The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, March 30, 1946, Page 5, Image 5

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    CHICAGO MEHARRY1TES GREET PRESIDENT Dr. M. Don Clawson, able president of
Meharry Medical College, was a guest at the annual banquet held recently in Chicago at
the YWCA. Chicago alumni of the school have contributed over §18,000 toward the
$200,000 student-alumni dormitory. President Clawson revealed that over §125,000 is
already collected. Photo shows, top: Dr. S. W. Smith, §1,000; H. H. Miller, architect;
Dr. Joshua H. Brown. §1,000; Dr. and Mrs. Clawson, and Dr. T. M. Smith, §1,000. The
wives of Drs. Brown and S. W. Smith have contributed §100 each. Others who have
entered the §1000 class include Dr. j. W. Anderson, Dallas, Texas, Dr. J. L. Leach. Flint,
Michigan. §5,000; Dr. E. N. Ezidore, Lutcher, Ga., and Dr. A. B. Cooper, Atlanta, Ga. The
drive ends with the commencement in June 1946. (Atlas News Photo)
HUPP ANNOUNCES U. S.
BOND CROUP
Allen T. Hupp of Omaha, Chair
man of the Nebraska Advisory
Committee to the US Savings
Bond Division, today announced
the membership of the state group
which will assist the Treasury De
partment in the promotion and
sale of US Savings Bonds to Ne
braskans.
“The Advisory Committee is
composed of a group of prominent
citizens, representing various state
wide associations, said Mr. Hupp,
the committee feels that the con
tinued sale of US Savings Bonds
is of extreeme importance. One
of the problems facing America
today is the preservation of the
financial and economic stability
of the nation.
Our committee urges Nebrask
ans to continue buying govern
ment bonds, as a sound invest
ment, and to hold those already
purchased as a curb on runaway
inflation. Habits of thrift and sa
vings developed in the war period
through systematic bond purcha
ses should be encouraged.
Serving as vice chairmen of the
Advisory committee are:
Cel. J. Francis McDermott, vice
president of the first National Na.
tional Bank of Omaha, who or
ganized the Nebraska Defense
Savings an^ War Savings Com
mittee and George W. Holmes of
Lincoln, president of the First Na
tional Bank of Lincoln.
Other committee members and
the groups they will represent in
clude:
Agriculture, Tom Leadly, Lincoln,
Editor of the Nebraska Farmer,1
who served as Agricultural chair
man of the Nebraska War Fin
ance Committee; Banking, Rob
erts I. Stout, Tekamah, President
of the First National Bank of
Tekamah, and past president of
the Nebraska Bankers Association
who also served as American
Bankers Association state War
Bond Chairman: Women, Mrs
Robert H. Thorpe, Omaha, for
merly chairman of the Women’s
Division of the Nebraska War
Finance Committee; Industry, J.
L. Paxton, Jr„ Omaha, president
of the Pexton-Mitchell Company
and president of the Associated
Industries of Nebraska; Labor, J.
THEY’LL NEVER DIE g. ?**
SELDOM DOES A PERSON
WITH AS MANY HANDICAPS
RISE TO THE GREATNESS OF
THIS SIMPLE AND UNAFFECTED
MAN- HE WAS BORN l2o
YEARS AGO IN NEW TERSEY
THE YOUNGEST OF 18
CHILDREN/ WITHOUT FORMAL
SCHOOLING HE TAUGHT
HIMSELF ENOUGH TO WRITE
A BOOK-THE UNDERGROUND
RAILROAD"-AND ALSO TO
CONDUCT A SUCCESSFUL COAL
BUSINESS IN PHII-A-,
PA, WITH ALL OF THIS
HE NEVER FORGOT TO
LEND A HELPING HAND ,
TO THE "LITTLE PEOPLE.
FOR THIS,ALONE.
WILLIAM STILL WILL "
NiVER DIE/ - —' ***%$%*
:'*"" ■ IVW- MViU»
THE WOODCUTTER WHO
BECAME A TRUSTED _ - ^
CHAMPION OF THE PEOPLE/
J. Guether, Omaha, president of
the Nebraska State (Federation
of Labor (A F of L) and George
Paulson, Omaha, district repre
sentative of the Iowa-Nebraska
Congress of Industrial Organiza
tion.
