The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, October 12, 1946, Page 6, Image 6

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    -- IW* *** W«A«T CAM m> COUNSEL AND CUIPAHCI
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— »■» ril - »•“<■ tfca mla at rtuoa. Wnu ia
™* *•»! WALLACE SERVICE
f. O. lox li. Atlanta I, Georgia
U C E—I Just finished reading
your column as I do every week.
Now I have read of the problems
of others and now I have one of
my own. I am a veteran and I am
suppose to start to business school
on the 14th of October under the
GI bill of rights I have made all
arrar.irements and now I find that
I don't have enough clothes to be
gin I suppose I could borrow but
I don’t care to do so. I am unde
UR«.E I.O%» PREFERRED
Kindling per load $5 00 j
HI. «( K«TO\F.
LUMP COAL S11601
per ton
| JONES FUEL & SUPPLY
Company
2520 Lake Street
Phone AT 5631
GOOD OPPORTUNITY
TWO *•(*. rararr aa4 adjolnla*, aa
aMIkMni raraer 2l*t aa4 Grara
Cilri'i r Iroalair aa bulb 2lat Ml
biarr I4*al lar 2 ar ware home*
ar >»w« tally >alir4 a* (karri
giaanl., Make rraaaaabla offer
IXVMlM rl'.l l. A44rraa BOX ASM
ar Call II % 41144.
3404 Bedford Ave.
Is located on a double comer lot,
100a 128- 6 rooms, all modem, and
with a downstairs bedroom, kitch
en cabinets, oak floors throughout
automatic water heater, garage.
Price $4000. Mr. Beckman,
AT -4976.
AMOS GRANT CO.
Realtors _AT. 8380
NOW IS THE TIME TO GET
TOUR SHOES REBUILT_
Quality Material A Guaranteed
Quality Work
LAKE SHOE SERVICE
2407 Lake Street
48IIIIMIMIIII llllllllllindllllllllllllllllH
2 f th & l ake Sts.
T» PRESCRIPTIONS
k Free Ilelivo v
-Wt-ObO*,—
Duffy Pharmacy
SMWIimillllllllMIIIIIMIMIIIMHimnij
D Designed to speedily relieve
ample headache and painful
ciseomforts of neuralgia.
Measured doses — In powder
lT form tor quick assimilation.
B Proof of merit Same type for
mula over one-third century.
D Standard U S. P. Ingredients.
Laboratory tested, controlled.
Bln price range of everyone.
10c and 35c sizes
Caution: Use only as directed.
Buu -T«y — M w I
FT—F m
cided whether to go ahead with
the clothes I have or wait until I
(,et more clothes to begin school?
Ans: You shouldn’t put too
much emphasis on clothes. It’s a
well known fact that there is a
definite shortage of men’s appar
el and if you had plenty of money
you still wouldn’t be able to get
hat you wanted. Your wardrobe
's adeouate to begin school on.
You are going to school to seek
knowledge and prepare your=elf
”or a profession. Under no circum
stances should you allow a defi
ciency in your wardrobe to inter
fere with your plans to get an edu
cation.
A L I—I am with my third hus
band and it seems like I haven’t
found the right one yet. Several
years ago I started a course in
beauty culture and did not com
plete it. I am thinking of taking
j it up again as I have always been
! "terested in this type of work.
Advise me what to do?
Ans: It’s impossible to succeed
in anything unless you have the
i perserverance to stick with it. And
that holds true with marriage as
well as with a profession. Take
up the course if for no other rea
son than to prove to yourself that
you can start a job and finish it.
You can yet find happiness with
your husband if you were to give
up the idea that perhaps he was
not the right one. Search no fur
ther and learn to appreciate the
man you have. d
L A T—My baby’s daddy is in
New York. I came to Florida be
fore my child was born and am
living with my mother and step
father. He promised to do a lot
for us but failed to do anything. I
if I should go back
to New York where he is or go
to work in Miami. I do not love
him and he is quite a bit older
than I am.
Ans: You admit that you don't
love the baby’s father so why think
of going back to New York to re
open an unpleasant situation? He
failed you in your hour of need
and he isn’t worthy of any consi
deration on your part. Remain in
Florida and get work so that your
mother can help you rear your in
fant.
E W—I am a serviceman and
here lately I met a young college
girl and one day I made a mistake
of taking a boy friend of mine
over to see her. Now he goes with
her too. The other night she was
out with him having a good time
and se was letting him kiss on her
and when I asked her about it she
said she was only pretending. And
what puzzles me is she 'will do al
most anything I ask her but yet
she will let my boyfriend hang
around too and he comes back
bragging what all he can do. Now
I want to know which one of us
does she love ?
