The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, July 19, 1947, Image 3

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Staffing the 24th Infantry Regiment at Gifu, Japan, are 134 officers, 65 of whom are Negroes. A part of the 25th “Tropic Lightning” Division, the veteran 24th was
recently commended by 8th Army Commander, Lieutenant General Robert L. Hichelberger, who voioed “a deep feeling of pride” as he commented upon the work of officers ar.d
men which had “made the unit rank among the finest in soldierly appearance.” Commanding ^e 24th is Colonel M. EL Halloran, Fayetteville, North Carolina. Serving under
him, in staff positions and commanding companies, are one Major; 20 Captains; 19 First Lieutenants; 18 Second Lieutenants; five Chief Warrant Officers and one Warrant Off. |
cer, Junior Grade, all of whom are Negroes. Sixteen Negro officers serve in varied capacities on the Regimental staff and in special Maff capacities. Among their duty assign
ments are included the functions of procurement, personnel and supervision of the Regiment’s'Motor Transport. There are three assistants to the Personnel officer and one
assistant to the Regimental Adjutant. The assistant Regimental Supply officer and the Regimental Recruiting offieer are Negroes. Three Chaplains, one Medical Registrar, a
Police and Prison officer and a Postal officer are also members of the Regimental staff. In Battalion Staff positions are a Gommnnications officer, and a Battalion Motor Trans- ,
port officer. Twelve of twenty unit commands are held by Negroes, including command of a Quartermaster Laundry Platoon which services the Regiment. Thirty .junior off- ,
eerg are platoon leadens and fill executive, administrative and training responsibilities at the company level. Junior positions in companies are held by 17 white officer*.
Pictured here are Colonel Hallosan, Commanding Officer of the 25th Infantry Regiment, and niae members of his officer staff. Top row (left to right) are: Colonel Halloran;
Captains Thomas A. Wright, Dayton, Ohio, commander of Company “I”; Raymond A. Montgomery, Washington, D. C., commander of Company “A”; Raymond A. Diggs,
Washington, Di C„ commander of Company “C” and First Lieutenant W’illiam C. English, Roxbury, Massachusetts, commander of Company “E”. These company oomnaaoders
formerly served with the 366th Infantry Regiment. Lieutenant English served in combat as a member of the 758th Tank Battalion. Recipient of a Regular Army commission .
in the first integration program is (lower left) Captain William E. Gott, Jersey City, New Jer»“y, Regimental Medical Registrar. Also pictured (bottom left to right) are
Captains Eldridge Carter. Cleveland, Ohio, commander of Company “F”; William A. Bobo, St. Louis, Missouri, commander of the Service Company; Perkins Ford, Chicago,
Illinois, commander of Company “D” and John H. Droughn, Newark, New Jersey, comma’^der of Company “B”. ({Signal Corps Photos from War Department Public Infor
mation Division.) _ ..." ><«..• r- ■_
PROBLEMS i
HUMANITY!
Editor’s Note:- Submit your problem* for publication to ABBE'
WALLACE, ft care oi this newspaper. G,ive your full :^me. ad
dress and birthdate. For a "private reply" send Abbe'a stamped
envelope and twenty-five cents for one of his new cyid inspiring
■LESSONS FOR HAPPIER LIVING." Your letter wilj. be treated
confidenttally. Send 25 cents in coin, stamps or money order.
Address four letter to: The ^R3E' WALLACE Service, in care of.
M. B.—We have been married
for 16 months and it seems like
we are not happy. My Husband
wants to run our married life
like he did his men in the army.
We are planning to go to Chicago.
Do you think it wise?
Ans: Your husband lived ac
cording to strict rules and regu
lations in the service and grew to
like it. Now he wants to operate
his own home efficiently. Let hjm
take over the helm for awhile
and give him your best cooperat
ion. feu will accomplish more if
you do. The change to Chicago
will prove a profitable one.
W. C.—The last adjvce you gave
me helped so much and that is
why I'm writing today. My boy
friend and I really loved each
other and I want to know if what
I think is the reason he lost all his
love for me so suddenly?
Ans: Your fussy disposition an.
noyed him all right, but jt was
his son’s visit that influenced him
to take the final step. Send for
Lesson No. 2—How to hold Your
Mate, price 25 cents. It will in
terest you.
M. G.—We try to treat everyone
nice but we don't ever have any
company. People say they will
come but never do. Please tell us
w'hat to do ?
Ans: If you like company you
must take the initiative and in
vite your friends to see you. Plan
a little party or buffet supper
and invite them in on these spec
ial occasions. They wfll come.
People don't visit as they once
did without a speecial invitation.
M. C. G.—My husband and I
never did have any kind of trouble
He gave me a vacation and sent
me to St. Loujs. While there he
sent word that we could never get
along and wanted a divorce. I call
ed and asked him about it and he
told me he did not say any such
thing. Now I don’t know what I
should do. He doesn’t know that
we are going to become parents.