Motion Picture Industry, William
Miskell, Omaha, district manager
Tri-States Theatres and Chairman
of that industry’s War Activities
committee; Newspapers, E C.
Leggett, Ord, editor of the Ord
Quiz and vice president of the
Nebraska Press Association; Ra
dio, Lumir Urban, Fremont, man
ager of Radio Station KORN and
president of the Nebraska Broad
casters’ Association; Retailers,
Nathan J. Gold, Lincoln, president
of Gold & Company, who served
as chairman of the Retailers di-"
vision of the Nebraska War Fin
ance Committee; and Schools, Dr.
Archer, L. Burnham, Lincoln, exe'
cutive secretary of the Nebraska
State Education Association, who
headed the Nebraska Schools at
War Committee.
‘SUGAR' ROBINSON GIVES
10 Per cent PURSE TO VET
Baltimors, Md.—(C)—Generous
IP
P U/ HO SKYRCCKETEDTO FAME AND
TT FORTUNE BY SIN6INS HER OWN
COMPOSITION ^ATISKET-ATASKET,” AND
CO-WINNER OF ESQUIRES 1946 SOLD
AWARD FOR THE NATIONS TOP FEMALE
VOCAL HONORS,- ONCE RECEIVED THE
<60NS'lNI AN AMATEUR CONTEST IK>
1935.
FATE, AND THE LATE CHICK WEBB WAS
^ IN THE AUDIENCE THAT NIGHT AND THRU
H'S LrfORiS,STARTED HER ON THE ROAD
^ to succtss. elia, hails from
NEWPORT NEWS.VA.
’** -^.T N
V.
'■ r
2 ^ > •'
.
PRESIDENT OF / r ^
MORE HOUSE COUfO* ,
IS T«E Fwt nefoo .'
elected vice-mcs.
Of THt FEDERATION
COUNCIL Q F CM WCKES
Of CHRIST i V} AMES'E a . ^
O'? MASS. THE
FORMER SEAN OF -^S
RJi-ISlWiATfOWAPOr' f
U, K THE AUTHOOSi-r-^^;
Of'thE 'IEG00'<tet ?
CHUniH AHD THE VEGRO'S
! GOD . A GRADUATE OP B ATES C ' lES*,
- #t£ Rf CEl' ’ID HiS MA ?„-<£ PnD nU'My -Jf C/CO.
Ray Robinson is partittg With 10
percent of his purse frOta the Izzy
Janazzo fight here Thursday to
veteran Johnny Braun, a Parple
heart recipient. Johnny was of
the 104th Medical Regiment.
Week
By H. W. Smitji
LOCAL
Mrs. L. V. Gray, the president
of the Women’s Society of Chri
stian Service of Clair Chapel had
the same smile on her face on
Sunday morning after four weeks
illness.
Mr. Sanderson Brown of 2123 N
29th St. is very much improved
from a stroke.
Mrs. Pankey and Mrs. Johnson
New York Show Fronts...
JOSH W HITE, BILLIE
HOLIDAY TOASTS TO N Y’s
WHITE NIGHTLIFE; WHY
IS DESCRIBED
New York—Two Negro music
ians are assured of their places in
the listening schedules and pro
grams of most music loving whites
that is, the whites who enjoy the
jazz and swing. One, Bilie Holi
day, will probably go down in the
books as one of the popular mu
sic's all time great artists; the
other Josh White, will undoubted
ly be accepted as the king of the
blues, although such a classifica
tion may be open to debate since
there are many greater blues sin
gers and players than Josh.
However, Billie Holiday does
something in her singing so odd
that listeners become bewitched
with her art and finally become
fanatic addicts of her stylings.
Josh White’s singing of the
blues is singular in that "hat he
leaves out becomes more import
ant than what he plays and sings
and that is what makes him dis
tinctive among thousands of blues
singers and guitarists. Today Bil
lie Holiday and Josh White* are
establishes firmly in New York’s
diadem of stars of the nightclubs.
