The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, June 24, 1944, Page 2, Image 2

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    NEGRO TROOPS LEND HELPING HAND TO WOUNDED DURING THE INVASION . j
==*-—--- ~ ... . ........ ...--—-I
These U. S. Signal Corps photos
aken on a beachhead in Northern
•'ranee on June 8, show American
Negro soldiers who participated in
he invasion giving assistance to the
wounded Yanks. In photo at left a
Negro soldier lends a hand to another
Amercani by picking bits of metal
from his face. Scenes like this were
common on the beachheads. At right
a Yank wounded during the initial as
sault, against Hitler’s Fortress Eur
—-— •" -—■ .—1 ■ i 1
I FALSTAFF’s
Message of the lleek j
Are you an active woman
With some daily time to spare?
Why not become a Nurses’ Aid
And help in sick bed care!
Your local Red Cross needs you,
What’s more they want you
quick!
Remember girls, helping a nurse \
Will help make Kb tier sick.
._a_
ope is being lifted into an ambulance
for transfer to a field hospital.
*«!*'Iff
NEWS OF WAR PRISONERS
CAN NOW BE OBTAINED
1 HROUGH NEWLY ORGANIZ
ED WAR SUB-COMMITTEE
Relatives and friends of American
prisoners of war and civilian intern
ees can now receive latest information ■
on prisin camp conditions and privil
eges through the newly organized
prisoner of war sub-committee of the ,
Douglas County Chapter of the Red .
C ross.
Under the chairmanship of Mrs.
Frta Whitcomb, the committee will
supply current information on relief
measures taken by the Red Cross tn
behalf of American Nationals held |
by the enemy and on postal and other |
regulations governing communications
with prisoners, Mrs. Whitcomb said.
About 40,000 Americans are now
held by Germany, and Japan; names
cf those from Douglas County wall
be sent to the prisoners of war sub
committee, which will advise their,
next of kin how mail and gifts may
be sent to them.
“We sail do our best to provide
relatives and friends of prisoners
with the most recent and accurate de
velopments concerning prison camp
conditions, relief measures and com
munication regulations,” Mrs. Whit
comb said. “As new information is
received, it will be sent to the next
of-kin by letter and to the World
Our 1943 Taxes...Helping
We're all more "tax-conscious" than ever these
days because we know our Federal tax dollars,
Just like our War Bond dollars, are helping to 1
speed Victory. f
]
'T
Nebraska Power is Omaha's biggest taxpayer.
That means it is the largest contributor to the
support of Omaha's schools, parks, fire and
5Vr..
police departments and other vital civic ac
tivities, as well as to Uncle Sam's treasury.
We're paying the biggest taxes in our history
these days (109% more than we paid just ten
years ago), but like all good citizens we're
f glad to carry our part of the bill we must
foot for Freedom.
NEBRASKA POWER COMPANY
Good Service Low Rates
Herald for publication. We will al
so be glad to consult with relatives
and friends of prisoners of war and
advise them in any way possible.”
The new sub-committee wrill func
tion as a part of the Red Cross home
service program for servicemen a.id
their families. Working with Mrs.
Whitcomb are Dr. Frederick W.
Clayton, Rabbi Davd Goildstein, Miss
Leota Norton, Director, and Mrs.
Sarah Waechter. staff _member o?
the Red Cross Home Service Depart
ment.
NEGRO PUBLISHERS CLOSE
NEW YORK CONVENTION
ONE HUNDRED DELEGATES
ATTEND: WIRE SENATORS
FOR FEPC PASSAGE
—By Billy Watkins—
New York (Press Photo New'S Ser
vice)—A general program aimed at
raising the standards of America’s
influential Negro press by rejecting
fraudulent advertising and taking ‘dol
lar mark implications’ out of the news
was underway this week following
the Negro Newspaper Publishers’ As
sociation’s fifth annual Convention.
More than 100 delegates, represent
ing every important Negro publicat
ion in the country, attended the NN
| PA's Convention which ended Sun
day after a four days of discussion
and planning. Sessions were, held at
the Harlem YMCA.
C. C. Galloway, editor of this pap
er attended the Convention and is now
enroute home.
