The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, February 20, 1943, City Edition, Image 1

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A KOI ST ACCREDITED NEGRO NEWSPAPER WEST OF CHICAGO AND NORTH of K ANSAS CITY —MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED NEGRO PRESS
.^bSS,??££"&•.^F' N'br“k* Saturday, Feb. 20,1943 Our 16th Year, No. 2 City Edition, 5c Copy
~ - - — ~ ' - -' ■ ■ ' ' - - ^ ' —
KEEP- EM ROLLIN-ALONG
w,.™ iT n /ADf . ... . _ By Bureau of Public Relation*. U. S. War Dept.. W**h.. D. O.
WAACS AT WORK—Auxiliaries Ruth Wade of Detroit, Mich., and Lucille Mayo (left to right
demonstrate their ability to service trucks as taught them during the training period at Fort Dei
Koines and put into practice at Fort Huachuca, Ariz.
Defends Color Issue
In Dean Pickens Case
PULLMAN EMPLOYES RETURN $110,000
IN LOST CASH, JEWELRY IN 1942
CHICAGO. Feb. 17 (ANP)—Pull
man Porters and car service em
ployes had their long-time reputa
tion for honesty boosted again last
week with the announcement tb;?
during more than $80.00 if>
cash end $30,000 in jewelry, mislaid
and lorgotten in Pullmans by sold
iers end civilians, was restored to
owners by the company.
Total valu? of the $100,000 items
of personal property, exclusive of
c^sh and jewelry, that was restored
in 1942 to customers through the
lost •'••Ed found department of th3
Pullman company amounted to “sev
eral hundred thousand dollars", it
was estimated. A careful record
is kept of property lost and turned
in. end in each case a merit cita
tion is made on the individual em
ploye’s sendee record.
FATHER GIVES 12 SONS TO ARMED FORCES
HARTSVILLE, S. C„ Feb. 17 (AK
P)—Richard Xicholson, 58 year old
I>ai Lngton county farmer, says his
12 sons. Andrew, Dan. Raymond.
Pies, Bill. Geaham, Fred, Dock Will
I Ezekiel and Isaac, are all serving
in the armed forces. Xichol3on
says he has 12 other children.
“FAILING IN RESPONSIBILITY TO MINORITY GROUPS”
FOOD RATIONING
POINT PLAN MARCH!
Declaration of excess stocks of
commercially canned and proessed
foods on nand as oi February 21J
1943. and for excess coffee on hand
as of November 28, 1942. in order
to obtain War Ration Book Two,
will lie made by means of the Con
sumer Declaration form released
M 3a;.s:in m vm i • aua «an 1
Marriage Reception
Mr. John Albert Smith will nun
ounce the marriage of his daughter ,
Celestine Alberta to Mr. Marcellus
Allen Ransom at a invitational re
ception to be held Sunday evening,
February 2S, 1943 from 5 until 8
o'clock at 2631 Grant Street.
—.. -1 ■ ■ •
this week by the Office of Price Ad
ministration.
Registration of everyone who is
eligible for War Ration Book Two
will begin during the week of Feb
ruary 22. Actual rationing will lie
gin on March 1,
In addition to presenting War Ra
tion Book One.. ..the sugar, coffee
and shoe book_..at the registrat
ion site, it will be necessary for
some responsible member of the
family to'fill out and sign the Con
sumer Declaration for all the fam
ily. The Declaration asks for the
excess amounts of coffee on hand
as of November 28, 1942, when cof
fee rationing started, and of ex
cess canned goods on hand as of
OPA Form No. R-1301
United states of America
OFFICE OF
PRICE ADMINISTRATION
Form Approved. Budget Bureau No. 06-R126-42
One copy of this Declaration must be filed
with the Office of Price Administration by
each person applying for War Ration Book
Two for the members of a family unit, and
by each person who is not a member of a
family unit. File at the site designated.
Coupons will be deducted for excess supplies
of the foods listed below according to the
schedules announced by the Office of Price
Administration.