Without Billie Holiday in one
of the several music rooms on 52
street, the whole street, sometimes
called Swing Lane, suffers.
Without Josh White at either
Uptown or Downtown Cafe So
ciety, Barney Josephson would
feel it immediately, whether in
receipts or in commnt of his many
guests
Bilie Holiday, Albert Ammons,
Meade Lux Lewis and Pete John
son, plus Big Joe Turner, Teddy!
Wilson, Hazel Scott and Ida Cox |
are Cafe Society pioneers. Josh,
White came 'way late to be in- i
eluded in that class. But once I
arrived, Josh has carved a place j
for himself and today ranks as!
one of nightlife's greatest attrac-1
tions He has to have an audience
that is sympathetic and willing to
listen as he musically weaves the
blue story of the Negro's ’soul. In
the Zanzibar, Latin Quarter, or
ome of the rubberneck’ joints,
Josh might presumably be lost.
Josh White’s climb to fame on
the vehicle of social conscious
singing in which he seeks through
music to impress idea3 of politica’
thinking. “Social consciousness’’
or t wasn’t any good.
Remember such plays as “Sing
For Your Supper’,’? “Sing Out
Sweet Land’ ? “Stevedore” ? Those
were "social conscious” plays stri
vng to effect a political reaction
upon the playgoer.
Josh White’s New York intro
duuction came via an album of
recordings on Columbia under di
rection of John Hammond, Jr.,
called ‘Chain Gang Blues’. Sup
ported by a quartet and with his
guitar eloquently painting in the
background of woe, trouble and
rumors of woe, and with his voice
singing in the plaintive, broken
style of the cane field blues shou
ter gone citified as in church, his
climb up the ladder was thus be
gun.
Josh White came from South
Carolna—and I think he plans to
remain FROM South Carolina. He
is the usual Negro story of abject
poverty during childhood, but also
includes the factor of a badly cut
right hand which might have for
ced him to a life of drudgery at
menial labor and thus changed his
whole outlook. But Josh seems to
have been made of sterner stuff
and surmounted the obstacle han
dily.
As a child. Josh White escorted
and accompanied blind men for
pennies and nickels and whatever
he could get his hands upon. In
thig capacity, he came to leam
life as it is—hard and cruel and
disillusioning. That is a reason
why his interpretations ring true
and why white’s who don’t know
of these things, sit enthralled lis
tening to him sing his songs.
The Josh White who was scuff
of Clair Chapel are convelesc.ng.
We often wonder how very im
portant it would be if we would
take time out to give ourselve3
the once over and let some of the
items that are looking in our face
and wake up and produce some
thing to inspire the forward up
ward step in keeping with the
times.
Encourage our firemen and po
liceman by lending a very willing
hand as we hope for a continu
ation of our race in those lines.
Major General Hershey of the
Selective Service sent a letter io
Chairman Kyle of the US Military
Affairs Committee opposing the
bill to continue the draft after
May 15, 1946.
General Motors has issued a
statement that the strike is not
over until all men return to their
jobs.
An Army plane crashed near
Truckie, Calif, on March 18 and
it is feared 26 persons were kil
led.
New York approves war vets
bonus of four hundred million dol
lars.
Railroads are planning thru
sleeping cars from coast to coast.
US Senator Wherry of Nebr
told the Nebr. State Republican
convention in Omaha that the
Truman administration does not
understand the foreign policy.
Suzanne Froediere, the Milwa
ukee heiress was released by the
police of Detroit on March 19.
The Westinghouse Electric Co.
of NY made their first wage pro
posal since the strike started on
Jan- 15.
Ex-President Hoover said that
he hopes to ship 13 million tons
of food to hungry Europe by July
1946.
B ishop Frank j. Haas of Grand
Rapids, Mich., said the Soviet dic
tatorship was a policy of untruth
fulness and deception on March
19th.