Ans: Catch the next train home
You have been away long enough. I
Your husband will welcome you
with open arms and the good news
you have will thrill him no end for
he’s always wanted to be a
popper.
X. M.—Please help me. I am
heartbroken. My 16% year old son
slipped away and married a 20
year old girl 3 weeks ago. I feel
terrible about it. She set her cap
for him at last a year ago but 1
didn't think that she would take
it this far. What must I do?
Ans: Accept her in the family
and make the best of the situation
They have ljved together a month
now and you couldn't separate
them if you tried. They love each
other and are self supporting, so
give them your best wishes.
C. P.—My husband sent a pict
ure of me to his first wife and it
made me mad with him. I told him
to get it back and he told me to
get another husband. Now should
I go on worrying about this pict
ure, We have four kids, I am not
able to work.
Ans: Feel flattered by your
husband's actions—ha’s proud of
you or he would not have mailed
your picture to his first wife. This
isn't an insult, by any means. Get
back in his good graces again and
prove to him that you can be just
as sweet as you rook.
American Meat Packing
Frflim a humble beginning 30#
rears ago, meat, packing has grown
» become one of Hie nation’s larg
est industries. Meat pickers in the
doited States*produee more than'20
Difljon pounds of meat annually.
From five million farm* and
raaaches in every state the meat
packers purchase 127 million cattle,
calves, hogs and sheep to make into
itaaks, roasts, stews, sausage items
and canned meat, as well as utiliz
ing by-products fdr many pharma
ceutical and manufacturing items.
Bringing Christ '
i —
ST.LOUIS, Mo,—In a special
I radio address heard over the Mut
ual Broadcasting System and af
I filiated stations, the Rev. Dr. John
I W. Behnken, President of the
Missouri Synod Lutheran Church
spoke on ‘ Comfort for the Afflict
ed”. Heard over the International
Lutheran Hour, Dr. Behnken de
clared: ‘ When we consider the
horrible aftermath of the world’s j
most terrible holocaust, there
leaps to our attention the suffer
ing of millions so appalling that
it beggars all description. ^Perhaps
we do not like to hear it. Perhaps
we are becoming calloused to ac
counts of suffering which know
no parallel. Perhaps we have
hardened ourselves to the cries
of distress and to the pathetic
pleas for help. We are thousands
of miles removed from the actual
woe and misery and besides we
are so engrossed with our mater
ial affairs that we pay little or
no attention to he pitiful plea. It
is good that from time to time
government experts forcibly re
i mind us that there is urgent need
of physical relief because people
• are hungary. Yes, they are hunary.
Millions are undernourished. They
need clothing and shelter. Many
are sik and the severe winter has
claimed many victims.”
The radio speaker continued:
“Saint Paul’s most convincing
evidence of comfort and assurance
reads: “Our light affliction—
worketh for us a far more exceed
ing and eternal.'' The apostle
draws a comparison between the
weight of glory.” The apostle
draws a comparison between the
weight of affliction and the
weight of glory. Affliction has its
weight but it pales into insignifi
cance when compared with the
weight of glory. Note well that
the apostle who ordinaily is not
given to the use of superlatives
in this instance not merely uses
the term “exceeding” nor does he
mm NEVER DIE gy Stto* 7** ]|
■ A NATIVE OF BROOKLYN. H-Y DR.
■ SECKt AJTENDED long island
'g MEDICAL COLLEGE WHERE HE WON
B FORO PRI^E FOR THE BEST
B DISSECTION OF ANATOMY.'
g; LATER HE'GAVE UP A VERY
■ SUCCESSFUL GENERAL PRACTICE
P TO PURSUE SPECIAL STUDY IN
I PROCTOLOGY Cdiseases df the
■ rictus').TO DO THIS FREELY DR
B PEYTON HAD TO STUDY IN MON*
“ JflEAL. LONDON.PAR IS, AND
9 STOCKHOLM' A TALENTED P!AN'
M 1ST,HE PAID HIS WAY BY LEADING
I A MIXtO,RECORD! Nfr, DANCE
g ORCHESTRA IN LONDON/
* RETURNING TO THE STATES HE
■ SERVED AS A SPECIALIST in
■ PHILADELPHIA'S DOUGLASS AND
■ MERCY HOSPITALS. AND AS AN
'JJ: INSTRUCTOR OF PROCTOLOGY
g| AT HOWARD UNu'w-SlTY
| IN 1946 DR. PEYTON WAS
B INVITO^ BY THE BRAZILIAN
B- GOVERNMENT to SPEAK OW
B £,A£.CER °F THD K-CTUM" AT THE
H FIRST INT6H*AMERICAN
I MEDICAL CON&i/LSS.HELDIN
■ RIO DETANF.RO'HE DELIVERED
a HISADDRrCO FRENCH/
L, .AN EXTREMELY ,MODEST AND
B "HUMAN " M ‘'; T.«. PEYTON IS
M CURRENTLY tv . !ClNC-ASA
43! SPECIALIST IN Pt -A'/PA.