CONSUMER DECLARATION _
Processed Foods and Coffee
— - -1
I HEREBY' CERTIFY' that I am authorized to apply for and receive
a B ar Ration Book Two for each person listed below who is a
member of my family unit, or the other person or persons
for whom I am acting whose War Ration Book One I have
submitted to the Board;
That the name of each person and number of his or her JTar
Ration Book (hie are accurately listed below;
That none of these persons is confined or resident in an institu
tion, or is a member of the Armed Forces receiving subsist
ence in kind or eating in separate messes under an officer’s
command;
That no other application for IT ar Ration Book Two for these
persons has been made;
That the following inventory statements are true and include
all indicated foods owned by all persons included in this
Declaration:
Co Wee
1. Pounds of coffee owned on November 28, 1942,
minus 1 pound for each person included in this
Declaration whose age as stated on War Ration
Book One is 14 years or older. ..... _ ,
2. Number of persons included in this
Declaration whose age as stated
on ar Ration Book One is 14
years or older...
Cammed Food*
Include all commercially canned fruits (including spiced);
canned vegetables; canned fruit and vegetable juices; canned
soups, chili sauce, and catsup.
Do not include canned olives: canned meat and fish: pickles,
relish; jellies, jams, and preserves; spaghetti, macaroni, and
noodles: or home-canned foods. — --—1 i
3. Number of cans, bottles, and jars (8-ounce size or
larger) of commercially packed fruits, vegeta
bles, juices and soups, chili sauce and catsup
owned on February 21. 1943. minus 5 for
each person included in this Declaration. . . _—— -
4. Number of persons included in this
Declaration...
The name of each person included in this Declaration and the
number of his or her War Ration Book One is:
Print Name Number
1.__
2.__
3. __
4. ___
5. ___
6. __
7. ___
8, _ __
If additional space is needed, attach separate sheet ~ ^
NOTICE.—Section Si (A) of the
United State* Criminal Code make*
it a criminal offense, punishable by
a maximum of II years' imprison
ment. 110.000 fine, or both, to make
a false statement or representation
as to any matter within the jnrisdie
teen of any department or agency of
the United States.
(Signature of applicant or authorised"]
agent) I
and StmtmTi '
FATHER VERY LOW SICK
WANTS TO FIND
DAUGHTER
Mr. Homer D, Hightower and Mrs, Mae
Laumpkin Hightower want to get in touch with
their daughter, Miss Mary Lou Hightower.
Anyne knowing the whereabouts of Miss
Mary Lu Hightower, please get in touch with
Mr. C. C. Galloway at The Omaha Guide office,
2420 Grant St., Phone Webster 1517,
February 21, the first day of the
“freeze” before point rationing be
gins.
The figure for coffee can be ar
rived at by taking the total number
of pounds on hand as of November
28 and deducting one pound for
each person whose age is stated as
14 years or older on War Ration
Book One. the OPA said.
For canned goods it will be nec
essary to include all cans, jars and
bottles containing eight ounces or
more of rationed commercially pack
ed foods, in evcess of five contain
ers for each member of the family.
Canned olives, canned meat and
fish, pickles, relish jellies, jams and '
I preserves: spaghetti, macaroni and
' noodles or home canned foods are
not rationed and do not have to be
counted.
For example, if a family of five
has on hand 30 assorted cans, jars
or bottles of commercially packed
peas, beans, corn, ketchup, soup or
fruit juices, that family will only
have to declare a total of five con
tainers. or one for each member.
OPA officials suggest that house
i wives might find it convenient to
make this “pantry census” on Sun
day. February 21, by spreading
their pantry supplies on the kitchen
table and eliminating all the items
that do not have to be declared.
The smaller cans, containing less
than eight ounces (such as baby
foods) ca then be put back on the
iiiiiiiiiiMiinimiMiiii '.i ■■ ii in m ii ■■ i Miii
shelves. By counting out five cans
for each member of the family and
restoring them to the shelves, the
housewife will have left the exact
number of containers she must
state on the Consumer Declaration
form of shown below on this page.
