The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, September 06, 1947, Image 8

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1 C MON-CUT IT OUT//# I. WAIT A MINUTE, BREEZY/J /.WORK ALL TUEnm..]
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JIM STEELE By MELY.IN T A PL E Y
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"Next Door” ®y ted shearer
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“Sorry Folks, jus’ came in for the everiing paper!”
£CPORTS
\ OUT OF THE>
ADAM HAT
| V ANOTHER Of JIMMVS
, FEATS WAS TRIMMWO
i THE CUBS 4 STRMSHT
tin CHICAGO'S 1936
POST-SEASON SERIES. ,
h - r
N A GREAT 3R0
Baseman he ;■
n.AYEo every
position But
catcher In
HIS YERSATIttt
CAREER.
Jimmy
IGJykes
Performed a
minor miracle .
AFTER BE IN®, APPOINTED
manager of the l^t
Place Chicago white
SOX' IN 1934- HE BROUGHT
jhem UP to 3rd Place in
^ SEASONS, THE HIGHEST
[_THEyC> FINISHED SINCE 1920,
F HE WAS A SREAT TALKER pc*
I THE FIELD AS well AS-he USED «
f TQ BE INI SUCH DE'tAND AS An actk*
Dinner he wa*>\pwh;
A5'THE 0»*H"ONT oratdr.*
★ SAY YOU SAW IT IN THB GREATER GUIDE
Patronize Our
Advertisers
^OMTiwGNlAfc
F6AJVg&f
* '/fey
1 . . -J /
Why bo embarrassed ]yy invasions of little uninvited guests?
The solution to your problem, is: Don’t dodge tdiness!”
TAN TOPICS iHP By CHARLES ALLEN j
r"11 ■ .........i !
I '' * ' ' ~ r=&MU3 |.
“That’s my side of the story, now I’ll tell you his-”
• FOR GREATER COVERAGE —Advertise in
THE GREATER OMAHA GUIDE1
" " - - i
actors win out on
ANTI.JIM.CROW CLAUSE
NEW YORK — The League of
New York Theaeers has signed a
new contract with Actors Equity
Association-AFL granting the un
Lon’s demand that no actor be re
quired to perform at the National
Theater in Washington, D. C., af
ter August 1, if the theater con
tinues to bar Negroes,
Granting of this demand had
been urged upon the Theater Lea
gue's board of governors by Rev. |
Donald Harrington, national 1
chairman of the Workers Defen
se League. He acted at the re
quest of the union when the thea.
ter league appeared split on whe
ther to agree to such a provision.
Still ahead is the struggle to
end the bar on Negroes at the Na
tional Theater. Marcus Heiman,
head of the theater, said that he
would transform it into a movie
house rather than admit Negroes.
Meat Packing Industry
The atart of commercial meat
packing in North America can be
traced to 1641 when a square-rigged
ship sailed from Boston harbor with
a cargo which a handful of New
England colonists hoped could' be
sold to West Indies plantation own
ers. Capt. John Pynchen, Spring
field, Mass., and a few farmer neigh
bors had consigned hogsheads of
beef and pork, packed in salt, te
England’s colonies.
Eye Girl’s Warm
To tempt potential husbands
many maidens in the Orient, espe
cially in Asia Minor, build up nice
dowries by weaving rugs. With
their earnings thfy buy perforated
gold coins, which they wear as
necklaces around their necks s5
that a young village buck, at a
elance. can evaluate a girl’s worth.
Re finishing Cabinets
If the old finish of a metal kitchen
cabinet is not scratched or chipped,
a thorough cleaning to remove any
traces of greasy film, followed by
a light rubbing with'very fin* sand
paper to dull.the gloss of the old
enamel, should be sufficient prepa
ration for refinishing. After wiping
with turpentine or mineral spirits,
apply one^or .two coats of enamel
undercoater, in accordance With the
manufacturer’s directions on the
can, and finish with a eoat of
enamel of the desired tint.
Lime Essential
Lime Is essential on acid soils for
proper growth of many crop and
pasture plants. To promote this de
rired growth, sufficient lime should
Pe.applied to change the acid condi
tion to a near neutral point. Under
Host conditions in the upland area
the addition of lime to the soil else
provides calcium fbr* plant growth.
Commercial fertilizer. Incorporated
with .the soil management practices
previously mentioned, S essential
for continued high crop production.
Every crop harvested for grain,
forage or > other use removes plant
food from the’soil. Soils' under con
tinuous cropping systems, coupled
with erosion, lose their plant nu
trients faster than they can be re
placed by nature.
American Meat Packing
From a humble beginning 306
rears ago, meat packing bias grown
« become one of the nation’s larg
est industries. Meat packers in the
United States produce more than 20
Dillion pouifas of meat annually.