Behind the Play
BY DON DELEIGHBUR
WOMEN’S BOWLING
CONGRESS BARS CHINESE
AMERICANS, NEGROES
New York—Roger Treat, liberal
sports scribe of the Washington
(D, C.) Daily News, recently took
the Women’s International Bow
ling Congress over the barrel for
its unholy fellowship with the Wa
shington chapter of the AAU on
the race question. Treat, writing
in his column This Is On Me' de
scribed how a Chinese-American
girls’ bowling team was barred
from league competition by the
MIBC and told it could not bowl
because the members are not of
the Caucasian race. This action
took place, Treat said, after 16
weeks of league competition, and
after enrollment ffees had been
accepted by the Wr6men’s Interna
tional Bowling Congress.
Treat made a parallel of the
bowling story with the Washing
ton chapter of the AAU and its
ridiculous program of barring Ne
gro boxers, even though they are
members of the AAU. (This sit
uation has reached another stage
9Wverein the District Court of Ap
peal# rilled that the AAU is pur
suing # wrong course).
The Chinese girls, Treat stated,
have appealed to the Chinese con
sul general, and their appeal will
doubtelss result in the receipt of
a double talk answer from some
member of our State Departments
ranks who will try to appease the
girls with a basket full of high
toned, meaningless words dres
sed in the usual striped pants gib
berish. But the disgraceful action
of the Women’s Bowling Congress
has created a smelly mess that
just cannot be excused or condon
ed. Not in this country.
The members of the barred, the
TENANTS CAN INSURE COTTON CROP
—USDA Photo by Forsythe.
Dr. W. H. Jernagin of the Fraternal Council of Negro Churches is shown
asking James P. Davis, right, of the U. S. Department of Agriculture whether
or not tenants and sharecroppers, as well as owners, can insure their cotton
| crop against unavoidable hazards with the Department’s Federal Crop Insur
ance Corporation. Mr. Davis’ reply is yes, and he explains that sharecroppers
can insure their part of a crop whether the landlord insures his part or not.
He adds, however, that the deadline date for insuring the 1946 cotton crop
comes within the next few weeks in most areas. Mr. Davis, who is a mem
| ber of the field staff of the Field Service Branch's Southern Region, and Dr.
, Jernagin are looking at a miniature bale of cotton.
names leave no doubt that they ,
are Chlnese-Americans, a fact
that must have been evident at
the time of their enrollment in
the league, all have husbands,
brothers and other close relatives
in the armed forces- And their
barring is particularly shameful, |
when on the same day, a story was
written by Andy Anderson, a
Scripps-Howard staff writer, tel
ling of the courageous living of
. wme^ cninese-^merican veter
ans in hospitals in another Calif
city.
.ie officials of the Women's In
ternational Bowling Congress have
followed the tactics of our local
AAU by threatening other teams
in the league with a two-year
banning of all members if the
Chinese-American girls continue
-o enroll in the league. It has been t
reported in this column before ana
We repeat now, that one of the
leading members of the local AAU
who believes he is upholding his
public duties as an American by
barring Negro boxers because of
Washington social philosphy of
fe~ed the same threat to this wri
ter.
vVe were discussing the possib
ility of an open amatuer boxing
I tournament without AAU sanction
t the AAU made that necessary,
and were advised by this man that '
any white boxers who participa
ted in such a tournament would
be barred for life for any further
amatuer competition under the
AAU in Washington. We have
been hoping for a long time that
the citizens of Washington would
rouse from their lethargy and de
manjj that the local chapter of the
AAU follow the suggestions of its
own national body, join the policy
of American sports and throw the
bigots out on their ears. If that
should ever happen, this West
Coast story will tell Joseph Aron
off, Dr. O. U. Singer, Winfree P.
Johnson and other members of the
(Washington) AAU who may vote
the same way, where they find
kindred souls, and where the social
philosphy of race hatred will be
appreciated—in the Women’s In
ternational Bowling Congress.
There is no place for it in the
nation’s capital.
What Roger Treat hag said here
is part and parcel of every clear -
thing Negro sports writer's stock
in trade. The point I want to make
however, is that our fight should
be centered in sports on breaking
down racial barriers within, the
framework of sports orgahlgations
MRS. SCHUYLER GIVES
INSIGHT ON INTER MIXES,
| New York—Writ'n<r in the Mar-'
• ch issue of the American Mercury
I .Toseohine Schuyler,, wife of Geo.