Ans: The little lady isn’t ready
to settle down keeps, Mac. She is
having too much fun. Don't push
her she'll get serious if you make
the right impression. Join in the
fun. .if she wants to frolic cut
loose and enjoy yourself. Date
some of the other girls around the
campus while you are about it too.
E L—I have a friend and he
gives me plenty of money but he
has a wife. He will do anything I
ask him to do. Now I have another
friend that I really love but he
doesn’t give me any money and 1
when I ask for anything he says j
he doesn't have it. Now which one
should I plan to go with regular
ly?
Ans: Surely you realize that
you are jeopardizing your reputa
tion by going with a married man.
He pays off now but it will be you
who will pay in the long run if you
do not bring this affair to a close.
Become self-supporting and inde
pendent. Accepting money from
men is a very bad policy a sit de
finitely places you under obliga
tion to them. You need to make
new acquaintances if you desire
marriage and a normal home life.
Classified Ads Get Results! I
\AooiJ Like to Biiy 39 to 42 model cap from private party. WA-8289
• MrBrady Products Orders
Taken at 2506 Burdette St..
Telephone JArkson 7284.
—Mrs. C. M. Eider.
HOME LAUNDRY
WANTED!
We Specialize in Flat Work and
Ruff-Dryed Bundles.
We Mend and Sew on Buttons.
• PERRY HOME LAUNDRY
1110 North 23rd St. AT-5623
m~AVT()S WASTED!
SELL IS YOl it CAR
FOR CASH!
• We will come to your home.
Fred King Motors
AT 9463 2056 Famam
NEIGHBORHOOD IWHIl'M
A CLOTHING SHOP
BIG SALE—overcoats, all sl*es
Shoes. Na Stamps: Ladies Dresses
Ru<s. Beds. Gas Stoves and Ol
Stoves.
“We Buy and Sell” —
TEL. AT. 11S4 I7U N. Mth ST.
Seeks W itnesses
Would Parties whom saw accident
of Alberta Norman on Crosstown
car at twenty-fourth & Lake Sts.,
on Sept. 29. please call WE. 2754,
CHICKEN DINNERS
MARY’S CHICKEN HUT, 2722 N.
j 30th St.. JA. 8946. Our Chicken
dinners are Something to Crow A
bout. Robt. Jones, Propr.
DAY NURSERY Mother’s Care
2537 Patrick, JAckson 0559.
LAlMUmES A CLEAVERS
EDHOLH A SHERMVN
t4«l Vortta 24th St WE. 6088
Piano, bed, misc. furniture.
3701 S. 26th St. MA-1006.
IS etc S: l sed Furniture
Complete Line—Paint Hardware
We Buy, Sell and Trade
IDEAL FURNITURE MART
8511-13 North 24th— 24th & I ake
—WEhster 2224—
"Everything For The Home"
FOR RENT 2 room apt. for couple
only. AT. 6281.
DO’S AND DON‘TS:
'"~‘*OMTtHtNTA t |
- \
\
The average sidewalk isn’t baby carriage boulevard Be
considerate and leave room or the baby-less pedestrians.
BREEZY By T. MilVM
kTHANKA* FOR.THE S^Ay^BRiEZY-HOV^l ^UIlu^SYUi^fB^TWmftZTOttAeieTO]
3\NPY, ‘SYLVESTER' COME YOU AND THAT# 'PLANNING ON BEING A W [SAY 'ONE OF HIS BEST1
^IENP$ WA$QNE/"
JIM STEELE By MELVIN T^PLEY
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FROM HERE -THEY 'LL! THE JUNGLE,SUDDENLY, THE GROUND
HAVE DISCOVERED THAT GAVE WAY &ENEATH HIM/Y—
I'VE ESCAPED BY NOW
Y... MAY BE FOLLOW! N&J
THETRAILTHAT y—r^l
CLUMSY OX LEPT/jS&pf
THIS VERY, yjftgW }
MOMEN
THE ROAD TO HEALTH
UNDULANT FEVER
By R. Stillmon Smith, M. D.
Chairman, executive board Georgia
State Medical and Pharmaceutical
Association Macon, Georgia
Mrs. Alice Brown had had a
difficult winter. Her husband was
still in the army and her two chil
dren seemed to catch every child
hood disease that year, .whooping
cough, measles, chicken pox and
then mumps.
