The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, September 25, 1943, City Edition, Image 1

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    LARGEST ACCREDITED NEGRO NEWSPAPER WEST OF CHICAGO AND NORTH OF KANSAS CITY —MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED NEGRO PRESS
=r:.. ---■- — ... 1 -.■■■.- ..— - ----- ■ - , ___ ^
nSNebr"‘“ Saturday, Sept. 25, 1943 OUR 16th YEAR-No. 33 City Edition, 5c Copy
L^crion
Sidelites
(BY JULIUS E. HILL)
New Member
of Theo.Post
LT. WILLA B. BROWN
Before an audience that taxed
the capacity of the Mirror Lounge
Lieutenant WlUa B. Brown was
made a member of Theodore Roose
velt Post No. 30 at 11:30 p. m.
Tuesday night. Sept 21st This
honor was bestowed upon her by
Commander J. C. Carey, who pre
sented her with a membership
card amid thunderous applaune
from those present. This world
famous aviatrix accepted the card
graciously, with the same lovely
personality she has shown since
she «?rived_tn tout. ... . ... %
I RGES MORE AIR MINDNESS
In her address at St. John's
Church, Wednesday evening.
Sept. 22nd, Lt. Wills B. Brown
stressed the need for more air.
mindness among members of
our group. She stated that af
ter the war as now, there will
be a great need for pilots and
airplane mechanics, as aviation
will be more in evidence com
mercially.
(A more comprehensive account
of her address will appear in
this paper next week.)
Legion Buys Jewell Bldg
The Roosevelt Post has
acquirtd another piece of
property—the Jewell bldg
at 24th and Grant St.
*****
MRS. R. E. REESE ON THE JOB
Mrs. Russell E. Reese, Direo.tr'ss
of the North Side USO.. also a
member of the A.W.U.S, with Mrs.
Leonard, sold Saving Stamps at the
Legion Post (Roosevelt) during
their Convention.
*****
AUXILIARY GETS SPECIAL
CITATION—
As with the Post, so with the
Auxiliary. Roosevelt Post, as has
been published in this paper, is in
permanent possession of the Spaf
ford Trophy for having the larg
est percentage gain in membership
over a period of three consecutive
years. With it in their possession
of course, its auxiliary couldn’t
win it, but they DID win a citation.
You just can't keep persons belong
ing to this post down! Below is
the exact wording on the citation:
AWARDED TO THE UNIT BY
THE AMERICAN LEGION AUX
ILIARY DEPARTMENT OF
NEBRASKA FOR OUTSTAND
ING SERVICE IN FURTHER
ING THE 1944 MEMBERSHIP
PROGRAM IN HARMONY WITH
THE MEMBERSHIP KEYNOTE.
DEDICATION TO GOD
AND COUNTRY
And the ladles of the Auxiliary
wants it to be known that they
haven't really got started yet!
» ♦ ♦ ♦ *
ALLOWED TO DANCE
Monday evening, Sept. 20th, the
Post let down its hair (so to speak)
and allowed the jitterbugs to do
their stuff in the Lounge, because
it was Convention Week. They
really did their stuff in a big way.
And to put it in the words of a
popular song—We don’t know how
they did it, but they did it?
They will be allowed to dance
(Continued on page£?»=4)
- ' '■ ' I... . ■ "■ \
Bayard Ruslin to Speak at Downtown F. W. L. A.
4We MUST MOT Fail Nebraska!!?* Buy another Bond l\ow,
Sc
Worth
ot GoodRectdin
Bishop, Mrs.
ISioah 7.
Williams,
Honored at
Reception
The Pastor, Rev. E. F. Ridley,
Officers, and members of St. John
African Methodist Episcopal
church held a invitational recep
tion Friday evening, September 24.
at 8:30 o’clock, honoring Bishop
and Mrs. Noah Wellington Wil
liams. at the church at 22nd and
Willis avenue. Door cards were
presented for reserved seats.
Soldiers and
Paul Robeson !
To Appear with
London Symphony
London, England—The ears of
the world will be turned towards
London’s famous Royal Albert Hall
on September 28 and 29, when the
voices of some 200 American Ne
gro soldiers fill the air in the first
concert of Its kind evr held in the
Sponsored by Lord Beaverbrooks
British empire.