S. Schuyler, gives some first hand
views on Interracial marriages;
also some insights on Human Na
ture vs. State Laws.
In recalling her childhood in the
South where she was born, Mrs.
Schuyler states: “Early I had
found out that the deacon of a
local Baptist church, a most re
s vctabl-e man, ha<j had a colored
companion for 20 years with ev
eryone aware of the intimacy. I
knew, too, that an important fam
ily there had numerous colored
“cousins” whom they privately
acknowledged and visited. I knew,
besides, that the same system ex
isted in my own family, with my
father drawing no color line in his
love life, and that my eldest bro
ther, publicly thought to be child
less, had a colored daughter at
tending school outside the state.
So interracial love was not un
kr~ Tm ’n rr» environment.’’
Mr. and Mrs. Schuyler are pro
fessional writers and reside in
N^w York. Their fourteen year
200 IV1U8ICAL COMPOSITIONS
TO HER CREDIT__
PHILIPPA SCHUYLER
old daughter, Philippa Schuyle.
has 200 musical compositions t<
her credit, including a score for a
100-piece symphony, which wa
premiered last year by the Nev
York Philharmonic Symphony O:
chestra.
By Don DeLeighbur
ling with the hest of showlife’s
unemployed back in 1939. has now
advanced to the point where he
has turned down parts in movie3
that would have brought him
around §87,000 had he been in
clined to portray the roles of the
Negro that are beneath the ra
cial dignity. This is part of tne
training of our performers absorb
from Barney Johnson, owner of
the two Cafe Society ventures and
who personally manages several
artists himself
Josephson knows the indignities
to which we are exposed and is
A r --i n r1 1 —tt—i -in t ■ »
naturally against and attempt to
bring the Negro down to a com
mon level. That is a reason why
in the movies you saw of Hazel
Scott, she always appeared as
Miss Hazel Scott and never seen
in an Aunt Dinah situation. The
Tom stuff is strictly taboo in the
Josephson ventures and Josh's
turning down the chances to get
into the movies is part of the gen
eral eucation that Cafe Society ar
tists must acquire
Love
Too Fiery
For Heaven...
Too Rapturous
For Earth!
JOHN PAVNENJ
MAUREEN O’HARA
WILLIAM BENOIX
,n
eifljpfeiital
journey
CINTUKT-rOX J/T
Directed by WALTER LANG • Produced by WALTER MOROSCO^
and this to my way of thinking, |
is a first step. Let’s purge the I
Women’s International Bowling1
Congress, the American Lawn |
Tennis Association, the Golf As-1
sociations, swimming organiza
tions, professional football, bas-)
ketball and baseball leagues and
circuits of anti-race barriers. Onc“
we have opener that door wide,
then we can proceed on to the
other doos which bar the way.
This principle is present in the
AAU controversy over Negro-star
athletes participating in the out
door track and field championship
this June at San Antonio, Texas.
It- happens in this case, however,
that South Texas Association of
the AAU has agreed and invited
all Negro contestants to come and
take part.
The holdouts are contending that
the state of Texas Jim Crows Ne
groes, that discrimination and se
gregation are rife in Texas as it
is elsewhere in the South, and
that unless the AAU or somebody
lifts all Jim Crow laws. (thus
solving the problem, at long last,
in Texas, at least) they would ra
ther stay in the North. But Rome
wasn’t built that way. Suppose
Texas, or San Antonio, did sus
pend anti-Negro laws for one day
in hotels, restaurants, on trolleys,
busses, etc ?
What good would do the Negroes
in Texas ? What good would it i
do the visiting Negro athletes in |
the South for two dalys only ? The
fact must be kept before the eyes
that the main issue in this whole
matter is the fact that Negro ath-1
letes have been invited to take a
part in a track meet involving
white contestants in a southern
state. There is no AAU rule, law 1
or regulation involved here as in
Washington, barring Negroes. .
