The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, January 17, 1942, City Edition, Image 1

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Drugstore largest accredited negro newspaper west of Chicago and north of Kansas city —member of the associated negro press
Vniter Act of March 8. 1874—Business Phone: WEM5I7**’ Nebraaka, Qmaha, Nebraska, Saturday, January 17, 1942 OUR 14th YEAR—No. 44, City Edition, 5c Copy
EXPECT REGISTRATION OF 9,000,000 FEB.-16
PHI DELTA KAPPA ‘WHITE CLAUSE’ ISSUE AGAIN FLARES INTO NATIONAL PROMINENCE
• ••
EFFORT TO REMOVE “WHITE
CLAUSE” FROM CONSTITU
TION LOSES BY NARROW
MARGIN .
COLUMBUS, O., Jan. 12 rby
Barbee W. Durhham for ANP) —
Concentrated effort on the part oi
the Sigma Committee on Educa
tion to have the now famous white
clause removed from the constitu
tion of Phi Delta Kappa, national
honorary educational fraternity
met with failure when delegates
at the national convention voted
42-47, to retain it. Altho a maj
ority of the delegates, who con
vened at the LaSalle hotel in Chi
cago on Dec. 28-31, were in favor
of the change, the effort was not
supported by the needed 2-3 maj
ority necessary to change the con
stitution, according to Prof. G. D.
Weibe, of the bureau of education
al research at Ohio State univers
ity, and president of the Sigma
committee.
The "white Clause” has been an
issue for 10 or 15 years and came
in for national attention in 1939
when Sigma Chapter of Ohio state
requested the committee on stan
dards and ethics of the national
council to define the word “white”
as used in that clause of the na
tional constitution which restricted
membership to white male stud
ents only.
After some delay, the commit
tee reported that it was unable to
define the word “white” as used in
the clause in question. There up
on Sigma Chapter of Ohio state
defined the term as applying to a
person of any race who is moral
ly white. The chapter then init
iated two honor students, George
Wright, a Negro, and Dai Ho Chun
a Chinese student.
Following this action, the nat
ional organization of Phi Delta
Kappa suspended Sigma chapter
and ordered it to cease business.
In order to carry on the members
organized the present Sigma com
mittee on Education, and launch
ed an intensive fight to have the
white clause stricken out.
Since the national organization
only meets every two years, the
meeting last week was the first
tim that the issue has been on the
floor. From the first there was
a studied attempt to avoid the is
sue. When a vote was finally se
cured the delegates voted 47 to
42 to strike out the clause. Altho
a majority, there was a shortage
Of 13 votes for the two thirds maj
ority necessary to change the con
stitution. The organization then
informed Sigma chapter that it
would be reinstated if it would
drop Wright and Chin. Not weak
ening in its stand, Sigma commit
tee again forced the issue to the
floor, whereupon it was referred
to a committee.
When the issue came up the
third time, the organization voted
to revoke the charter of Sigma,
chapter unless Wright and Chun
were expelled. In commenting up
on this action, Prof. Weibe stated
trat the Sigma Committee on Ed
ucation will, in all probability, re
tain Chun and Wright in good
standing and continue its fight a
gainst racial discrmination. This
statement suggests that Sigma
chapter may send its charter back
to the national organization.
On the convention floor, it was
noticeable that the Opposition was
was not all from below the Mason
and Dixon line. The effort rec
eived the support of some of the
southern delegates while some of
the delgates from the northern
states opposed it.
The inconsistency of the organ
ization’s stand on the white clause
issue was brought out into the op
en when it voted down a motion,
from a Kansas delegate that the
executive committee investigate
the initiation of one Carl Jesus
Maritus, a full blooded Aztec In
dian.
In conclusion, Prof. Weibe stat
ed that the administration of the
college of education of Ohio state
DON’T TAKE THIS
LYING DOWN . . .
i,j k'
When men are fighting and
dying, you must do your part.
Be sure you enlist your DOL
LARS for DEFENSE. Back our
armed forces—and protect your
own life—with every single dol
lar and dime you can.