The strain of taking care of the
children through one siege after
another told on her and we were
all glad when she decided to take
the children and spend the summer
with her mother in the country.
We thought it would do her as
much good as it would the young
sters.
So it was a great disappointment
to all of us when Mrs. Brown came
back to town looking worse than
she had when she went away. A
few days after her return I ran
into her on the street and she told
me she was so tired and listless
that she thought something must
be wrong and she was coming by
to see me at the office soon. I
urged her to do so and suggested
perhaps she should have a thor
ough physical examination.
About a wee klater she did come
to the office. She said the night
before she had had chills and fe
ver followed by sweating and se
vere pain in her arm. She thought
perhaps she had arthritis. In an
swer to my questions, she said she
thought she had been running a
temperature, off and on, for sev
eral weeks and that she always !
seemed to be exhausted.
The symptoms Mrs. Brown de
scribed might point to any one of
a number of illnesses. The pain in
her arm might mean arthritis.
Malaria might be suspected from
the chills and fever. The tired feel
ing with fever and night sweats
made one think of some general in
fection coming on over a period
of weeks, such as perhaps tuber
culosis.
uoviousiy, tne tirst thing to do
was to give Mrs. Brown a com
plete physical examination. This in
eluded a chest X-Ray which show
ed that her lungs were sound so
she did not have tuberculosis. And
other tests eliminated the possibi
lity of malaria, arthritis and rheu
matic fever.
There were other diseases which
I had suspected Mrs. Brown might
have. Of the special tests I made
one showed that she had undulant
fever.. so named because the fever
rises and falls, comes and goes.
Now death rarely results from \
undulant fever, but it is a very
mean disease. It causes the patient
great pain and suffering and is
stubborn to cure. Sometimes with
proper treatment, the disease does
clear up in a few weeks. Then
again, even with good care the pa
tient may suffer recurring attacks
of undulant fever for years. At
tacks of fever may last a few hours
or several days. They cause great
pain and leave the patient com
pletely exhausted.
I told Mrs. Brown that she must
go to bed and stay in bed and
instructed her to drink quantities
of liquids. No medicine has proved
to be a certain cure for undulant
fever. There is a vaccine which
has been effective in some cases
but even with this treatment rest
is essential.
Undulant fever, or brucellosis,
which is its medical name is trans
mitted to people through animals.
It is most often found in cows,
goats and hogs. People may get
the disease by drinking raw milk
from an infected cow or by hand
ling an animal which has the di
sease.
Naturally, I wanted to know
how Mrs. Brown got the disease.
She told me that while she was
in the country she had drunk raw
fresh milk. I got in touch with the
officer of health in the county
where she had been and his invest
igation led to the discovery of a
cow infected with the disease.
This cow had supplied the milk
Mrs. Brown’s mother used. And as
strange as it may seem, Mrs.
Brown was the only person who
got undulant fever, although her
mother and children had also
drunk milk from the same cow.
But undulant fever is like that.
Mrs. Brown’s experience brought
home to me once more how dan
gerous it is for people to drink
raw milk. When milk is pasteuri
zed the germs which cause such
diseases as undulant fever are
hilled. Un-pasteurized milk is a
health hazard. For their own pro
tection people should always try
to obtain pasteurized milk for
drinking and for cooking purposes.
• IT PAY- TO.
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WHAT DO
YOU BELIEVE?
By Ruth T Taylor
“It isn t important what we be
lieve but how we express those
beliefs that matters”. “It isn’t so
much what we do but what we
are”. Those are two copy book say
ings that have been repeated and
repeated in various forms. And
they have been twisted and turned
to apply to almost every situation.
Personally I feel they are wroig.
it does matter what we believe as
much as it does how we express
those beliefs. It matters as much
what we do as what we are. But
what is most important of all is
the motive power back of BOTH
thoughts and actions.
What doesn't matter is not what
happens to us. . but whether what
we do is important to be done. We
may be personally defeated but
our principles never, a great think
er once said. The truly important
By CARL HELM
NEW 5TORK — It’s a town in
which a man could (and sometimes
does) walk up th* main drag in a
pair of purple pajamas without
causing much of a stir. Some people
would turn around, others would
speculate on “what’s the angle?”—
but the white-gloved cops wouldn’t
even give him a tumble.