The program to eliminate the ad
vertisement of luck charms, magic
pills, salve to "make the skin white”
and other phony advertsing copy that
caters to the gullible and superstitious
was characterized as "a big step for
ward in the right direction” by John
H. Sengestacke, president of the N
NPA and publisher of the Chicago
Defender.
State Athletic Commissioner C. B.
Powell, publisher of the Amsterdam
News, told delegates that he cut
fraudulent advertising out of his
newspaper two years ago. "If we
catch it in time,” Dr. Powell said,
“we reject it flatly. We lose about
1 $25,000 a year in business in doing so
MR. AND MRS. CRAIG,—
are Happy to Announce that
MRS. GERALDINE CRAIG IS OPENING A
Grill & Sandwich Shop
IN HER COZY LITTLE HOME
Saturday, June 17, —4 p. m. at 2615 N. 24th St.
OPEN FROM 4 P. M. TO 4 A. M.
CALL FOR RESERVATIONS—JA. 4336
_
._ ... ..... _.. ...
LADIES "ov::?"
JOIN THE U. S. CADET NURSING CORPS.
Free education, snappy nurse’s uniform, your
complete tuition, room and board, and a
regular allowance of $13 to at least $30 a
month will be furnished.
For information about all nursing schools writet
U. S. CADET NURSE CORPS SOX 68 NEW YORK, N. V.
dSBOHM
I JIM’S Place ;
I -2701 “Q” Street- |
I LIQUOR BEER WINE AND LUNCH |
I We buy the best that can be obtained for your 1
§ approval. We appreciate your patronage with 1
i prompt, courteous service to all, at all times. *
THE OMAHA GUIDE
A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
Published Every Saturday at 2420 Grant Street (
OMAHA. NEBRASKA—PHONE HA. 0800
Entered as Second Class Matter March 15, 1927 '
at the Post Office at Omaha, Nebraska, under 1
Act of Congress of March 3, 1879.
_
i
C. C. Galloway_Publisher and Acting Editor 1
- I
|
SUBSCRIPTION RATE IN OMAHA I
ONE TEAR — — — _ _ $3.00 1
SIX MONTHS — — — — $1.75 ]
THREE MONTHS - — — — $l.?5 i
SUBSCRIPTION RATE OUT OF TOWN
ONE YEAR — — — — — $3.60
SIX MONTHS — — — — — $2.00
All News Copy of Churches and all organiz
ations must be in our office not later than 1:00
p. m. Monday for current Issue, All Advertis
i ing Copy on Paid Articles not later than Wed
' nesday noon, proceeding date of issufe, to Insure
publication.
Nati mal Advertising Representative:—
INTERSTATE UNITED NEWSPAPERS, INC.,
545 Fifth Avenue, New York City, Phone
MU'.ray Hill 2-5452, Ray Peck, Manager.
' TIRED OF
=- : ■ - ■ =r — .... =-" . " - .^- -
but I am confident that it is for the
best interests of iur group to do this.’
Dollar mark implications in the
news received equally as hard a blow
when William G. (Bill) Nunn, man
aging editor of the Pittsburgh Cour
ier, criticized by inference the policy
of running paid for publicity as news.
"We've got to place more emphas
is on good, objective reporting,” Mr.
Nunn told delegates attending a pan
el discussion for editors and special
feature writers, "because our readers
are entitled to the best.”
New methods in circulation and
promotion were emphasized to the
delegates by members of the comm
ittee which sponsored a section of the
panel on business.
Alexander Barnes, chairman of the
committee and publisher of the Wash
ington Tribune, recommended that
Negro newspaper owners stabilize the
wholesale price of papers, hold a Na
tional Newsboy Day each year and
set up a central agency to promote
the sale of all Negro newspapers.
Others serving on the committee
with Mr. Barnes were James Mur
phy of the Afro-American; E. F.
Corbett, of the Journal and Guide,
Arthur Morrs of tihe Courier and'
Harry Alexander of the Cleveland
Call and Post.
WHITE STUDENTS FAVOR
ADMISSION OF NEGROES TO
MISSOURI UNIVERSITY
Columbia, Mo., June 23 (ANP1—
White students of the University of
Missouri last week voiced their ap
proval of th • admission of Negroes
to the state-financed institution thru
a p.dl conducted under the sponsor
ship of the minorities commission of
the Morter Board Postwar Planning
committee.