“Daily Express" in cooperation
with the Army’s European Theatre
Headquarters, the concert will also
feature Roland Hayes, distinguish
ed America ntenor, and the London
Symphony Orchestra.
In attendance at the concert will
be high ranking empire officials
an dmany foreign dignitaries. The
concert will be broadcast by the
British Broadcasting Company and
the National Broadcasting Comp
any which have agreed to make
selections from the concert avail
able to listeners throughout thg
world.
1111 . .. _~
Subscribe Today!
COL. BENJ. A. DAVIS, JR.
FAMILY ALLOWANCES
KEEI* MEN’S MORALE HII.H
SAYS’COL. DAVIS
Newark, N. J. Sept. 22—Lt. Col.
Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., one of the
heroes of tjie. Sicilian Campaign,
and organizer and first command
ing officer of the famous all-Negrc
Figmer squadron, brought word to
Newark that a big lactor in the
high morale of the men at the
front is the knowledge that their
families are receiving their family
allowances and allotments of pay
regularly each month.
Colonel Davis has returned to
employ his battle experience in
training a larger fighter group. (
Stopping in for a visit at the War
Department Office of Dependency
Benefits to authorize an increase
llotment of pay to his wile,
VIrs. Agatha S. Davis of 97 Carmel
St., New Haven, Conn. Colonel Da
vis declared that “the efficiency of
our men in the service, is a major
factor in the high morale which
prevails.’’
Colonel Davis is the son of Brig.
General Benjamin O. Davis, now
in Washington. He was
graduated from W'est Point in
t Continued on page 2)
Chicken Coop housing—
- -
These are Quakertown. Pennsyl- j
vannia chicken coops in which,mi- I
grant tomato pickers must live
with their families. Some of the
6
FLORIDA FARM FOLK CRAMM
ED IN PENNY. HENCOOPS MAY
HAVE TO ocrr FARM BEFORE
TRIAL OF EMPLOYER CHARG
ED WITH DEATH OF TWO
MIGRANT WORKERS
Quakertown. Pa.—When the trial
of E. O. Mastin .tomato farm own
er, her*" in wohse barn two migrant
workers were burned to death last
August 17. begins next month, the
tomato harvest will be over and
most of the impoverished farm
hands which he imported from
Florida will have moved away in
order to continue to make a living.
XAACP lawyers said this week.
With these witnesses gone chances
for a conviction lessen.
At a coroner’s hearing at Quak
ertown on August 27 the coroner’s
jury held Mastin responsible for
the deaths of Willis Cooper and
I Mrs. Odell May. Cooper and Mrs.
coops, the largest of which is a
bout seven feet square and five
feet high, -are housing families
with as many as five members.
I
May were trapped in a crowd ?d
barn in which several families liv
ed on the Mastin farm. There
were no fire escapes and only one
exit.
A. ^investigation of the case by *
John Grantham, president of the
Lehigh Valley branch NAACP here
had revealed that the workers on
the Mastin farm lives almost in
the state of peonage.
Most of these workers, who were
brought here from Florido to pick
tomatoes which are sold to the
government through the Campbell
Soup Company, are housed with
their families in tiny chicken coops
filthy and unfit for human habit
aton. Although dissatisfied with
living conditions, the workers
claim they have been unable to
earn enough money to leave the
farm.
###»########»#####»#######»#####»
I TEXT OF SERMON OF ST. PHILIP’S CHURCH ON
THEIR GOLDEN JUBILEE OF THE CONSECRATION AND THE
65th ANNIVERSARY OF THE FOUNDING OF THE PARISH, DE
% LIVERED BY THE REV. FR. S. J. MARTIN.
Honor Memory of The Late
Father John A. Williams
SERMON PREACHED (
in
St. Philip’s Church, Omaha,
on the
Golden Jubilee
of the
Consecration
and the
Sixty-Fifth Anniversary
of the
Founding of the Parish
by
The Rev. Fr. S. J. Martin,
Rector of
St. Edmund's Church, Chicago
12th Sunday After Trinity
“ANNIVERSARY SERMIN”
We come this morning to cele
brate a very solemn and pleasant
occasion.. Solemn because we are
mindful that we are in the pres
ence of God and have been charg
I ed with responsibilities—pleasant
because not withstanding our short
comings God has been gracious
unto us. I have been thinking of
one of the most important inci
dents in the life of the Blessed
Mother. It was a day of great
celebration, a day of remembrance,
a day o fthanksgiving. Wwhen
ever a child was born to a Jewish
.mother, it was required in the law
that she should go to the Temple
and there present her offering and
fee Purified. It was not merely a
time of pomp and outward show
but a day of deep significance.—a
time when the mother offered her
child to God. It was an occasion
on which the Jewish Church sought
to impress upon every mother—a
day that they should never forget.