It’s all in the New Yorkish “mind
your-own-business” tradition, in
creasingly accentuated in these
United Nations days by the native
garbs of Hindus and Moslems, Turks
and Ukrainians—to note but a few
—joining in the Broadway and Fifth
Ave. parade in this capital of the
workL
Swarthy, big-earringed women in
scarlet saris which swathe them
I from head to heel; Chinese beauties
in skin-tight silk gowns slashed up
the side; fiercely-bearded officers in
j jeweled turbans, pink-cheeked sol
diers in tartan kilts—they sight-see
and shop without causing a ripple.
This “mind - ycur- own - business”
fetish sometimes causes vou to
wonder, though, whether the man
you see slumped in a doorway is
placidly sleeping, or drunk, or sick
unto death, without stopping to find
out...
New theatrical season’s on, and
yon might want to hear Victor Her
bert’s fine old songs sung in the new
operetta. “Gypsy Lady,” though it’s I
pretty dull and pretentious.
thing in this world is not so much
where we stand as in what direc
tion we are moving.
Where we go wrong, .in our own
lives, in our national lives, in our
everyday responsibilities is in not
trueing out actions to a high en
ough motive. We act on expedience
not on principle. We compromise
not with things, but with our o^n
beliefs, with our own conscience.
We dodge responsibilities, we ev
ade issues and the truth eludes us
because of our own weaknesses.
Here’s an example. We say that
one of the great principles in
American life is the denial of ab
solute sovereignty. Is it? Or, ra
ther, is it put into effect ? Just
, try denying the absolute sover
eignty in ‘efficient’ organizations
and see how far you get. Did you
ever try not ‘going along with the
: boys?'
What we should have said was
that this is a motive power. . and
then try to put it into practice.
All life proceeds from beliefs
of some kind. The question is not
shall we have beliefs? But what
beliefs have we ? Are they a vital
part of our every day life? Are
we better for our beliefs? Do they
I help us to help those whose paths
our paths crosses? Unless we can
answer in the affirmative our be
liefs are vain.
EBOOK
REVIEW
HARPER’S PUBLISHES
“COLOR AND CONSCIENCE”
One answer to Bilbo’s utteran
ces on the rostrum of the Mississ
ippi State Legislature and in the
Cave of the Winds on Caoitol Hill
is daringly presented in Dr. Buell
G. Gallagher’s new book “Color
And Consciencee: The Irrepresible
Conflict”, just published by Har
per & Brothers. The first full
length treatment of religion and
race to appear in a quarter of a
century, this book minces no word
and pulls no punches as it lays
bare the hypocrisy and evasiveness
of the jim crow church. It is a
flaming indictment of what pas
ses for Christianity in America as
well as exposure of the double
dealings of political demagogues
and church politicians of every
section of the country.
The author has won for himself
a name for honesty and fearless
ness in his dealings. He is inti
mately acquainted with Negro
America, is a national director of
the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,
and was for ten years president of
Talladega College.
Now a professor of Christian
Ethics at the Pacific School of Re
ligion, Berkeley, California. Dr.
Gallagher in this book marshalls |
all the evidence of the Christian
tradition to show what the church
es must do. He tells what happen
ed when the inclusive church of
early times was taken over by the
imperial arrogance of the Roman
Empire, and the subsequent de
velopment of Christianity largely
as a white man’s religion. For the
first time, these little known facts
are presented to the general read
er.
Dr. Gallagher uses acurate thor
ough scholarship in garnering and
presenting the facts. He does not
write as the champion of Negro
rights, any more than he writes ,
to condemn a particular race or
section of the nation. This is a 1
book which distinquishes sharply
between the devils and the men of
good will i nboth races and in all
parts of the nation. The author
does not feel that he has need to
defend teh Negroes; he merely
sets down the facts and lets them
speak for themselves.
This book may well prove to be
as influential in our century as
were the writings of William Lloyd
Garrison and Harriet Beecher
Stowe, and the oratory of Freder
ick Douglass in the heated contro
versy which led up to the earlier
irrepressible conflict, the Civil
War. It is a prelude to the New
Emancipation.
• lTiTCH
for The
GUIDE'S
Cameraman!
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PICTURES '
READ THE
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! "Next Door” By ted shearer:
- ...■ ..., :i
*-->_- -^-— " ■■ ..
“. . What d’ya expect... he saves every cent he makes . !”
I - ’ ’ . ‘ . . ■* '* •* *
TAN TOPICS By CHARLES ALLEN
r--- -,-—_1
Good aiternoon Mrs. Thomas, I’d like to introduce you to
my friend!”