The monitor. (Omaha, Neb.) 1915-1928, December 23, 1927, Page FOUR, Image 4

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    TINKHAM OF MASSACHUSETTS
TO ADDRESS N. A. A. C. P.
ANNUAL MEETING
- I
Champion of Congress Reapportion
ment to Speak in New York,
January 8
New York, N. Y.—Congressman
George Holden Tinkham, representa
tive from the Eleventh Massachusetts
District in the House of Representa
tives, and champion of a bill to re-1
apportion Southern representation in
Congress because of the disfranchise
men of the Negro, will address the
annual meeting here of the National
Association for the Advancement of {
Colored People in the Mother A. M.
E. Zion church on Sunday afternoon,
.January 8.
Representative linkham, in accept
ing the N. A. A. C. P. invitation to
speak, stated that he would not ac-1
cept a penny of reimbursement for i
his expenses in coming to New York.
Mr. Tinkham has been known in
the House of Representatives in the '
past few sessions for his persistent
attacks upon the disfranchisement of
the colored citizens of Southern
states. In several congresses Mr.
Tinkham has introduced a bill call
ing for a report from the committee
of the census, which would be used
in reducing the representation of the
Southern states in congress, in ac
cordance with the provisions of the
United States Constitution. In the
present congress Mr. Tinkham has
introduced a resolution “for the in
vestigation of the notorious and gross
disfranchisement existing in the
United States and for the enforce
ment of the mandatory fourteenth
amendment of the Constitution of
the United States.”
The investigation is proposed as a
“preliminary step to the census to be
undertaken in 1930,” Mr. Tinkham
having stated in plain words that
“honest and constitutional govern- j
ment in the United States does not j
today exist.” Mr. Tinkham has laid
the blame not only on the Southern
Democrats but on Republican leaders,
saying: “The Republican leaders of
the House of 'Representatives joining
with the representatives from the in
surrectionary slave states of the
South are responsible. The great cit
ies of the north and west, whose
population during the last 18 years
has vastly increased, are now not law
fully, fairly and proportionately rep
resented constitutionally and does not i
fairiy represent the American people I
and American sentiments.” Of the ;
southern states, Mr. Tinkham says:
“As the Negro population is more I
than one-third of these states, each
white person in these states has at
least one-third more political power
than each white person in the other
states .... That the Negro is de- (
nied the vote in these states is not
only admitted, but is a matter of
common knowledge nationally and
internationally. Negro dis
franchisement is more of a fraud up
on the whole country than it is upon
the Negro .... Shall fraudulent
majorities in southern states elect the
president and control the congress by
violation of the Constitution and its
nullification?”
Representative Tinkham is a grad
uate of the Harvard college and law
school, has been a member of the
Boston Common Council and Massa
chusetts legislature, and since 1915
has represented Massachusetts in the
House of Representatives. He is a
member of the Society of Mayflower
Descendants and was the first Amer
ican to fire a shot agains. the Aus
trians after the United States had de
clared war in 1917.
Miss Consuela Cross, a student at
the University of Omaha, left Friday
night for her home in Kansas City,
Mo., to spend the holidays with her
parents.
M iss Ruth Collins leaves tonight,
accompanied by her brother, E. E.
Collins, to spend Christmas with her
parents at Shenandoah, la.
COLORED GIRL TO FLY
Los Angeles, Cal.—Miss LaVera
White, 18-year-old school girl, has
enrolled in the aviation class of 25
men beginning under the tuition of
Ace Foreman, who last spring at
tempted a flight to New York.
The girl has always had a craving
to fly. She believes she can fill the
place in the world of aviation for
merly filled by Bessie Coleman.
ROCKEFELLER JUNIOR
GIVES $25,000 FOR
AT' CAN Y. M. C. A.
New York City—A gift of $25,000
by John D. Rockefeller, jr.p for the
erection of a Y. M. C. A. center in
South Africa for the native Negro
population was made public here re
cently.
Mr. Rockefeller has for some time
been interested in the work of the
Y. M. C. A. in South Africa and his
gift toward the erection of a build
ing was made after careful study and
investigation. Concerning the work
in Africa, he declared:
“This work has now reached a
stage which justified considering the
erection of a headquarters building to
serve as a center for the training of
Negro leaders for service of the na
tive population.”
