The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, February 06, 1943, City Edition, Page FOUR, Image 4

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    , ROBERT ||
CIVIL WAR HERt,
VfATfcSfAAM
V 1
A PILOT OK THE CONFEDERATE TRANSPORT
"PLANTER", HE RAN THE SHIP
OF CHARLESTON HARBOR
IS*, 1862, AND
HER TO THE
SQUADRON.
®0R THIS &AILANT
\ ACTION, HE WAS
\ APPOINTED A PILOT
IN THE NAVY,
S\ AND &IVEN
gCtcONlMAND OF THE
PLANTERS
$ERVEb FIVE TERMS
AS A MEMBER OF
THE CONGRESS
OF THE UNITED STATES
0
ROBERT SMALLS,
US. NAVAL TRAINING
STATION. NAMED IN HONOR OF
THIS UNIQUE FI&VJRE IH AMERICAN HISTORY.
Qfc&U I I
McGILL’S —
HAR & BLUE ROOM
E. McGill, Prop
2123-25 NORTH 21tl. St.
WINE. LIQUORS, and
CIGARS
Blue Room Open 8 p. m. to 1 a. m.
Open for Private Parties from
2 to 7 p. m.
—No Charges—
WE SPECIALIZE IN MIXED
DRINKS.
Free Delivery front 8 a m to
t a. m
IA 9111
WE CARRY A FULL LINE
OF BONDED LIQUORS
ft Do You Want II § 11%
| LONGER HAIR
jtJust try this SYSTEM on youi
j HAIR 7 deys and see if yon are
I really enjoying the pleasure of
Attractive Hair that so often
captures Love and Romance.
rjiair May Get Longer
j? when SCALP and HAIR conditions
are normal and the dry, brittle, break
ing off hair can be retarded, it has a
chance to get longer and much more
beautiful, just try the JUELENE
SYSTEM 7 days and let your mirroi
prove results. Send $1.00, (if C. O. D.
— postage extra) Fully guaranteed.
Money back if not delighted Write to
JUELCO.. 3724 N.CIark St
Dept a317 CHICAGO, ILL.
Real Shoe Man—
FONTENELLE
SHOE REPAIR
Cash and Carry
CLEANER
1110 North 24th St.
CARL CRIVEhiv
READ The ‘
GIRLS
ON THE
STREFTS
FATHER EARL HINES
and orchestra will be at til 3
Dreamland Ballroom on 24th and
Grant Streets February the 18th.
Jimmy Jewell .who books noth
ing but the most famous leaders,
can expect a large crowd that
night, because Hines rates in
Brpnzeville just as he does out
East.
Also February 22, Charity Ball.
Lloyd Hunter, Dreamland.
Dreamland Ballroom was really
a sensational knockout. The mus
ic set the hep cats ozzin along the
floor with complete satisfaction.
Thocs Gitterbug partners, such
as Wendell Jenkins and Lilly An
derson, Arista Taylor and Luther
Taylor, Ester and her partner and
a couple of other couples enter
tained the mob during the dance.
The large sentimental hall was
well packed and no damage was !
done. Leroy Johnson seemed to
like the way Mary Harris dances
—he spent a good deal of the ev
ening with her. \
Mary Franklin was really the
lick, that Chic, was sharp as a Jap
She was wearing a drapped peg
blue stripe suit. She was really
on like mad—Leaving the hall, we
dug a black Chesterfield and
Chickie derby she added to the rare
outfit.
#_
The most attractive corner on
24th St., is th atbeauty polar call
ed “Verse's”. It is really attrac
tive from the outside and inside.
Mabee that is why a certain cat
that runs from Lo - Angeles to!
Bronzevilie stops there on every j
stop to set a manicure.
Lloyd Hunter’s orchestra who ^
played for the Elks dance Satur- j
day night gave the bugs something
to bug on. That music was so
‘ hot” it "heated' the hall, and af
ter every session those cats and
chicks were going out gasping lor
wind. The style show which is an
annual affair was a complete cue
cess and was followed by a dance
lasting until the orchestra struck
up "home sweet home” at two c-'
clock.
The jammed hall that is rather
small (compared to the Dreamland
was rather difficult to turn around
in when it came to “buggin.” so
the studds left everything up to
Lloyd Hunter—he played mostly
Sentimental numbers that just
"sent ya!”