There are state laws or customs
preventing Negroes from living in
whit} hotels or eating in whtte
; ov.ned restaurants. Aa the NAAC'P
• finally brought the infamous Te
] xas primary Law to the US Sup
1 reme Court whiich voided it. a
similar action might take place
over the social equality regula
tions that now exist in Texas. The
* We wish to Announce i,
| THE OPENING OF THE
| G & J Smoke Shop i;
| 2118 NORTH 24th Street !|
i Everything in the Line of ];
J CIGARS, CIGARETTES, & |
> ' _ SOFT DRINKS
L Jacksori A Coibey, Props. * j
The ALPINE BOOK STORE
Invites You . .
To visit their place and to Browse
around on the leaves of its Thous
ands of Books ajid Magazines to
your Heart’s Content. No Obliga
tion to buy. So Come. The name
again, ALPINE BOOK STORE.
The address, 4606 SOUTH 24TH
STREET.
•STORM ■ SASII |
Paint — Roofing
SUTHERLAND LUMBER CD
2920 ‘L’ St. HA-1200'
Johnson Drug Co.
2306 North 24th
—FREE DELIVERY—
WE 0998
Do You
Feel
NERVOUS
AS A'WITCH’
r On “CERTAIN DAYS”
of the month?
Do female functional monthly dis
turbance* make you feel restless,
nervous, perhaps cranky and, a bit
blue—at such times?
Then try famous Lydia E. Pink
barn's Vegetable Compound to re
lieve such symptoms.1 Pinkham’s
Compound does moke than relieve
such monthly * cramps, headache,!
backache. It also relieves accom
panying weak, tired, nervous feel- |
tngs—of this nature.
Taken throughout the month —
'this great medicine helps«bulld up
resistance against such distress.
Also a fine stomachic tonic!
LYDIA E. PINKHAM’S
TO SVKVEY EL HOPE'S
FOOD HEEDS
Paris, France Radiophoto, Sou
ndphoto—Former President Her
bert Hover (left’) with President
Felix Gouin of France and U- 3.
Ambassadore Jefferson (right)
pictured when Hoover who is Pre
sident Truman's personal repre
sentative on famine emergency
cu.amission for Europe conferred
with French food experts. France
was first stop for our only living
ex-president who is surveying Eli
's needs.
road is ciear in * is instance, v or
where the Women's Boiling Con
Tress bars Chinese-Americans, and
Negroes, too, for that matter, on
a basis of race, creed, color and
national origin, that is strictly or
ganizational and a matter fox
every athlete and fan to fight
against.
Maher-Kelleher
Insurance Agency
Beat Estate, Rentals, Insurance
NOTARY PUBLIC
2424 BRISTOL ST. JA-6261
LIGHTENS dark SKIM
Loosens BLACKHEADS
W atson’s ,
School of
Beauty
Culture
ENROLL NOWl
Terms Can Be Arranged
2511 North 22nd Street
—JA-3974—
HIGHEST PRICES PAID.
for FURNITURE,
RUGS, STOVES
„ “Cull Us First”
NATIONAL tuRNITURE
Company
—AT 1725—
Gross
JEWELRY &
LOAN CO.
phoneJA-4635
formerly at 24th
and Erskine St.
NEW LOCATION—
514 N. 16th ST.
■ *#11 CHECKED
For quick relief from itching caused by eczema,
athlete’s foot, scabies, pimples and other itching
conditions, use pure, cooling, medicated, liquid
D.D.D. PRESCRIPTION. A do, or’s formula.
Greaseless and stainless. Soothes, comforts and
quickly calms intense itching. 35c trial bcttle
proves it, or money back. Don’t suffer. Ask you*
druggist today for O. D. D. PRESCRIPTION.
r
ANGRY
Please don’t be angry at us if you can’t
always get Smith Bros. Cough Drops. Our
output is still restricted. Soon, we hope,
there’ll again be plenty of Smith Brothers...
soothing, delicious. Black or Menthol, 5tf. "" J
. SMITH BROS. GOUGH DROPS
' BLACK OR MENTHOL-5* j