The monitor. (Omaha, Neb.) 1915-1928, December 30, 1927, Page THREE, Image 3

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    PERSONALS
Ed. P. Morearty, Lawyn. TOO Pa
ten Trait Building, JJmtmon MM or
Harniy Mi
A Miss Madeline Shipman went to
Kansas City, Mo,, Monday night to
R spend a few days with her sister
f : Thelma, who is taking the nurse
training course at the Wheatley Prov
ident hospital there.
Mr. and Mrs. John A. Smith and
daughter Celestine, left for Kansas
City, Mo., Saturday to spend Christ
mas with friends.
Mr. and Mrs. George Green of
Sleepy Eye, Minn., were the house
guests of Mrs. Otis Shipman, 2724
No. Thirtieth street, for the holidays.
FOR RENT—Two modern furnished
rooms, $2.50 to $3.60 with kitchen
privileges. Webster 1529.
A. P. SCRUGGS, Lawyer. Large ra
pe ne nee. Handle! all law raieii
2310 North Twenty-second itreet.
WEbiter 4162.
Miss Corinne Ferguson came up
from Lincoln, Nebr., Wednesday and
is the house guest at the home of
Miss Madeline Shipman.
Mrs. Hattie P. Smith entertained
a large number of young people at a
dancing party Tuesday evening at
her home, 2872 Binney street, in
honor of the birthday anniversary of
her daughter Marie. Many lovely
presents were presented to Marie and
a very enjoyable time was had by all
attending the party.
New Year Ball at Dreamland Hall,
New Yea r’s night, January 1. Dance
from 10 to ?
New Year Ball at Dreamland Hall,
Year’s night, January 1. Dance from
10 to ?
Mr. Richard Simpson died Friday
night after a long and painful illness,
at his residence, 2878 Corby street.
He was born in Bermuda where his
mother and other relatives still re
side. He had been a resident of
Omaha for 18 years. He was buried
from St. John’s A. M. E. church Tues
day afternoon, the Rev J. H. Grant
officiating, assisted by the Rev. Mr.
Burckhardt and the Rev. C. H.
Trusty. Interment was at Forest
Lawn.
Frank, Henry and Ernest Matthews
of Missouri Valley, la., were holiday
visitors in Omaha the past week.
New Year Ball at Dreamland Hall,
New Year’s night, January 1. Dance
from 10 until ?
Dr. Craig Morris returned from St.
Paul, Minn., Sunday night, where he
was called last week by the serious
illness of his father, David Morris.
Dr. and Mrs. R. B. D. Dobson and
small son, Robert, jr., of Sioux City,
la., who arrived Sunday morning
and were the house guests of Dr. and
Mrs. W. W. Peebles for Christmas,
left for their home Tuesday after
noon.
The Carter Charity and Benevolent
club held a Christmas tree at the res
idence of Mrs. Ardena Watson, 2718
No. Twenty-eighth avenue., Friday,
December 23. Sixty-five children
were made happy by the gifts re
ceived.
Mrs. Lucille Henderson entertain
ed a number of young people at a
dancing party at her home, 2614
Blondo street, Saturday evening for
her daughter Eula. Forty guests
were present and spent a very pleas
ant evening.
“There may be a wrong way to do
right, but there is no right way to do
wrong.”
Y. W. C. A. NOTES
The public is cordially invited to
attend the New Year vesper service
at the North Side Branch of the Y.
W. C. A., Twenty-second and Grant
street, Sunday, January 8, at 4 p. m.
The subject “What the New Year
Means to Me," will be generally dis
cussed by all for the space of three
minutes each. The following pro
gram will be rendered:
Devotion, by Mrs. J. D. Thornton;
Piano selection, by Mrs. Jennie N.
Moore of Council Bluffs; Reading,
“Man’s Likeness to God,” by Mrs.
Lillian Frieson; Whistling solo, “In
the Garden,” by Mrs. H. J. Kinney;
Piano selection, by Miss Ellen Rich
ardson; Solo, “I Never Knew How
Much God Gave Me,” by Miss Hazel
Stewart; Piano solo, by Miss Marjory
Dallas; Vocal duett, Mesdames Ruth
Johnson and Hazel Roulette.
Tea will be served during the social
hour to everyone who attends. Mrs.
Hiram Greenfield is chairman of the
religious and general education com
mittee.
The ministers and their wives of
the city, held their first annual ban
quet December 26, at the North Side
Branch of the “Y.” During the
course of dinner, a very interesting
program was rendered by the wives
of the ministers. We hope that they
will make it an annual affair at our
branch.
After a vacation of two weeks, the
night school pupils and all others who
care to come in, will come together
again, Monday evening, January 2,
for reopening. The usual subjects
will be taught this semester.
There are still openings in the
public speaking class for a few
more. This class is a very worth
while investment, and is very prac
tical in its scope. Register NOW!
The annual party given during the
holiday season for the childien of the
city, was held Tuesday afternoon, at
the branch. There were about forty
children present. After the games
were played, refreshments were
served and all went home rejoicing.