At two five everyone was Up
stairs socializing for the rest cf
the morning.
Last week at the Orpheum every
hepped or halfway hepped cats
dug the stage show.
Featuring the three Ink Spot3,
5 /4e £emt
■ > This husky fellow was designed
to furnish the motive power
for one of the Union Pacific fleet
of Limited trains providing com
fortable passenger transportation
between Chicago and the West
Coast. Today, he and many like
him are performing an important
war-time task. Uncle Sam has
called on the railroads, not only
to move vast quantities of war
materials, but also to transport
thousands of men in service. Thus,
we are not always able to provide
preferred accommodations for
civilians who find it necessary to
travel. To these patrons. Union
Pacific wishes to express its
appreciation for their patience
and cooperation.
1416 Dodge St., Omaha, Neb.
Phone JAckion 5822 XuBSOT
UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD
kOAO O^ .TMIxfTRlAII iINCRt.ANR jLT HC'^CMAL L t M 6 t A ft
(since one is ill)—Lucky Millinder
who to my opinion has the best
band in the world—Certain Cats
and chics wonder why he hasn t
been at the Dreamland yet. Since
Jimmy Jewell gets the best for us
—everyone wants to hear Lucky
Millinder. and Sister Tharpe,—
whom we all have been waiting to
hear and to the crowds disappoint
ment only appeared on stage once.
The Ink Spots were also at the
Ernie Fields dance while in
“Bronzeville.”
IT’S IMPOSSIBLE
t o keep Bronzeville’s play mates
out of that Greek place on 24th
called the American Weiner shop.
The owner likes the way your
money circulates while you are
there, but he doesn’t care about
you being there.
Oh: If only there was some way
you people could throw your mon
ey in there from the outside.
There is a new manager in there
now—Police Foxall. We gets a
little better service now. Thanks
to Foxall.
Of all the people to wmnt to use
a knife—can you feature Marjorie
Johnson at the Elks club flashing,
one she planned to sharpen on an
other out of the city chic.
Maggie Johnson who is in De
jtroit visiting—expects to return
' home soon. She is really enjoying
| herself according to last reports.
Donald Stewart who is over seas
is doing nicely with those Yellow
Japs. He was hurt sometime ago
but everythnig is honkey donkey
now.
He'll be home when he helps kill
up our enemies—those Japs.
Next Week is “The Great Lov
er's” Week.
You hep cats can explain what
you’ve been trying to say all year,
with a “Valentine.” Seen in the
Drug store pricing candy—a cer
tain hep cat.
—
What kind of business is this?
Since Jean Wright has antrCpd
back to Omaha from the small
town—she seems to excite Jack
Hoard and Nate Mills.
Delphia Nue who has been gone
for sometime was seen in the Wein
er shop.
Isn’t it strange—Joe Brooks is
in the army—yet Charlotte Hayes
Brooks ordered a couple of chicks
up from a occupied booth saying
—Those two seats are taken—who
is shorty?
Corrinne Seay was seated with
an old flame A. T. Where was
Kapplell and why wasn’t he on
scene.?
Why did a certain cat W. Mc
join the army a few months after
he married—Is it because he fig
ured—It couldn't be worse than
married life.?
That’s all this week—
GIRLS on the STREETS.
STATEMENT OF WM. HAST IE
RECENTLY CIVILIAN AIDE
TO SEC’Y OF WAR
(continued from pi)
vide enlisted technicians for the
new air base at Tuskegep, a few
Negro soldiers were accepted for
tchnical trainnig at Chanute Field
where a large school is maintain
ed. The men were well received
and did excellent work. I urged
the importance of continuing 3uch
training of Negroes in this exist
ing unsegregated school. But the
program stopped with the first}
gruop. The Air Forces then made
efforts to set up technical train
ing at xuskegee or elsewhere. Dif
ficulties were encountered. Mean
while, successive classes of Ne
gro Pilots were being trained, but
no technical schooling of support
ing ground crew members was in
progress. Thus, even the segre
gated program bot badly out of
balance in the effort to effect its
extension. The prospect is that in
1943, even with a tardy resumption
of technical ground training, Ne
gro pilots will be ready before and
faster tha nadequate numbers cf
trained ground crews are available
The Air Forces also are reject
ing Negro applicants wh0 wish to
become weather officers or offic
ers in other highly specialized!