DETROIT READY TO
WELCOME FRATERNITY
Detroit, Mich.—Detroit is prepar
ing to receive the hundreds of mem
bers of the Kappa Alpha Psi frater
nity, who are expected to attend the
seventeenth annual convention of the
organization here December 26 to
December 30. Many elaborate social
functions have been planned in the
program of the meeting.
COLORED MASTER BARBERS
BOBBED HAIR
By R. C. Price
Of two evils, naturally it is always
better to choose the lesser. As be
tween having no hair at all on one’s
head, and wearing hair that has been
legitimately purchased, possibly the
latter course is the more esthetic.
I must emphatically insist, how
ever, that it is not the most hygenic.
The piling of false hair and other ar
tificial aids to pulchritude upon the
scalp that is already handicapped still
further inhibits its chances for any
thing like normal activity.
If a woman’s hair is short and
scanty, it is far better for her to wear
it cut short and to endeavor to stim
ulate an increased growth by giving
attention to the scalp, rather than to
wear false hair, or locks which only
heat and sweat the head, and which
by their own weight drag upon the
feeble hair they are designed to for
tify.
Of late years there has developed
a cult which believes in bobbed hair,
a fashion, if I remember rightly, that
was made popular by Irene Castle,
the famous danseuse. This is prob
ably an adaptation of the old Dutch
cut, used from earliest times to keep
the tangled tresses of children from
still further tangling.
This style of hair dressing is sen
sible, hygenic, and exceedingly at
tractive with most types of women,
ar.d I can heartily recommend it as
evidence of sound common sense.
It is one of the many things that
go to prove that the world is becom
ing saner and more intelligent in its
dealings with all matters that have
to do with physical welfare.
FLOYD SHACKLEFORD MAY
APPEAR HERE IN POWERFUL
DRAMA, "BABYLON”
“Babylon,” the drama of satire by
John Stevens McGroarty, staged at
the San Gabriel Mission playhouse,
Monday, October 17, for an indefin
ite run with matinees every Thursday
and Friday afternoon, played to a
packed house every night. The play
ers, though hampered by the ma
terial given them, ranged from the
essentially amateurish to the capable.
First honors might well go to Fred
Shackleford, who played the dumb
slave, “Pekah.” He was vital and
mighty to look upon, he did a bit of
pantomime well and he voiced no
lines. His silence was a benediction.
Here is the story of Babylon, an
ancient city of 500 B. C. done on a
modern note with characters speak
ing in slang and satirizing “we mod
erns.” The play is quite entertaining
and is staged effectively, with Fred
Shackleford the only Negro actor
and formerly an Omaha boy, one of
the twin sons of Mr. and Mrs. William
Shackleford, 2115 Ohio street, giving
interesting and powerful perform
ances.
The action of the play, “The Gar
den of Bazuzu” in Babylon in the
year 500 B. C. with the characters,
“Bazuzu,” a get rich quick promoter;
Rimmon, a scribe; Rasuh, a young
gentleman of Nineveh; Horus, a
friend of Bazuzu; Rikhi, a mail car
rier; Daniel, a Hebrew prophet; Pe
kah, an Ethiopian slave, played by
Floyd Shackleford; Zebini, a chate
laine; Okhabata, secretary to Bazu
zu; Nine, the cooing dove; Ziria, Ba
ba, Naba, Cirbela, singing girls to
Belshazzar; Tasrammath, the king’s
dance, with Teumar, Assura, Susiana,
Elama, the dancing girls of the pal
ace, ar 1 Ansch, the chief musician;
Hapi, Hatshep, and Seta are slaves
of Nin. Thus you can picture the
great play, which is directed by Serge
Cukrainsky in ballet, Salvador Nuno
in songs, Edward Sterling, stage di
rector, and Ida L. McGroarty, techni
cal directress.
this news comes direct trom Moyd
Shackleford, sending clippings from
the Los Angeles and San Diego pa
pers, and the entire program of the
play, special to The Monitor, so his
many interested friends and school
mates may know of his progress. He
also sends a letter to his parents and
all Omaha friends. “Babylon” will
probably come to Omaha in the near
future.