America must have a steady
flow of money pouring in every
day to help beat back our ene
mies.
Put Dimes into Defense
Stamps. And put Dollars into
Bonds. Buy now. Buy every
pay day. Buy as often as you
can.
Don’t take this lying down.
USO ENTERTAIN AT MITCHELL FIELD
Hempstead, Long Island, has the right approach to a service man's
heart—through his stomach.
500 DELEGATES OF PHI
DELTA KAPPA AND KAPPA
ALPHA PSI ATTEND SUPPER
DANCE GIVEN BY PEPSI
COLA COMPANY
About five hundred delegates of
Phi Delta Kappa and Kappa Al
pha Psi fraternities, assembled in
Indianapolis for their respective
conventions, attended a supper
dance sponsored by Pepsi-Colai
Company, at the Sunset Terrace,
a popular Indianapolis Negro
night club.
The affair, the first of its kind
ever sponsored by a major concern
at a convention of these groups,
followed a joint meeting of the
two fraternal organizations, at
which Herman T. Smith, head of
the Negro Marketing Divisior of
Pepsi-Cola Company, spike on
‘ Salesmanship As A Boost to Rac
ial Understanding and Good Will”.
Allen Lee McKellar, one of the
winners of the 1940 Walter Mack
Job Awards for American Youth,
created by Pepsi-Cola Company to
give college graduates the oppor
tunity of a year of paid business
training, also spoke and told of
his experiences in the business
world. Mr. McKellar, having com
p’f ted his year of training, is now
a full fledged representative of
Pepsi Cola Company, in the Negro
Marketing Division, his territory
comprisng Mississippi, Georgia,
Alabama, and Florida.
The other Negro Job Award
winters are Jeannette Maned,
1940, a graduate of Hampton le
st ituR; Marion O. Bond, 11* r.,
Lar.e College; an I Phillip Kalie,
1941. of Morgan College. Ad are
employed n the Negro Marti c.tirg
1 i\: ion of Pepsi "on C.'irr any.
is very sympathetic with the Sig
ma Committee on Education and.
has worked in close harmony with
it in this issue. Ira Kline of Hew
York universtiy is the national
president of Phi Delta Kappa.
ROOSEVELT WARNS AGAINST
RACE TROUBLES
Washington, Jan. 14 (ANP)..
In his message to congress last
week President Roosevelt emphas
ised the following racial attitude.
“We must be particularly vigil
ant against racial discrimination
in any of its ugly forms. Hitler
will try again to breed mistrust
and suspicion between one indiv
idual and another, one group and
aother, one race and another.”
REV. J. H. BRANHAM, OLIVETS
ASSISTANT PASTOR,
SUCCUMBS AFTER BRIEF
! ILLNESS
Chicago, Jan. 12 (ANP) Funer
al services were to be held Tues
■ day for Rev. J. H. Branham, Sr.,
for 23 years assistant pastor of
■ Olivet Baptist Church here. Ga
thered to pay respects at the last
rites of the noted churchman
were Bapist leaders and men and
women from all walks of life. Rev
Branham succumbed last Wednes
day in Provident hospital after a
brief illness.
In accordance with the deceas
■ ed’s wishes the final rites saw tne
Rev. J. H. Jackson, pastor, offic
i Nine civilian clubs and associa
tions at Hempstead, Long Island,
cooperated with the United Serv
ice Organizations last week in the
arrangement of entertainment for
service men quartered at Mitchell
Field Army Air Base. Working
with USO Director F. E. Robbins,
and Arthur W. Harvey head of the
local home hospitality plans,
brought together the following
groups;
Harriet Tubmau Community
Club of Hempstead; Willing Wor
kers Club of Westbury; The Soc
ialites; Magnolia Club; Nassau
Tennis Club; Long Island Civic
Club; Women’s Auxiliary of Hem
pstead; The Club 13 and Elmont
Civic Club. Many other smaller
clubs also joined in the home hos
pitality plans, which are worked
out with the assistance of the mor
ale officer of the post.