technical fields. A few such men
were trained for Tuskegee. But
for a period of more than six mon
ths, all qualified Negro candidates
have had their completed applica
nts YOUR—
POULTRY
AT THE
NEBRASKA
PRODUCE
2204-6 NORTH 24th ST.
oh the Best in Quality at the
NEBRASKA PRODUCE
Lowest Price
PHONE WE. 4137
SUBSCRIBE
tions returned to them with the
information that the Air Force.?
need no more Negro weatehr of
ficers. The Air Forces, however,
do need large numbers of addit
ional weather officers so badly
that white volunteers are being
solicited and accepted, despite a
general policy against voluntary
enlistments in the Army. Yet. it
is unthinkable to those in author
ity that a Negro officer can fill
such a position except at Tuskegee
The same situation exists in arm
ament and engineering, both
ground specialities for which the
Air Forces have been accepting
cadets generally, but refusing Ne
groes.
To date, all Negro applicants, a
number of them well and fullv
qualified, for appointment as Ar
my service pilots have been re
jected. Two applicants were act
ually instructed to report for
training They did so but were
sent home as soon as it was dis
covered that they were Negroes.
I am advised that this matter is
receiving further study. The sim
ple fact is that the Air. Command
does not want Negro Pilots flying
in and out of various fields, eat
ing, sleeping and mingling with
other personnel, as a service pilot
must do in carrying out his var
ious missions.
Negro medical officers in the
Air Forces are getting only part
of the special training in aviation
medicine which is available. They
are not admitted to the principal
school of aviation medicine at.
Randolph Field. Even the branch
school program in which it is rep
resented that Negro officers share
without discrimination is in factN
discriminatory. Many white offic
ers enrolled at branch schools of
aviation medicine have the oppor
tunity of full time resident study.
The Negro officer is permitted to
commute periodically from hid
home station at Tuskegee for work
at the Maxwell Field branch
school. Such grudging partial ten
der of makeshift schemes may be
expected to continue unless a gen
uine change of racial attitude and
.policy occurs in the Air Command.
while Negro trainees and cad
ets at the Tuskegee Air Base have
done well from a strictly techn
ical Point of view, they have suf
fered such demoralizing discrim
ination and segregation that, in
my judgement, the entire future of
the Negro in combat aviation is
in danger. Men cannot be humil
iated over a long period of time
without a loss of combat efficiency
Specifically, Negro and white
officers serving at Tuskegee in
the common enterprise of train
ing Negroes for air combat have
separate messes. They are not
permitted to have quarters in the
same building. Separate toilet
facilities have been provided, if
the group of white officers at
Tuskegee insist upon this and I
have no evidence that they do—
they are psychologically unsuited
to train Negroes for combat. If
they do not insist, the racial atti
tude of the local commander or of
higher authority is all the mora
apparent.
Despite original design to ad
vance Negro officers and to placa
them in posts of administrative
responsibility at Tuskegee as rap
idly as they should qualify, that
design is not being carried out in
the post administration, except in
the station hospital.
Early in the history of the Tus
kegee project, a Negro soldier
guarding a warehouse was dis
armed and arrested by civilian
authorities because he had chall
enged a white civlian. From then|
on friction continued. A new com
mander was appointed. He dis
armed Negro military policemen,
assigned to patrol duty in rhe
town of Tuskegee. A recent mem
THE OMAHA GUIDE
A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
Published Every Saturday at 2418-20 Grant St
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
PHONE WEbster 1517
W——
Entered as Second Class Matter Maxh 15, 1927, at
the Post Office at Omaha, Nebraska, under Act of
Congress of March 3, 1879.
U. J. Ford. — — — Pres.
Mrs. Flurna Coooe*-, — — Vice Pres
C. C. Gailowav. — Pubiisher and Acting Editor
Boyd V. Gallcfway, — Sec’v and Treas
- -™'J!-- J-__U»
SUBSCRIPTION RAIfc IN OivlAI'A
One Year — — — tz <_■*
Six Months — — — — $i 26
Three Months — — .,6
One Month — — -- . 25
SUBSCRIPTION RATE OUT O! low \'
One Year — — — — |2 50
Six Months — — — Hi 50
Three Months — — _ 5 i .00
One Month — — — — .10
All News Copy of Churches and all organiznt*
ions must he in our office not later than 1:00 p. m,
Monday for current issue. All Advertising Copy <n
Paid Articles not later than Wednesday noon, pre
ceeding date of issue, to insure publication.