»..«. .«..*■ .». .«. • •
rVWWWWWWWWWWWW^rV^
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Web. 5837 Web. 2801
Shop Residence
MADAM
C. J. WALKER
BEAUTY SHOP
Permanent Waving
Marcell Waving
Facial Massage
Packs, Bleaching and Manicure
Bobbing a Specialty
Parlor
2426 Lake St.
| HERMAN’S
£ Groceries and Meats
| Quality
y and
X Service x
|| 2418 No. 24th St. f
4 WEBSTER 6915
V
Louise Rice, world famous graphologist, I
can positively read your talents, virtues
and faults in the drawings, words and
what nots that you scribble when “lost
in thought”.
Send your “ scribblings ” or signature
for analysis. Enclose the picture of the Mikado
head, cut from a box of Mikado pencils, and
ten cents. Address Louise Rice, care of
EAGLE PENCIL CO.. NEW YORK CITY
I I
i
« s Phone ATI antic 9344 £
* * Rea. Phone WEbater 2734 y
I HARRY LELAND I
REAL ESTATE
< > t
] ’ Insurance Stocks Bonds £
< • Room 19, Patterson Block |
| <. Omaha, Nebraska «|.
NORTH 24th SHOE
HOSPITAL
24th and DECATUR ST.
SAM POMIDOR, Prop.
Phone WE. 4240
Qhristmas (greetings
H. DOLGOFF
Furniture 8C Hardware
1822-1824 No. 24tR St.
Phone Webster 1607
For real "Down Home” Cooking
Eat at
"LA FRANCE” CAFE
Fresh Vegetables the Year 'Round
— W here —
"SERVICE IS SUPREME"
2526 LAKE ST.
Web. 6079 or Web. 4450
MRS. JENNIE GRIFFIN. Prop.
The LINCOLN
MARKET
Wishes Its Patrons
and Friends
oA rWlerry Qhristmas
orfccept Our ‘BeH Wishes
for
<±A -Merry Qhristmas
and a
Floppy T^ew Tear
Your Grocer
N. SLOBODISKY
20th and PAUL Sts.
Webster 5299
C. H. HALL, stand, 1403 No. 24th
Baggage and express hauilng to a!
parts of the city. Phones, stand
W E. 7100; Res.. WE. 1056.
BEAUTY PARLORS
MADAM Z. C. SNOWDEN. Scientific
scalp treatment. Hair dressing and
manufacturing. 1154 No. '20th St
WEbster 6194
UNDERTAKERS
JONES & COMPANY, Undertaker*
24th and Grant Sts. WEbster 110(1
Satisfactory service always.
PAINTERS AND
PAPER HANGERS
A. F. PEOPLES. Painting and decor
ating, wall paper and glass. Plas
tering, cement and general work.
Sherwin-Williams paints. 2419
Lake St. Phone Webster 6366.
LAWYERS
W B. BRYANT, Attorney and Coun
»elor-at-Law. Practices in al
courts. Suite 19, Patterson Block
17th and Farnam Sts. AT. 934
or Ken. 4072.
H. J. PINKETT, Attorney and Ceun
seler-at-Iew. Twenty years' ex
perience. Practices in all courts
Suite 19, Patterson Block. 17th and
Farnams Sts. AT. 9344 or WE. 3180
"HOTELS
PATTON HOTEL, 1014, 1016, 1016
South 11th St. Known from coast
to coast. Terms reasonable. N. P
Patton, proprietor.
THE HOTEL CUMMINGS, 1916 Cum
ing St. Under new management
Terms reasonable. D. G. Russell
proprietor.
DRUG STORES
ROSS DRUG STORE, 2308 North 24t>
Street. Two phones, WEbster 2770
and 2771. Well equipped to supply
your needs. Prompt service.
THE PEOPLES’ DRUG STORE, 24tb
and Erskine Streets. We carry s
full line. Prescriptions promptly
filled. WEbster 8328.