It is so easy to forget but hard to
remember... There are many things
we like to forget—we strive so
hard to forget and yet we can’t
forget.. I imagine Judas who be
trayed Our Lord tried to put that
awful act out of his memory—
but he could not bear it—to think
I have betrayed innocent blood.
The very thought of it caused him
to go out and hang himself... Peter
denied Our Lord and went on his
carefree way, not realizing, not
remembering that Our Lord had
said to him. “Before the cock crows,
thou sholl deny Me thrice.” The
cock crew and Peter remembered
and he wept bitterly.. The words
of the Psalmist are touching, “If
I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let
my right hand forget her cunning,
If I do not remember thee, let
my tongue cleave to the roof of
my mouth. If I prefer not Jeru
salem above my chief joy.” And
the most mystical experience of
all is certainly to share in the
great Service of the Altar when
we recall—remember that it was ]
in a little upper room with twelve
men that the Saviour of the World
took common bread—broke it. took
ordinary wine—blessed it, gave it
to them and said, “As often as I
you remember and do not forget:
you show forth My Death.” ..So |
we have been asked to remember. I
1 know that there are mvstical and
imponderable, difficulties we can’t <
understand. Why is it that we have
been endowed with the gift of1
memory?. Is it a gift or a curse?
St. Paul cries out, ”0 wretched
man that I am. who can deliver
me from this death?” “Out. damn
ed spot, out.” . ’’Wash me thor
oughly fropi my wickedness and
cleanse me from my sins.” ..We
want to recall the lovely, the beau
tiful, the pleasant, but the unpleas
ant and the evil we want to forget.
Anne Proctor tried to work it out:
“'Seated one day at the organ.
I was weary and ill at ease.
And my fingers wandered idly
Over the noisy keys.
I do not know what I was playing.
Or what I was dreaming then;
But I struck one chord of music
Like the sound of a great Amen.1
It flooded the crimson twilight
Like the close of an angel's
psalm.
And it lay on my fevered spirit
With a touch of infinite calm.
It quieted pain and sorrow,
Like love overcoming strife.
It seemed the harmonious echo
From our discordant life.
It linked all perplexed meanings
Into one perfect peace.
And trembled away into silence.
As if it were loath to cease.
I have sought, but I seek it vainly.
That one lost chord divine,
That came from the soul of the or
gan
And entered into mine.
It may be that Death’s bright aneel
Will speak in that chorff again.
It may be that only in heaven
Crucifix ... memorial to Father William*
I shall hear that grand Amen.”
The woman who came to anoint
Our Lord’s Feet with precious oint
ment was confronted with this
problem. Judas found fault with
her. It would have been better
to have sold the ointment and given
the proceeds to the poor. Accord
ing to political economy, Judas was
right. Matthew tells us that the
other Disciples agreed with him
and were indignant at the waste.
They wanted to know, “To what
purpose is this waste?” Yes, the
ointment was wasted if everything
is wasted which does not produce
a useful, outward result. If noth
ing is useful which cannot be
weighed, evaluated, tabulated and
put into statistical tables then this
action is wasteful. But, if that is
good which feeds the mind and
heart, which strengthens the soul,
—if affection is useful and senti
ment is useful—if man does not
live by bread alone but by every
M ord that proceeds out of the
mouth of God. the ointment was
not wasted but put to its highest
possible use. This woman did not
forget—she remembered. She gave
her precious ointment as a memo
rial. She did what she could. She
wanted to keep forever in her heart
and memory the fact that she an
ointed the Feet of the Blessed
Master with the most precious
thing she had—an alabaster box
of precious ointment. Is this not
the meaning of this day? The
presentation of our gifts, the offer
ing up of our memorials—our souls
and bodies to be a reasonable, holy,
and living sacrifice.