Of the total of 360 expressing an
opinion, 61.6 percent favored the ad
mission of Negroes as regulu stu-1
ents, 22.5 percent were opposed 6 6
percent favored admission of profes
sional schools only, 318 percent favor
ed admission of Ndgroes to gradual ' i
school only, and 5.5 percent favored
admission of Negroes to both profes
sional and graduate schools
Formed only a month ago, the
commission is composed of student'
mi die university and has sp msor.'d
everal educational activities on the
•vcial problem since then. It distrib
•. <rl cop-es of “The Races of Mar
---—.
MILDRED’S
Sandwich
SHOP
2409 Lake St. JA-0836
“A Clean Place to EAT at
MILDRED’S”
HOT BAR B-QUE, CHICKEN,
FISH AND CHITTERLINGS.
' “Patronizing Us is like making
Love to A ‘Widow’."
“You Can't Overdo It.”
- --- - ----—J
. k'nd,” a boo.; writen by two Columbia
| ui 'versify anthopologists and sponsor
ed the showing of the “The Negro
Soldier”, a War Department film.
Students were given an opportunity
to express their views at the forum
in Jesse auditorium. The ca (■'. of
L.ryd L. Gaines and Lucile Th.fcrd,
two coolred students that have public
ised the state’s jim crow bar ‘ess r.»
the University of Missouri, wcr*- dis
citsied by Miss Patricia Hoyeider,
•otnmission chairman and A ui-'Vl
Horn.
According to the poll. 76 p2.«.ent
of the out-of-state students favored
the admission of Negroes; cf the
Missouri students polled, 72.7 pe.ccuv
T. cored admission. While onw 'i.H
percent of the students memie's cf
i'identities favored the admission ot
' eg-oes, 79,8 percent of the :ntlep:i’
cent students concurred. Of those
BUY YOUR 1
POULTRY I
AT THE
NEBRASKA PRODUCE
2204-6 NORTH 24th ST.
Get the Best in Quality at the
NEBRASKA PRODUCE
—LOWEST PRICE—
| Phone WE. 4137
Banish Your
GRAY HAIR
Blues
Look Years Younger
Color Your Hair This Easy Way
To give your hair new, rich,
natural-looking color (black,
brown, blonde) start using Gode
froy’s Larieuse Hair Coloring
NOW . . . Acts quickly—goes on
evenly, easily—won’t rub off or
wash out—unaffected by heat—
permits permanents and stylish
hairdos ... Known and used for
45 years. Your dealer will give
your money back if you’re not
100% satisfied.
If your dealer
doesn't have
Larieuse <
(LARRY
USE) send
$1.25 direct to
. . Godefroy
Mfg.Co. 3510
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2041 ^
OODKVBOri
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HAIR COLORING
CAUTION: USE ONLY AS DIRECTED ON IA6EI
students questioned who live In rural
ureas, or towns less than 2,500 popu
:a' -on, 77.2 percent favored admissii it
• f Negroes and 72 percent of Th,>e
students who live in un an are is were
of a similar (pinion.
mmamm- *\
Ir--.. . -.
We Render_
j The type of service requested
■ regardless of creed or organis
| ation, so when the time for re
] membering comes it will bring
only solace and consolation that
the loved one ivas laid to rest
I with a dignified and gracious kind
of funeral service,—priced within
the family’s means.
Romas’
FUNERAL HOME
2022 Lake St. WE. 2022
—. ,'."1
I Army Shoes
All Sizes for SALE
CHEAP!!!
LAKE SHOE
SERVICE
2407 Lake Street
]. L. TAY LOR, Proprietor
^ ^ - - ■
If You Had MYJOB
Keeping house, helping
take care of the family—you
would realize that business girls
are not the only ones who some
times get Headache and Tired
Aching Muscles. We home girls
often work just as hard and have
just as many Headaches, just a3
many Stomach Upsets and get
just as Tired.
About a year ago, I first used
ALKA-SELTZER
I find that it eases my Aching
Head, takes the kinks out of Tired,
Aching Muscles and brings relief
when I have Acid Indigestion.
The family says I am a lot
easier to live with since I have
known about Alka-Seltzer.
*Have you tried ALKA-SELT
ZER? If not, why don’t you get
a package today? Large package
60*. Small package 30*, also by
the glass at Soda Fountains. *