MINISTERIAL ALLIANCE
ENTERTAIN WIVES AT
CHRISTMAS DINNER
_
The Ministerial Alliance launched
what it is hoped will be an annual
affair Monday afternoon at the North
Side Y. W. C. A., when they enter
tained their wives at a dinner. About
25 persons were in attendance.
The idea was suggested by the Rev.
Mr. Brewer, pastor of Allen chapel,
of the South Side, at a recent meet
ing of the alliance, that he thought it
would make for good fellowship and
acquaintanceship, if an annual din
ner for the ministers and their wives
could be held some time during the
week of Christmas. The idea was
readily adopted and a committee, con
sisting of the Rev. Messrs. Brewer,
Trusty, and Hamlett, was appointed
to arrange for the dinner and to in
terest as many ministers as possible.
The committee arranged for the din
ner at the “Y” and it was served by
the health-education committee. It
was some dinner! Turkey and all the
fixings.
After doing justice to the dinner
an interesting program of brief ad
dresses and music was given. The
Rev. John Albert Williams was select
ed to serve as toastmaster.
Among the numbers was a humor
ous reading by Mrs. Brewer; a brief
paper by Mrs. Fort; short talks by
Mrs. E. H. McDonald, Mrs. McGee,
Mrs. Williams, Mrs. Trusty, all of
whom were models for their husbands
in brevity of speech, but whether
their reverend spouses will take the
hint and profit by the example set
in their sermons and speeches here
after, is open to question. Some did
not profit by the example when they
in turn were called upon by the toast
master to speak their speech. Among
the men called on were the Rev
Messrs. Burckhardt, Grant, Trusty,
Story, McDonald, Fort and Brewer.
While each speech was good, some
short, some longer, the best speech
by the men, in the judgment of most,
was that by Rev. E. H. McDonald,
and the best story was by Rev. Mr.
Brewer. Musical numbers were con
tributed by Miss Frances Trusty and
by Miss Lucy May Stamms. The
benediction was pronounced by the
Rev. L. M. Hamlett.
It was voted by all present a very
delightful affair, and heralded as
marking a new epoch among the min
isterial forces of our race in the city.
FOR RENT—Two rooms, neatly fur
nished, strictly modern. Private
kitchen and bath. The new James
Apartments. Call at 2221 North
Twenty-fifth street. Web. 3634.
BEAUTIFUL STYLE SHOW
HELD AT DREAMLAND HALL
Dreamland hall was the scene of a
very artistic and beautiful style show
last Thursday evening, given by Mr.
John A. Smith. These are always
gala occasions. Models promenaded
up and down an artistically decorated
raised aisle in the center of the hall,
to the strains of the Nite Owls’ or
chestra, displaying negligees, sport
and street attire, afternoon and even
ing gowns, wraps and furs. Follow
ing the revue dancing was indulged
in by the large number of people
present.
TINKHAM ADDRESS TO
N. A. A. C. P. WILL SOUND
POLITICAL KEYNOTE
New York, N. Y.—The address to
be delivered on January 8, by Repre
sentative George Holden Tinkham of
Massachusetts before the annual
meeting of the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored Peo
pie, will sound a political keynote vi
tal to the Negro’s immediate future
in the United States, according to
James Weldon Johnson, secretary of
the association.
“Mr. Tinkham has raised in con
gress the issue of the Negro’s vote,” I
said Mr. Johnson, “and of Southern
representation. He has based this is
sue squarely upon the fourteenth
amendment and he contends that the
Negro must be permitted to vote on
the same conditions as all other citi
zens or Southern representation in
congress must be reduced in accord
ance with the provisions of the four
teenth amendment.
“Mr. Tinkham has long been cham
pioning this measure but never be
fore has the time been so opportune
for pushing it. The South is today
clamoring for the complete enforce
ment of the eighteenth amendment,
while it ignores and nullifies the
fourteenth and fifteenth amend
ments.
“Great sections of the East and
West are pointing out this inconsis
tency of the South, and stating that
if the eighteenth amendment is to be
enforced upon them, there is no good
reason why the fourteenth and fif
teenth amendments should not be en
forced throughout the South. The
Southern leaders and politicians are
thereby placed in a very embarrass
ing position which they have them
selves brought about.
“The N. A. A. C. P. feels it is
extremely fortunate in being able to
offer Mr. Tinkham its rostrum to
place his views and this issue before
the citizens of New York and the
country.”
MRS. M. O. BOUSFIELD NAMED
CHICAG6 SCHOOL PRINCIPAL
Chicago, 111.—Mrs. Maude B.
Bousfield, wife of Dr. Midian 0.
Bousfield, received notice recently of
her appointment as principal of the
Keith school, Thirty-fourth and Dear
born. Mrs. Bousfield has been hold
ing the position of dean of girls at
Wendell Phillips high school. She is
to assume her new duties after the
holidays.
GUNMAN GETS CHAIR;
EMPLOYER GETS 5 YEARS
La Grange, Tex., Dec. 30—When
his employer as a gunman finally
broke down and confessed that she
paid Pete Banks, Negro, a sum of
money to slay her husband, C. P.