From five million farms and
ranches in every state the meat
packers purchase 127'miliisn cattle,
calves, hogs aift sheep fo make into
iteaks, roasts, stews, sausag^ Items
and Scanned meat, as^wtll as utiliz
ing'by-products for many pharma
ceutical and manufacturing items.
Bi-Cameral Congress -
Under its constitution. Chile ha*
a bi-cameral congress elect A di
rectly by'the people, as is the presi
dent. The latte# has somewhat the
same power as the'president of the
United States.
neavy raisers
Latest stdHatics show that the
United State* has more than 22 tele
phones for *vet*r MX) inhabitants,
compared.!* 2.2 telephones per 100
Inhabitants In the world as a whole.
New York Leads
New- ¥JKk...Citz, J3&2. ooye . tele
phones tk*n any city in the wortd,
arift a ftjjg**..
pares wita 1.296.006 in ail of South
America. ^ *
uonBjjWQneiECi b jBqt
[Bijuassn sj ;i ‘ra/taMOH uorjdiuhs
-aoa iCuep ro; ;xnp* 33bj3ab aq;
roj papuouruipoar sauojea ja pmoui*
aqi-!0 quS-AiuaM; auo pioqB jo safj
-OIBO 001 .£yfctns him o;s|od aug
•mo.* «
—._■ - r>*
Time Savers
At least four hours'1* week caa be
saved by aa lroner is the average
family. A saving of several hours
•SB be accomplished by the Washer,;
'gW-tetet-geie frees fcatw-easemafr.
te several wests s year.
ECONOMIC
HIGHLIGHTS
Happenings That Affect the
Dinner Pails, Dividend Checks
and Tax Bills of Every Individ
ual National and International
Problems Inseparable fro Local
Welfare
No one knows how long it will
last, but it is evident that this
country is still enjoying a hell
for-leather period of economic
prosperity. For more than a year,
leading economists have been fore
casting recessions and depressions
none of which have materialized.
Last June, according to Depart
ment of Commerce figures, per
sonal incomes in the United States
hit th record annual rate of $193,
000,000.000. In that same month
the number of productively em
ployed people passed the 60,000,
000 mark for the first time, and
the July figure was still higher, j
It is true, of course, that the i
purchasing power of the dollar
is much lower than in previous j
times. Even so, wawge increases j
have, for the most part, kept pace
with price increases, and in some
industries have materially exceed,
ed them. The major exceptions
to the rule have been the white
collar and professional classes,
whose earnings, measured by the
yardstick of purchasing power. I
are less than during and before1
the war. People living on fixed
incomes have taken a tremendous j
financial beating. It is the labor- i
ing groups which have benefited
most.
Herbert Hoover recently said '
that he could not foresee any im
portant drop in businesss in the
near future. That point of view
is widely shared at the present
time, even by some of the com
mentators who anticipated econ
omic upheavals this summer. This
optimism as to the immediate out-!
look is producing increased pessl
mism as to the long-term outlook
on the theory that the longer the
boom lasts th„ more severe will
!
be the break when it comes. It
is situation where the old prize- ,
ring dictum that “the bigger they ,
are the harder they fall” applies.
But this is in the realm of specu
lation. The business indices are
still going up, and the goal of
“full employment” seems to have
been reached. In many important
lines, output would be a great
deal larger than at present if
more supplies were available.
Every consumer knows that r71
this has done to prices. Here, a
gain. those who forecast last f .11
that substantial price brea’:j
would come by mid-1947 ww<_; e I
badly fooled. The Bureau of Labor
Statistics price index recently
touched another new high, and
it is expected to go higher still.
That is the result of many factors
governmental fiscal policy, fore
ign buying in a tight market, ever
expanding business overhead, etc.
To choose the most obvious rea
son, higher prices are inevitable
when 66,000,000 people, earning
the highest pay in history, are
panting goods and services of all
kinds. There are still many people 1
to whom price is of little conse
quence—as the so-called “used |
automobile” market abundantly j
proves. Throughout the country,!
1947 automobiles bring bonuses of ,
from $400 to $1500 on the used- |
i car lots—and dealers report tnat
f there is no dearth of purchasers. 1
The loosening of the regulations
on time-payment purchases has
been a factor in keeping sales of
expensive articles at the peak
level. When families run out of
cash, they can keep on buying on
liberal installment terms. In some j
fields, such as radios, evidence of j
over-production is apparent, espici
ally of unknown brands. But stap
le, advertised goods of all kinds
are selling well.