St ::33FWr
To The Nation
mm » -- ~ ■ j
I
say “more exceeding’’, but em- j
phasizes “far more exceeding’’ j
weight of glory—Thus God focus- J
es our eyes upon the true and abid
ing comfort when we are in the
throes of affliction. That consoles
and strengthens us no matter how
heavy our cross or how sore uor
sorrow. That teaches us to realize
that afflictions are blessings in
disguise. And when at last we
reach our heavenly goal we shall
thank God even for the chasten
ing and the fiery trials through
which He led us.’’
78 Attend Baptist
Intsitute At
Morehouse College
ATLANTA Ga„—Seventy-eight
ministers and church workers who
were interested in furthring their
knowledge of religious subjects,
enrolled in the four-day Institute
for Baptists held on the campus
of Morehouse College, July '-i.
Under the direction ofDr. George
D. Kelsey, th program of the In
stitute was designed to promote
and further Christian fellowship
among Baptist, and to be helpful
to serious students of religion and
theology.
In addition to the fifty regist
rants from Atlanta, there were
other Georgians from Newmnan,
Fort Gaines, Augusta, Habira.
Waycfbss, Eastman, College Park.
Norwood, Macon, Milledgevilie,
Rome, Savannah, Marietta Albany
Gainesville, Crawfordsville, Cal
houn, Griffin, Senoia andMadison
From elsewhere there reprentat
ives from Rockaway Bach, New
York, and also Tuskegee, Ala..
Lecturers at the Instuitute in
cludeed Rev. Charles Emerson
Boddie, pastor of Mount Olivet
Baptist Church, Rochester, New
York; Rev. Phillip James McLean
minister of Central Baptist Chur
ch, Newnan, Ga; Rev. Leonard E.
Terrell, pastor of Bethel Baptist
Institutional Church of Jackson
vule, Flordia;and Dr. James D.
Tyms of Morehouse College. Top
ics discussed were ‘Religious Ed
ucation in the Local Church,”
“Mesasges of the Old Testament’’,
“Portraits of Christ” and “Wor
ship and Music.”
Lime Essential
Lime is essential on acid soil# fcrr
?roper growth of many crop and
pasture plants. To promote this de4
fired growth, sufficient lime should
be applied to change the acid condi
tion to a near neutral poird. Under
most conditions’in the upland area
the addition of lime to the. soil also
provides-'calcium for plant growth.
Commercial fertilizer, Incorporated
with the sail management practice
previously mentioned, is essentisd
I fo7 continued high crop production.
I Every crop harvested for grain,
1 forage er other use removes plant
food from the soil. Soils under con
tinuous cropping systems, coupled
with erosion, lose their plant nu
trients faster than they can be re
placed by nature.
United Negro
College Fund
Gets $1*800 Donation
NEW YORK—Contributions to
taling $1,815.63 were received by (
the United Negro College Fund
during the past few weeks from
American Negro soldiers station
ed abroad and in this country,
Frank M. Tooton, national camp
aign chairman, announced this
week.
‘For the fourth consecutive year
support from Negro soldiers both
at home and overseas has been a
source of great inspiration,” Mr.
Totton declared. “These men have
written that they are anxious to
1 help strengthen these colleges so
that they may better serve the
nation.”
Overseas contributions came
from the 4479th Quartermaster
Salvage Platoon, 343 Quarter
master Laundry Unit No,2, 5G7th
Medical Motor Ambulance Co.,
630th and 639th Ordinance Am
munition Co., 785th Ordinance De
pot Co., 117th, 3693rd, 3441st 4524
3444th and the 3522nd. Trans
portation Truck Co., 147th Port
Co> and 52nd Transportation Corp
Stevedore Co.
Units in the states contributing
substantial amounts were the En
listed men’s Council, 696th Ordi
nance Ammunition Co., Fort Sill
Okla.; and the 49th Transportat
portation Truck Co., Fort Eustis,
Va. There were also individual
gifts.
The 1947 campagin for $1,300,000
is still under way in many of the
major cities.
LONGSHOREMEN TO AID
TEXAS CITY BLAST VICTIMS
NEW ORLEANS—The executive
board of the South Atlantic and
Gulf Coast District of the Inter
national Longshoremen’s Associa
tion, AFL in its recent meeting
in Carpenter’s Hall, voted nearly
one thousand dollars to aid the
victims of the Texas City disaster
and to plan strategy for the pre
vention of such holocausts In the
future.