There are people here this morn
ing I know, who are able to share I
in this great service. It is not me
chanical. They are those who. no
doubt, have not forgotten the
Saintly Dean of Trinity Cathedral
who made it possible for this mis
sion to come into being. We can
not forget the late Bishop Worth
ington who wa sresponsible for the
formal organization of this work.
This goes back to 1878. The Rever
end Father John Williams, Jere
miah Reed. Cvrus Bell, William R.
Gamble in 1891. 1892. This pres
ent building was erected and con:
secrated by Bishop Worthington on
April 21. 1893. This church is an
alabaster box of precious oint
ment. A memorial given by the
wife of Bishop Worthington in
memory of her dear mother.
Amelia. In_1879 a young colored
man was ordained a Deacon and
became Priest-in-charge, then, in
1891 came that Saintly man John
Albert Williams. In 1882 a por
tion of the temporary structure
used for the Cathedral was given
to this parish and was moved to
19th and Cuming streets, where it
remained until 1890. In 1890 it
was removed to this present site!
and Bishop Worthington laid the
Corner Stone on September 21,
1892. In 1926 your Mission became
a Parish with the Reverend Father [
Victor Holley, grandson of Bishop
Holley of Haiti, became your Rec
tor. Then came Father Wright
who remained w-ith you a very
short time, having been called to
his reward. Your present Rector
came in October, 1938. Since his
coming the whole church has been
completely renovated, the base-j
ment and heating plant remodeled, i
a new kitchen and guild rooms have J
been installed, a new Chapel has
) NOTED NEGRO FIELD SECY
OF FELLOWSHIP OF
RECONCILIATION HERE
SEPT 28TH —7 O’CLOCK
Bayard Rustin, National Field
conciliation, will speak at a meet
Secretary for the Fellowship of Re
ing to be held at the YWCA., 17th
and St. May's Ave., on Tuesday
evening, Sept. 28th at 700 o’clock.
Mr. Rustin, a Negro has worked
with the American Friends Serv
ice Committee in this country and
in Puerto Rico, and the past two
years has been traveling over the
United States gathering data about
the American Negro and conditions
affecting him He is a dynamic
speaker and has definite facts and
figures to give. There will be time
allotted for discussion after his
talk. The meeting is open to the
public.
BAYARD RUSTIN' was born in
West Chester, Pa. After some
travel abroad ,he returned to pub
lic school in West Chester where
he participated extra-cuiricula*1
activities, winning major letters in
football .track, tennis, singing and
speaking. He was graduated from
high school with scolastic and act
ivitieh honors.
After high school he attended
Chayney State Teachers College,
Wilberforce University and the
City College of New York.
He spent several summers in the
Student Peace Service and Work
Camp program of the American i
Friends Service Committee. Dur- ■
ing the summer of 1941, he worked :
with the Friends1 Camp in Puerto
Rico where 12 students from Am
erican colleges, working without
pay assisted Puerto Ricans in build
ing a school in one of the under
privileged areas. Since 1941 he fcas
been a field secretary with the ft 1
lowship of Reconciliation. He nas
been most concerned to explore the
Candhian technique for winning
freedom and overcoming injustic
es. He has attempted to apply this
knowledge to the American Ne
wo’s struggle for better jobs, hous
ing, education and doing away'with
discrimination.
been built, and the Altar remod
eled. He has been upheld by the
mystical experience of those who
have entered here and gone on.
Only one of the clergy is alive to
day who was present on that mem
orable occasion—The Right Rever
end Irrm P. Johnson, retired. Bish
op of Colorado. On that afternoon
twelve persons were confirmed and
I believe that five of them are liv
ing today, Leonard and Edward
Gamble, Lillian Cox. Delcia Good
child, and Ellsworth Pryor.
But we have still today people I
who are asking, “Why the waste
of this precious ointment?” What
of the sick and the poor? What
about the world torn with strife
and racial conflict? Why spend
money for music when the world
is starving? How can your Priest
stand before the Altar in costly
Vestments w-hen the world is crack
ing up? Can God be pleased with
ritual and ceremony when children
are underfed and ill housed? Our
Lord said to those Disciples, “You
do not understand this mystical
gift of memory. You can only see
the present. You understand the
thing from a standpoint of weight,
tabulations, statistical tables, out
ward results, but you will learn
as you know more of me and are
with me longer that man cannot
live by bread alone.”