National Advertising Representative:
INTERSTATE UNITED NEWSPAPERS, INC.,
645 Fifth Avenu*. New York City, Phone MUrray
Hill 2-5452, Ray ‘ick, Manager.
85,000 Scouts All Out for Uncle’Sam
<#
vli
Thousands of Negro Boy Scouts throughout America are helping their brother Scouts win the war
on the home front. An example of their work is this pile of scrap metal and rubber gathered by
Troop 88, Richmond, Va. There are approximately 85,000 Negro Boy Scouts in the United States.
her of the Alabama state pola e
force was assigned to Tuskegee
as an Army officer with duties re
lated to his civilian experience.
The Negro soldier was embittered,
but the prejudiced community wa~<
somewhat mollified.
Fundamentally, it seems to me
the Air Command has either fail
ed to comprehend or failed to
care that its policies and practic
es are tending to tear down rath
er than build up the pride, dignity
an dself respect which Negro sol
diers, like al lot her soldiers must
possess if they are to achieve max
imum combat efficiency. Military
men agree that a soldier should be
made to feel that he is the best
rAWwvwwAWtVWW
24th AND t AKL’ STKEK I > .
PRESCRIPTIONS
—Free Delivery_
WE. 0609
DUFFY ,n'KMA,v
“THE GAS
I SAVE HELPS
MAKE MORE
BOMBS”
Every cubic foot of gas you save in
your home means just that much more
gas for war industries and training
camps. Please remember . . . YOUR
GAS SERVICE IS VITAL TO VICTORY
—USE IT SPARINGLY I
man, in the best unit in the best
Army in the world. When the Air
Command shall direct its policies
and practices so as to help rather
thaai hinder the development of
such spirit among its Negro sold
iers, it will be on the right road.
“IT PAYS TO LOOK WELL”
MAYO’S BARBER SHOP
Ladies and Children’s Work
A Specialty
2422 LAKE ST.
If ytu are buyinc a laxative
answer these 3 questions first
Ques. Why do most people choose
a popular laxative instead of a less
er known product? Ans. Because a
popular-seller can generally be
counttd on to give satisfaction or it
could not have won the respect of
its users. Ques. What is one laxa
tive that has been a popular-seller
with four generations? Ans. Black
Draught/ QUes. Why is Black
Draught made in 2 forms? Ans
Because many think the new gran
ulated form is even easier to take.
Black-Draught costs only 25c for
25 to 40 doses. It is purely herbal.
Usually gentle, prompt, thorough.
Follow label directions.
Thrifty Service
6 LBS. OF LAUNDRY BEAUTIFULLY
LAUNDERED FOR ONLYCO AND OMt
7c For Each Additional lb.
This includes the Ironing of all FLAT
WORK with bearing Apparel Returned Ju-t
Damp Enough for Ironing.
EMERSON - SARATOGA
2324 North 21th St. WE. lU#f
"YOU GIRLS .WHO SUFFER^
® Distress From •
~ FEMALE WEAKNESS
And Want To Build Up
Red Blood!
Take heed If you, like so many
women and girls, have all or any one
of these symptoms: Do you on such
days suffer cramps, headaches, back
ache, weak, nervous feelings, dis
tress of ‘'Irregularities", periods of
the blues — due to functional
monthly disturbances?
Then start at once—trv Lydia E.
Pinkham's Compound TABLETS
<wlth added Iron)—made especially
/or women. 1
£ Pinkham's Tablets are famous not
only to relieve monthly pain but
also accompanying weak, nervous
feelings of thts nature. This is be
cause of their soothing effect on
ONE OP WOMAN’S MOST IMPOR
TANT ORGANS. Taken regularly—
Plnkham’s Tablets help build up
resistance against such symptoms.
9 Thousands upon thousands have re
ported benefit. •
Also, their iron helps build up red
blood to give more strength. Plnk
ham’s Tablets are also a fine stom
achic tonic 1 Follow label directions.