One eight point blue stamp will
be detached from War Ration Book
Two for each can stated on the de
claration form, but no more than
half the monthly ration will be re
moved from any book. An over
supply will be noted on the ration
book and the stamps torn out of
the next ration book for canned
and processed foods. In the case of
coffee, one stamp will be removed
from War Ration Book One for each
pound over the allowable amount.
OPA officials emphasize that this
“tailoring” of War Ration Book
rwo is in no sense a penalty- Ra
ther. they sav, it is a means of
starting off the rationing program
on as equal a footing as possible
for all citizens.
(See page four ft>r further details*
ELLINGTON MAT GIVE
MORE CONCERTS
NEW YORK. Feb. 18 (ANP)—The
success of the Duke Ellington con
cert at Carnegie hall, has given rise
to plans fer a series of such events
in various cities during the spring
•nd summer. The William Morri
agency which books Ellington is
alying the ground work for a tour
through the east and middle west.
> JAPAN NO FRIEND
OF NEGROES
savs Randolph
(BY LOWELL M. TRICE)
INDIANAPOLIS. Feb. 17 (ANP)—
Bitterly assailing the united nations
for their insincerity of purpose in
their dealings and treatment of col
ored minority groups residing with
in the confines of their democratic
structures of governments, A.
Philip Randolph, international pres
ident of the Brotherhood of Sleep
ing Car Porters, addressed an over
flowing crowd at a monster mass
meeting held at tre Senate Avenue
Y.MCA last Sunday afternoon.
Using as his subject. “A Program
For the Negro in the World Today ’
Mr. Randolph stressed the part that
mass Organizations must play if we
as a group are to ever obtain oar
social, economic and civic rights of
first class American citizenship.
“Some of our friends will say
that the Negro is organized.' he de
clared. “Yes that is true. They
are chiefly organized into fraternal
lodges, churches and social clubs, f
Each has a special purpose. But in
addition to them, we need fighting
organizations like the NAACP and
the March on Washington move- [
ment that were created to struggle j
for Negro rights. Power lies with
the masses- Organization is the
source of power, and no fight can
be waged effectively without pow- i
it
er.
Declaring that certain defeatists
among us are spreading the seeds
of disunity with claims that the Ne
gro masses cannot be organized.
Randolph shouted. “But this is not
true- Uncle Sam organized them
into the army to fight for democ
racy abroad....a democracy which
they have never known. Capital
ists organizatized them in industry
! to work to help make profits at
home.... profits which they never
I get. A name band, Satchell Paige,
the wonder Negro baseball pitcher,
and Joe Louis, the miracle man
’
| boxer, can attract thousands of Ne
groes for a jitterbug contest, a base j
ball game, or a prize fight. Why
can’t the Negro masses be organized
I to fight for their rights?
“However, to organize the mass- j
es. you must go to the masses, in ;
• ■-•in tinned on pageS^=2)
...""""■■"••■■iiaaiiaiMiilllllllllimiMHimilillHimimmil
“My People ’ Negro Radio pro gm
TO BE CARRIED
OVER MUTUAL
SYSTEM
i
The Mutual Boadcasting System.
! cooperating with the Office of W ar
Information, annuonces the ores
entation of the Radio program, ' My
People”, under the direction of Dr.
i G. Imes, on a coast to coast net
I work, beginning last Saturday, Feb.
13th. from 7:00 to 7:30 p. m„ EWT.,
j an continuing thereafter each week
at the same hour.
| They invite everyone to tune in
on y0ur favorite Mutual Station for
this program and send yoUr impres
sions to Dr. Imes at 1440 Broad
way, Mew York City or to the sta
tion to which you are listening.
VVOR. NEW YORK MUTUAL
OUTLET. REFUSES TO CARRY
NEGRO PROGRAM
New York. . WOR. key station of i
the Mutual Broadcasting System
and its only New York outlet, had
refused (up to Feb. 12) to carry the
new OWI porgram dealing with Ne
groes. entitled "My People.” The
program was inaugurated Saturday
Feb. 13. over 211 stations of the Mu
tual system
One excuse offered by Mutual is
that it has a commercial program
occupying 15 minutes of the time re
quired by the new program. An
otehr report is that some official
with authority over WOR program^
is from Georgia and refuses to
make any arrangements to carry
the new feature. WOR frequently
records programs which it cannot
carry at the moment and rebroad
casts them at other hours. No
■Uch arrangement is being nade for
“My People,” it is reported.