I remember when I was a stu
dent in college in Boston, I would
walk down Tremont Street and
gaze upon carved statues of gran
ite that cost thousands of dollars.
In that wonderful horticultural
hall there it seemed to me that the
building would have answered the
same purpose without these stat
ues. The amount which they cost
would have provided a comfortable
home for a number of persons who
were living in cellars and were ex
posed to disease. According to
political economy it was a waste
to put those statues there but
every poor man in Boston is a
little better, every child that lives 1
loday!
Telegram Sent to All County
Chairmen:_
"Nebraska stands forty-sixth
with only 3fi percent of its Third
War Loan Bond Quota sold. The
time is half gone. Nebraska never
has and MUST NOT FAIL in main
taining its sector of the Battlefront.
The present crisis necessitates your
using sufficiently resourceful and
aggressive methods In canvassing
or recanvassing every individual
and eligible concern in order that
you will meet your quota and that
the price our boys are paying in
Italy and the Pacific will not be in
vain,
W. DALE CLARK,
State Chairman War
Finance Committee"
AN EDITORIAL FROM THE
OMAHA WORLD HERALD
“As these lines are written com
es word that the state of Nebraska
now stands forty-sixh among the
50 divisions (the states, including
California, in two parts, and the
District of Columbia) in the sale of
war bonds, relative to quota.
“That does not sound like Xeb
1 raska.
“That ,we venture to say is NOT
Nebraska.
“It is simply an accident of the
reports. Other states made their
returns faster, or completed their
solicitations earlier. Nebraska nev
er was and please God never will
be as far down he list as that in
any patriotic activity. Nebraska ■*
is habitually at the top or very
near thereto.
“But the word from Washington,
as of September 18, should convey
a warning to us nevertheless. It
is time for all of us to get busy.
To turn in our contributions (and
double them if we can). To do
energetically and at once whatev
er tasks have been assigned to us
in connection with the campaign.
“For Nebraska must not fail.
America must not fail. We, the
people, must not fail our sons.”
LEON J. MARKHAM,
Executive Manager,
War Finance Committee
ELKS BOND 'CHIEF
Lt. Geo. W. Lee, Memphis, Teniu,
author, business man, and civic
leader, who, as National Chairman
of the Elks War Bond Committee,
has set the fraternity’s Third War
Loan goal at $5,000,000; and re
ports steady progress through his
six regional chairmen.
in a cellar is a little happier be.
cause besides cold brick walls there
is something to please the eye and
fill the heart. Even the bootblack
of the street does not live by bread
alone. God must have approved
(Continued next week*
FEPC. Meet — on RR Hearings
Washington. DC.—The long a
waited investigation of discrimin
ation in the railroad industry got
under way Wednesday. Bartley C.
Crum .chief FEPC counsel outlin
ed the committee’s case. Bartley’s
statement, forthright and pertinent
defended he commitee's investiga
tion of discrimination in the rail
industry durng the “crisis period of
our national war effort’’ with the
remark that it was Its firm con
viction that his issue must be fac
ed during the war. Outlining the
objective of the rail probe. Crum
stated its sole purpose is to afford
"equality of job opportunity for
all, regardless of race, creed or col
or.’’ Crum concluded with the in
spiring assertion that "in doing
justice to the Negro railroad work
er today we shall both serve the
practical war needs and eliminate
the evid of bigotry and discrimin
ation at home and give heart to
the peoples of Europe .and Asia.
Shown seated around the counfer
enee table are: Miss Sara Southall
Supervisor of Employment and
Service, international Harvester
Company. Chicago: P. B. Young,
Sr., publisher, Norfolk, Va., Jour
nal and Guide; Samuel Zemurray
President, United Fruit Company,
New Orleans, La.; Malcolm Ross,
assistant to the chairman; Rt. Rev.
Monsignor Francis J. Haas. Chair
man; George Johnson .chief inves
tigator; John Brophy of the Con
gress of Industrial Organizations;
Milton P. Webster. Internat.onal
Vice President, Brotherhood of
Sleeping Car Porters. Chicago; and
Boris Shiskin .American Federation
of Labor. Washington. DC.
(Press Photo Service)