' f
of assisting In the management and
administration of the church property - -
erty of the archdiocese. It does not in , ,
any way make Archbishop Kain the
successor of Archbishop Kenrick , but. t
gives him such strong powers as coadjutor -
adjutor that he will be able to carry
Oil the laborious work of managing the
church property and affairs as though.
he were archbishop in name or fact.
This will bring no deposition or removal - - ,
moval of the venerable head of the.
archdiocese. , )
Eminent Missionary Dead. , ; r
Winchester , Mass. , June 6.-The Rev. I
Henry Martin Scudder , D. D. , the eminent -
nent missionary and clergym-in , died ,
last evening from an attack of apop
lexy. IIc has been in poor health for , '
some time. He leaves a wife and three
l
children. '
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L1CE STOCK AND I'ItODUCE MARKETS. (
i
Quotations from New York , Chicatrti St.
Louis , Omaha and Elsewhere.
OMAHA (
Butter-Creamery separator. . 15 16
Luticr-1 air to good country. 12 fy l4 f
Ls--Fresh. , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U iG 1U
honey-I or lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 'A 15
IlenS-Live. nor 't . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 v 6.
Lemons-hoiee Messinas. . . . . 4 5) r' 5 0i I
Urir cs-Floridas , leer box. . . . 3 50 6t , 3 75
1 otatoes. . . 70 ( Or f0 '
hearts-Navy , hand-picked , bu 1 tO Q , 2 00
lity-Upland , per ton. . . . . . . . . . 7 50 ( 9 OJ 11
Unons-Itermnda per crate. . . 1 , A ( " . 1 I ; ' )
lu'rots- ; 1)1)1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 10 175
Cruuicrrries-Jerseys . . . . . . . .U :0 ut12 0)
Pieappks-per (1nr . . . . . . . . . . . . 17. ( h 2 00
hog-Mixed packing. . . . . . . . . . 4 0) ( C 4 f0
Io s-Heavyweights. 41' 454A
beevestcekers and feeders. :1 : 01) ( : t : ,
lied tcers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 0) @ 5 D ) '
hulls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 ( ii. : i 00
ttats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 ; ( D 3 i0
laves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L'S ) 46450 - '
_ ows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 ( s 4 20
ixeifers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : t 7. ; ( 4 20 e
1Fcstertrs. . : t io ' 5 00
tfeeu-Lambs. . : t 75 i. 5 00
tlecp-Clwice natives. . . . . . . . . 3 'S to 4 0J '
Cil ICAGO.
Wheat-No.2. spring. . . . . . . . . . . . 79 1 % . j
( crn-1'er iiu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5I' 52 1
tatser bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3t 3116
I'ork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 : 52 icl2 t.0
Laid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 U ; 616 0 67 '
L os-1'arkers ; and mixed. . . . . 4 :5 'y 4 i )
tattle-Steerscorn fcd. . . . . . . . 4 . , u 5 )0
beep-I amrs 5 00 ii 00
Cheep-Good to fancy. . 3 2,1 5 73
NLly YO1.E.
Wheat. No.2 , red ; Tinter. . . . . . . 80 ( SI y
cotu-No. : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ri J t,0if
Uats-No.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' 2
i Orr ; . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 ! 2 12 CO
Laru . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0(5 (
.
. LOUIS. ,
Wheat-No 2 red. cash. . . . . . . . . 2 , E8
_ crn-I'er iu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 'i9 47 %
Gas-1 er bu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2i 2Sa
L ogs-'tiixct i packing. . . . . . . . . . 4 t,0 tt. 4 50 ' 1
tattle--heel steers. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 50 ry 5 : ; 0
icer-iixci , natives.t f0 .n 4 10
Lambs. . . . . . . 3 )0 E4 4 75
hANaAa 1:11 i.
Wheat-No. 2hard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E ) u 8I
torn-No. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ) i. 51
Ott-o. 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 29z
l.attle-stockers and feeders. . 2 51) ; w 4 25
Logs-llixeu pacters. . . . . . . . . . 4 10 ( m 4 45
Affairs in Cuba.
Havana , June 6.-Bands of insurgents -
gents from the Province of Puerto
Principie have invaded the Province of
Santa Clara. Gen. Huque is concentrating -
ing his troops at Sancti Espiritus , north
of Trinidad , in the Province of Santa
Clara. Col. Rizo , with Maj. Armin-
ana , who has been in pursuit of insurgents -
surgents , has had an engagement with
the insurgents at Limonar. The insurgents -
gents left two dead and ter. saidled
horses on the field. Captain-General
Campos has arrived at SanctrEsplri-
tus. The insurgent band , commanded
by Maceo , has burned the village of
Sevilla , near the mines of Juruagua ,
Santiago de Cuba. .
Incendiary Fire at Huron. S. D.
Iluron , S. D. , June 6.-An incendiary
fire destroyed six buildings on Dakota
avenue. The most serious loss was G.
Laube's $1,000 collection of models of
patents , the greatest west of Wash-
ington. Total loss $20,000 with small
insurance.
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Japanese have Formosa. f (
Shanghai , June 6.-The formal transfer -
fer of the island of Formosa and the
Chinese property on that island to the
Japanese teas effected at Kee Lung'
Sunday , June 2 , when the documents
necessary to the transfer were made.
Loaded Down with Debt.
Washington , June 6.-A semi-ofHclal '
statement has been received here from '
the leaders of one of the most Influential -
tial elements in Cuba showing that
war expenditures are becoming so enormous -
mous and the sugar and tobacco industries - 4
dustries so unprofitable that they believe -
lieve a general uprising will result from
the hard times caused.
Deputies Put Down a Riot. '
Altoona , Pa. , June 6.-Deputies haute
to put down a riot among 300 striking i I
laborers on an impounding reservoir
five miles west of here yesterday. Mores
trouble Is feared.