Very few people believe that
this is a healthy economy. Econ
omists for industry shake their
heads when they start talking
about the long-time future. So do
thee conomists for the labor un
ions. All of them are concerned
wiht what might happen if we
had a depression accompanied by
high prices. It has never happened ,
in this country. Ie hashappened
in many other countries. And is
definitely an unpleasant prospect.
Practically everyone is now con.
vinced that U- S.-Soviet relations
■Will.-continue to deteriorate. at
least for^the ijecst-^^ai^or ^o. The
fetiprfi Bops* hat; w«rs opcewidely
hWa ^or’ Wfe.1 fcoepefatton %etw een j 1
the two powers to rehabliiate
Europe and the Far East have
evaporated like dew in the desert.
In informed U. S. quarters, it
is also believed that this is per
fectly in accord with the plans of
the Stviet top command; Russia, j
the belief goes, is determined to
circummt any American plan for >
European stabilization. Reason: 1
A hungry and hopeless Europe Is j
a happy htthtlhg gibmrkr for the j
ThI* Soviet policy baa paid oft )
HoriionUl
1 Female
servant
5 To- discon
tinue*
9 Golf club
11 Dawn
13 Skill'
14 “The magic
city”
16 Prefix: not
17 Note of
chromatic
scale
18 He defeated
Jack Johnson
in 1915
20 French for
• 4J»*
21 Military cap
23 Powerful
deity*
24 Sum
26 Unaccom
panied
28 Two ems
30 Weathercock,
31 Public writer
34 Framing in
which panes
of glass are
set
36 Note of scale
37 Group of
eight
40 To genuflect
42 Alas!
44 Bones
45 Nook
16 Remote
49 110
60 Ram
62 Cubic meter
54 Pronoun
84 Flimsy
86 Tidier
18 Colloquial:
dispute
19 To come out
even
\7ertical
1 Girl’s name
9 Siamese coin
9 Indefinite
nominative
4 Prefix: half
6 Riding whip
6 City in
•datum to N«*t Isaac. H
.. ■■■ ■in- ■ » i. i„ 1 i1 io "n
No. 12 1
7 Electrified
particle
8 One who
shows
endurance
9 Cold-weather
garment
10 Colloquial:
to vex #
11 Chalice
12 Archaic:
to anoint
il5 To mitigate
18 Hoisted
19 House for
pig^bns
22 Armed band
25 Small pies
27 Comparative
suffix
29 Pronoun
32 Exists
33 Negative
34 Parodies
35 Cancels
38 To shun
3? One who
levies
imposts
41 Hungarian
composer
43 Colloquial:
fanciful story
47 Pen for pigs
48 To require
51 Slang:
initiative
33 Music:
as written
55 Molten lava )
57 Land '
measure
Answer to Pnsxle Number 11
*
f«rUi H 41
so far. The extent of Russian
gains since VE Day has been a
mazing. In countries such as Hun
gary, the communists completely
dominate the government—even
though, in the last free election,
communist candidates got less
than 20 per cent of the vote. The
oether parties have been outlawed
or made impotent. The last-ditch
dissenters have had an ominous
habit of disappearing—save for
the fortunate few who have man
aged to escapg to Eengland, the
United States, and South America.
The communist group in ranee
is extremely aggressive, and is
obviously engaged in an all-out
drive for power. This is one of
the worst Anglo-American head
aches at the present time.
READ THE OMAHA GUIDE
“If Payu To Look Wetl"
MAYO’S BARBER SHOP
Ladies and Children's Work
A Specialty
*'* 2422 Lake Street
——— - f
•this, AMBROSE, IS POSITIVELY THE ONLYlWAY
l FIND OUR ELECTRIQAL WIRING 'CONVENIENT?"
Don’t overload your electric circuit*. When you
build or modernize provide ADEQUATE WIRING.
NE1RASKA-IOWA ELECTRICAL COUNCIL
NOW OPEN
Hurry Back Cede
We are at your service featuring well
seasoned home cooked foods.
Try Our Sorted Cold Plates
2229 Lake St. JA 9195
J. Mason and E. Washington, Props:
*
ht*Hf**^**|TT*“—..“••*"**~r-~‘",if‘f~‘T‘ffT*rinrtini'Tiim inmwnMiHinBin.iriHii , .....
-MARY’S
CHICKEN wit
• BARBECUED RIBS &
SOUTHERN FRIED CHICKEN
“OUR Chicken Dinners Are
Somethin ft to Crote About.”
ROBERT JONES, PROPRIETOR
JA. 8946 2722 North 30th St.
IMMt,'. ---- ■-— —im~ —KlM
Neighborhood Furnace Go.
2511 Qwrle* Street
—-GUTTERING SPOUTING A REPAIRS_
INSTALLATION; OF OIL, GAS, COALf STOKERS
Txrramged AT-7518 I