The inaugural program will had
Mrs. Roosevelt. President MOrdecai
Johnson of Howard University, j
President Frank P. Graham, of the
University of North Carolina, am!
President Frederick D. Patterson
of Tuskegee Institute, as speakers.
Roland Hayes sang, his part being j
picked up from Los Angeles. G. [
Lake Imes conceived the Series of
programs and will direct them.
Protest against the refusal of lhe
program was filed with Alfred J.
McCOsker. president of WOR. by
Walter White of the NAACP, who
urged the decision be rescinded and
the program carried.
? WASINGTOX. Feb. 18 (AXP) De
fending the color issue in the Pick
ens case. Rep. Charles I. Gifford c-f
Massachusetts said:
“I did not know anything aboU;
William Pickpns until this debase
opened. I did not even know he
was a colored man. I do not like
the idea of bringing the color issue
upon the floor in this manner. Most
of us did not know Mr. Pickena was
& colored man. That should have
nothing to do with it. Why drag
that red herring across the trail?
We love the colored man. I wish
he was not colored, because me
feeling is more favorable toward
him in that he may have done some
thing of which he was not fully
conscious, in his enthusiasm to
help his race.”
As part of the day long debate
Rep. Knutsen of Minnesota added a ,
different note when he declared:
“I voted for the creation of the
Dies committee and for its several
extensions. I expect to vote for an
other extension, because I feel it
is doing a necessary work. But
there is an angle to this question
that I would like to discuss in the
brief time that has been allotted to
me, and that should not be over
looked.
“This body is made up of 435 men
and women, of whom 434 belong
the Caucasian race and one of the
Negro race. I voted to expel from
or to prevent any government bur
eau employing the 38 communists
Chairman Dies read to the house
une day last week. I am wondering
what the country will say when the
people find out that we rejected, by
a small margin, the proposal to
Place an embargo upon their em
ployment in government service,
but that when the name of this man
Pickens came up, a colored man, a
descendant from people who were
brought here in Servitude, this great
body singled out a poor colored man
for punishment and practically gave
what amounts to a whitewash to
the 37 white companions who were
equally or more guilty. I under
stand all these fine distinctions, or
X hope I do. but the cold fact re
mains that we voted on Friday to
bar from public employment one.
poor colored man. and we refused
to take similar action with 37 white
men. My God, that is lynch law. it
is what is termed shotgun justice
out in my country.”
GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR
NEGRO IN SOUTH, SAYS
SPAULDING
CHICAGO, Feb. 18 (ANP) Success j
is tre most efficient weapon Nepal-1
os have to fight segregation and dis '
crimination says C. C. Spaulding,
President of the North Carolina Mu- 1
tual Life Insurance company, in an
article appearing in the February
issue of Negro Z> pest, a magazine !
of N?gro comment published in '
Chicago at 3507 South Parkway.
‘ If i-rd when Negroes break down j
:he undemocratic manifestations in :
this country it will be by their o\ n i
efforts ” Spaulding states. ‘Equality I
and citizenship cannot be legislated. ;
Writing on the subject. "If I were j
Young Again,’’ Mr. Spaulding, who ;
heads one of the largest Negro bus I
inesses .n the world, believes thar j
To Hastie’s Post
CIVILIAN AIDE—The War Department has announced the
appointment of Truman K. Gibson, Jr, of Chicago, 111, as acting
civilian aide to the Secretary of War. Mr. Gibson succeeds Judge
William H. Hastie, whose resignation became effective February 1.
1943. Mr. Gibson has been serving as assistant to Judge Hastie. He
was born at Atlanta Georgia, in 1912 and was graduated from the
University of Chicago School of Law in 1935, being awarded a degree
of Doctor of Jurisprudence. He engaged in the practice of law he
Chicago until his appointment to the War Department in 1940. He
■erved as executive director of the American Negro Exposition in
Chicago until its conclusion in September, 1940.