Jones, Southern Pacific agent, he
was sentenced to death in the elec
tric chair. Mrs. Ella Jones testified
that she hired Banks to commit the
crime.
A fifty-five year sentence imposed
on Mrs. Jones, was reduced to five
by a former governor of Texas. Citi
zens of La Grange think that an ef
fort should be made to commute
Banks’ sentence to life imprisonment.
Leading and influential white citizens
think that the Negro was unduly in
fluenced by the white woman to com
mit the crime and have taken steps
to have the condemned man’s sen
tence commuted to life imprisonment.
Y Y
•j* Stand—WE. 6406 Res.—JA. 4S86 f
Y —24 Hour Service— J*
X 5
| LINCOLN TAXI f
Funeral and Wedding Service
$1 LEROY CHILDS, Prop. |
Stand at PEAT’S CAFE
Y Y
Y 24th and Clark St. Y
x Y
Y Give Us a Trial! Y
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^V’MWMW.eWMWseWaaWtfWM'M****!,
j WE. 0500 j
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i CITY MESSENGER and f
£ EXPRESS COMPANY |
% 2208 No. 24th St. ?
Y Y
L FRED DAVIS, Prop.
•J* Let us go your errand and deliver *j’
your CHRISTMAS packages. *|.
^"X"X“:"X"!"X”X“X“X"X"X"X"X"!
*X“X*A’X~X"X*,X**X**X*,X~X,A,X“X'
Y Open from 2 p. m. until 2 a. m.
* KING YUEN
I CAFE |
CHOP SUEY
and A
YETCAMEIN |
our hobby A
20101/2 No. 24th St. f
WE. 0401 OMAHA |
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I. .. »»»»»»*»*»] ,
[-> For LOWER PRICES -
: FURNITURE !i
< >
JI Rugs and Draperies J \
i: With CREDIT
< > and the smallest monthly < >
, , payments see i [
HARTMAN’S |
:: 413-15-17 So. 16th St.
| EMERSON’S LAUNDRY |
•j* The Laundry That Suite All *<*
| 1301 No. 24th St. Web. 0820 X
■X**!**X**Xm'-I-X‘v*X**X-*X-X..X-X-*X'
| RACE GROCERY |
X 2754 Lake Street X
x y
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V Fresh Line of Goods
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4. Groceries and Meats 4*
4. ♦
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*j* Open Saturday until 10 p. m. ]j*
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X JAS. COLQUITH, Prop. X
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,**,«**«***H»*******4«*4»*****!*4****M4*4*M»M***«***'*4H***MM*M«**4*‘
Reid-Duffy ;;
PHARMACY
FREE DELIVERY i;
^ Phone Web. 0609
| 24th and Lake Streets
v and 24th and Cuming !!
| OMAHA, NEB. ;j
| HOTEL CUMING
X 1916 Cuming Street
£ Rooms by day — 50c, 75c, $1.00
4* By the week — $2.00 to $4.00
? -
X UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
| —
.|. Mrs. Mayme Mason
X D. G. Russell, Prop. — Omaha
| Phone JA. 2466 $
I. Levy
; | DRUGGIST <;
PRESCRIPTIONS
i: Our i:
I SPECIALTY ::
*> 24th and Decatur Sta. <;
| WEbater 5802 i ’
J. A. GARDNER’S TRANSFER. Bag
gage, express, moving, light ant
heavy hauling. Reliable and com
petent. Six years in Omaha. 2622
Maple Street. Phone WEbster 4120.
Harry Broun, Express and Transfer.
Trunks and Baggage checked. Try as fee
your moving and hauling. Alan, coal md
ice for sale at all times. Phone Webstar
2973. 2013 Grace street.
; N. W. WARE
- ATTORNEY AT LAW ;j
::
4 » < *
3 3 1208 Dodge Street, Omaha, Nebraska ;;
I! Phones Webster 6613-Atlantic 8192. 33
.
■ • ■ >
3 3
4 .H . ♦ . ♦ » •
4 ► « ►
;; Let U5 figure your repair or lumber bill. Re-screen, re- ; ;
3; roof or re-paint, or anything in the repairing line. Let ;;
4 » 4 ►
3 3 us figure on your storm windows. See us about our 3 3
3; ready-built garages with our sectional reinforced con- ;;
;; crete foundation. 3;
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3 3 H. GROSS LUMBER & WRECKING CO. 3 3
< • <i
4 4 4 »
* * 2102 Nicholas Street WEbster 2234 * *
4 ' 4 I
4 ► 4 ►
< Ct O'# ClC0dCl#C#C"lllttl* C C * * p p r ^«; -f It f 0 I M # +
Read the Messages of Our
Advertisers
1 REMEMBER, the prices at the Neighborhood %
Stores are the same during the Holidays as B
they are during the remainder of the year. ft
SELECT YOUR GIFTS AT |
Thull Pharmacy
I 24th md Seward Streets WEbster 2000
era
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^lyeT^TuneranTom^l
2416 North 22nd St. Phone Web. 0248
A Modern Funeral Home
Endeavoring at all times to meet the
demand economically as well
as scientifically
W. L. Myers
Mortician