This blast and a smaller one in j
Wilmington, Calif., was caused by j
insufficient safety regulations, I
hence the union is taking up the
fight for more stringent obser- j
vahce of safeguards for the life |
and limbs of workes. The object- j
ives of the union include safty'
as well as better wages and short
er hours.
Live on a Potato
One potato will supply i» ealo- •
rfes or about one twenty-fifth of the
amocnt of calories recommended for '
the average adult for da*y con- i
sumption. However, it is essential j
that a balanced ration *>e utilized
ll
Df. I
LIGHTENS dark SKIN 1
oosons BLACKHEADS *
_ /TVJ „ du.c.rt
Ministers Seminar
Closes Session
at Florida College
BY DR. LEONARD E. MORRIS
JACKSONVILLE Fla.—The min
ister's seminar, conducted by the ,
B. F. Lee Theological Seminary
at Edward Waters College, has re
cently closed its sessions. The ex
ercises were informal but im
pressive. Highlight of the clos
ing session was a stirring ad
dress given by Rev. James M.
Wise, dean of presiding elders in
Florida. Dr. Wise, wealthy resi
dent of Tallahassee, is rounding
out 53 years in the ministry, 33
vears of which have been spent as
a presiding elder, His address was
filled with the wisdom of experi- ;
ence and the zeal of brotherly,
love.
Presiding was Dr. D. B. Thorpe,
deem of the Seminary. Gracing ths
platform with him were the Chan- !
cellor, Bishop H. T. Tookes. pres
ident Amos J. Wrhite, Dr. C. A,
Gibbs, Florida candidate for the
Bishopric the presiding elders of
the West Florida Conference, Dr.
E. Harley R. W. Whitehurst, J. W.
Walker and the presiding elders
of the East Florida Conference.
Drs. T. W. Bullaard, J. W. Bour
roughs, J. E. A. Carey and G. C.
Bledsoe.
Touchjng and heart wanning so
los were sung by Mrs. Rheutelia
Johnson. Dr. W. A. Jennings and
Dr. A. W. Bowles. The conferr
ing of honorary degrees by Bis
hop Tookes brought the exercises
to a close. Dean Thorpe presented
to the Chancellor the following for
the degree of Dr. of Divinity: Rev.
E. B. Daniels of St. Paul, Ocala;
Rev, W. B. Coffey of Mt. Moriah,
Cocoa; Rev. D. J. Carter of St
James. Aubumdale and Rev. A,
W. Bowles of Amette Chapel,
Quincy.
President A. J. White presented
the following for the degree of Dr.
of Laws: Rev. J. J. Heath of Mt.
Zion; St, Petersburg; Dean E. C.
Mitchell of Morris Brown College;
Rev. A. P. Postelle, presiding eld
er of West Palm Beach District;
and Rev. W. A. Jennings of Mt.
Herman, Fort Lauderdale.
The faculty serving the Minis -
ters seminar this year was Dr. D
B, Thorpe, dean, History of Re
ligion; Dr. Leonard F. Morse vice- I
dean, Public Speaking. Hymno
logy, Greek New Ttestament; Dr
Amos J. White, President, Morden
Missions; Dean E. E. King New
Testament History; Dr. W. A..
Jennjngs, Old Testament History
Dr. Mj D. Chappelle, Church His
tory, Dr. H. T. Prim, Pastoral
Theology; Dr. E. C. Mitchell, Re
ligious Education Dr. C. A. Gibbs.
Psychology of Religion, Rev, J. A.
Roberts, Church Finance.
. soys Mrs. M. Moen
1717 North 50th
"and My Electrie Range
Proved Itself 100% Clean"
“I mw your ad,” say* Mrs. Moen, "about wiping •
pan. just off the range, with a clean towel. Well, I tried
it And the towel stayed white as snow. I really wasn’t
surprised. Ever since F ve had my electric range, I
haven’t had to scour pots and pans. Dirt and grease
don’t collect on my walls and curtains, and there’s not
all that greasy ‘fuzz’ behind the range, either. Electric
cooking is absolutely clean! I’m completely satisfied with
it in every other way, too. I wouldn't ever trade it for
another cooking method!”
★ * *
**•
Once you’ve cooked on an electric range, you'll agree
that- it’s superior in every respect. If you're not already
cooking with flameless electricity, why put off enjoying
modern cooking any longer! Why oot have an electric
range in your kitchen!
Electric Cooking Is
CLEAN • FAST • SAFE • MODERN • ECONOMICA
i J
gJgpilLjUS • *
New slant on high style in Sandler's
'-1 * exclusive "A-Cute’’ angle last. Your foot seem* > 1
^ £ smaller, looks smarter. Impeccably tailored
„ i Sportster, perforated, stitched, polished to a gleam.
j For Hot SuMiUcr Day* -.6.93