MANY CHANGES LOOM
IN WAR DEPARTMENT
WASHINGTON. Fel). 19 (ANPh
As a resuh of William Hascie's res
ignation as civilian aide to the sec
retary of war. many changes are
contemplated in the department, it
is reported by officials.
Sec. Stimson. unaware of tbe ser
iousness of the situation, is said to
have ordered immediate action and
a cessation of practices inimcial to
the progress of Negroes in the arm v.
the south offers great opportunity
for the Negro. "Were the oppor
tunity mine as a youth to start life
over again," he says, “my choice
woiflicfTJe to reen^Ttlte' fWld ofTOV
iness in the South. It is here !tf
for the Negro offers its greatest
challenge.”
4 SOLDIERS DISHONORABLY
DISCHARGED FROM ARMY
50 YEARS AT HARD LABOR
FOR FOUR; 1 GETS 40 YEARS
Phoenix, A;z.. Feb. 16 —Five Ne
gro soldi rs were sentenced today
by the general court-martial trying
27 on charges growing out of a
Thanksgiving day riot which h d to
three deaths and injuries to 11 oth
ers.
Four soldiers were given 50 year*
each at hard labor and a fifth was
given 40 years. The men also were
ordered dishonorably discharged.
Changes are expected in several
instances in ocmpliance with the
charges made by Hastie.
Some of the department offici i!-;
touched by these changes are nai
m Washington at present, but upon
their return to their respective ci
fices action will be taken favorable
to Negro troops.
•iiiiii.iiuiiiiisimmiiiiifi iiniusr \
SEEKS TEETH
IN KANSAS
CIVIL RIGHTS
Topeka, Kansas. Feb. 19 (ANP)—
Rep. W. K. Tow>rs of Kansas City.
Kansas, the only colored member of
the state legislature, has introduc
ed a bill which would put teeth in
the present civil rights statute and
if passed, end discrimination against
Negroes in places of public accom
modation. The original bill was
passed in 1874 and has many loop
i holes which have enabled persons
and places guilty of discrimination
to find avenues of escape when
prosecuted.
Towers has been quite active in
the legislature. During the la st
session he introduced a bill which
was enacted that prohibted labor
unions from discrimination in pub
lic or private works on account of
color.
■.■■"""■'■'■"■"■■"■■■iMtimiiiiHimimmimimiimmimmimiiimmimmimiiiimmimimmim; iiiiiiivii! - la
BY COURT OF APPEALS CASE HEARD
LAWRENCE MITCHELL
COURT OF .APPEALS HEARS
HABEAS CORPUS ARGUMENT
FOR LOUISIANA SOLDIERS
NEWORLEANS, La.—Argument.'
on the petition for habeas corpus
in the cases of three colored sold
iers convicted on a rape charge
were heard here February 10 by
the U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals
for the fifth circuit with Judges
Sibley. Holmes and McCall sitting.
The hearing was on the order to
show cause why the writ, served on
Warden Ryan of the Federal Deten
tion headquarters should not be is
sued.
RICHARD P. ADAMS*
u. S. Attorney LaFargue, who
convicted the three men. repres
ented the warden and argued that
the court did not have jurisdiction
to issue the writ- XAACP special
Counsel Thurgood Marshall cited a
late case. Adams vs. Warden, et a!
!S7 L. Ed. 209) where the U. S. Su
preme Court held the CCA could
issue a writ where an appeal was
pending if such an act was neces
sary to caintain its jurisdiction ov
er the case, in the present case m
appeal is pending.
The court decided to take the
matter under advisement. The
JOHN W. BORDENAVE
three soldiers, Lawrence Mitchell,
John Bordenave and Richard P.
Adams were convicted of criminal
attack on a white woman last sum
mer. The trial was held in a feder
al court. NAACP lawyers were
called into the case after the con
viction to carry on the appeal.
Their petition for a h ibeas corpus
writ (which would free the men) is
based on their contention that the
United States government technic
ally, had no jurisdiction in the first
instance, and that the conviction of
the men in a federal court was il
legal.