LINCOLN MARKET
is still drawing crowds. There is a
reason. Groceries and meats which
please.
1406 No. 24th. Web. 1411
Classified
FOR RENT—Furnished room in
strictly modern home. One block
from Dodge carline. Call during
business hours, WE, 7126, even
ings, WE. 2480. tf-12-10-26.
FOR RENT—Neatly furnished room.
Modern home. With kitchen priv
ilege. Call Web. 6498. —tf.
FOR RENT—Furnished rooms. Web
ster 2180. 2516 Patrick avenue.
FOR RENT—Three room apartment,
partly modern. Kenwood 2093.
2213 Grace Street.
FOR RENT—Six rooms, 1148 North
20th street; five rooms, 1162Vs
North 20th. Modern except heat.
Webster 6299.
FOR RENT—Furnished room in mod
ern home, with kitchen privileges.
Man and wife preferred. Call WE.
0919 mornings.
FOR RENT—Furnished rooms, 22nd
and Grant. Webster 0257.
NICELY furnished rooms. All mod
ern. WE. 3960.'
FOR RENT—Nearly furnished room
in modern home, kitchen privileges.
WE. 3308. 4-T.
FOR RENT—Nearly furnished rooms.
Strictly modern Kitchen privi
leges. Harney car line. Web. 6613.
FOR RENT—Front room and kitch
enette. Web. 5188. 1204 North
Twenty-fifth street.
FOR RENT—One three-room apart
ment. Neatly furnished. Webster
6018. 2514 N. 31st street.
FOR RENT — Furnished apartment
or furnished room in strictly mod
ern home. Webster 4162. 2310
North Twenty-Second Street.
FOR RENT—Furnished or unfurnish
ed rooms. Near carline. Reason
able. WEbster 1053.
FOR RENT — Homelike furnishbd
rooms. 919 North 26th street.
Tel. Harney 1904.
FOR RENT—Two rooms, furnished
or unfurnished. Heat. Electric
light. Web. 7089.
FOR RENT — Furnished rooms in
modern home, steam heat, on two
car lines. Mrs. Anna Banks, 924
North Twentieth street. Jackson
4379.
FOR RENT — Light housekeeping
rooms. Web. 1825. 2029 Seward
FOR RENT — Furnished rooms in
modern home. 2211 Miami street.
Tel. Web. 2910.
SHOE REPAIRING
BENJAMIN & THOMAS always give
satisfaction. Best material, reason
able prices. All work guaranteed.
1415 North 24th St., Webster 5084
H. J. PINKETT, Attorney
Notice By Publication on Petition
for Settlement of Final Adminis
tration Account.
In the County Court of Douglas
County, Nebraska.
In the matter of the Estate of Ola
Roulette, Deceased.
All persons interested in said mat
ter are hereby notified that on the
23rd day of November, 1927, Eva J.
Roulette filed a petition in said
County Court, praying that her final
administration account filed herein
be settled and allowed, and that she
be discharged from her trust as ad
ministratrix and that a hearing will
be had on said petition before said
Court on the 17th day day of Decem
ber, 1927, and that if you fail to ap
pear before said Court on the said
17th day of December, 1927, at 9:00
o’clock A. M., and contest said peti
tion, the Court may grant the prayer
of said petition, enter a decree of
heirship, and make such other and .
further orders, allowances and de
crees, as to this Cou/! may seem
proper, to the end that all matters
pertaining to said estate may bo
finally settled and determined.
BRYCE CRAWFORD,
2t-12-2-27 County Judge.
ED. F. MOREARTY
Attorney-at-Law
NOTICE OF SERVICE BY
PUBLICATION
To EUGENE PAYNE, non-resident
defendant:
You are hereby notified that on
the 2nd day of September, 1927,
your wife, IOLA PAYNE, filed her
petition in the District Court of
Douglas County, Nebraska, the ob
ject and purpose of which is to ob
tain an absolute decree of divorce
from you on the grounds of cruelty,
non-support and desertion.
You are required to answer said
petition on or before January 9, 1928,
or her petition will be granted.
4t-12-9-27 IOLA PAYNE.