The first party was highly at
tended; a delicious turkey dinner
with the customary embellish-1
ments was served, dancing was to
music by Jimmy Walker and his
orchestra. Special midnight en
tertainment was provided by pro
fessional talent sent to Hempstead
from New York.
“The success of frequent activ
ities such as this, worked out by
the sponsoring organization with
the cooperation of the USO hospit
ality committee, has assisted great
ly the more than 20 civic groups,
of Nasau County,” Mrs. Harvey
said. “It is a system which might
very well be emulated in other
communities of the country. Civic
clubs, all religious denominations
and other fraternal groups coop
erate to present a unified effort
to serve the man in uniform un
der the banner of the USO.”
nranmwMiuMMiWMmMk
iating and the eulogy delivered by
Dr. R. C, Barbour, Nashville, ed
itor of National Baptist Voice
The reverend’3 death comes a
little over a year after that of his
close friend and fellow minister,
the late Rev. Lacey Kirk Williams
president of the National Baptist
Convention, Inc., who was killed
in an airplane crash on Oct. 29,
1940.
Although he had been ill, his
condition was not reported ser
ious. His widow, Mrs. Irma Bran
ham; two sons, Revs. John L.
and Joseph Branham, Jr., and a
daughter, Selma, who rushed here
from Spelman college by plane,
attended him at the end.
During his lifetime, he was
chairman of the transportation
committee of the National Baptist
Convention, Inc., and upon two oc
casions served as pastor of Salem
Baptist Church here when the in
stitution was without a minister.
One of the widely known Baptist
leaders in the country, he was non
ored for distinguished service cov
ering 23 years as assistant past«.r
of Olivet by a testimonail on April
20.
Born in Tyler, Tex., Sept. 19,
1883, the son of Mr. and Mrs. John
Branham, he came to Chicago in
1917. In connection with his as
sistant pastoral duties at Olivet,
he was also president of Chicago
Baptist Ministerial conference. |
Negro White
Volunteer
Army Div.
Proposed
New York—A volunteer division
of the U. S. Army open to all men
of any race, creed, color or nation
al origin has been proposed by
Walter White, secretary of the Na
tional Association for the Advance
ment of Colored People to Armj
Chief of Staff General George C.
Marshall.
The suggestion, embodied 11 a
letter sent December 22 to the
Army chief, has been endorsed by
P. L. Prattis, executive editor of
the Pittsburgh Courier; Carter
Wesley, general manager of ‘the
Houston, Texas, Informer; and
William O. Walker, managing ed
itor of the Cleveland, Ohio, Call
Post, all of whom strongly urgerj
the activities of such a unit.
Th NAACP urged the War De
partment to organize the inter
racial volunteer division on the
basis that it will be a practical
step toward giving a "tremendous
lift to the morale of the Negro
which at present is at a dangerous
Iy low ebb."
“We are convinced,” the Assoc
iation said, "that it would also
have a tremendous psychological
effect upon white Americans, and
it would give the lie to the attacks
made by Nazi Germany and other
Axis powers to the effect that the
United States talks about democ-/
racy but practices racial discrim
ination and segregation.”
The NACP also asserted: "A
gratifying number of young white
Americans have expressed them
selves as believing that racial se
gregation in the Army is undem
ocratic and dangerous to our na
tional morale. Our belief in the
practicability of such a division is
based upon correspondence in the
iffice and contacts which various
members of our staff have had
with student bodies ranging from
the University of California to
Campobello Island, New Bruns
wick.”
The suggestion is not ongm3:
with the NAACP but was made by
Claude A. Barnett, director of the
Associated Negro Press at the cor.
ference of Negro editors with Gen
eral Marshall and other War De
partment officials in .Washingto.1
December 8th.
RED CROSS CALLS PREJU
DICE ‘A SYMBOL OF
DEMOCRACY’
New York.... The American
Red Cross has stated that it not
only does not want, but does not
need the blood of Negro donors for
wounded sailors and soldiers. It
did not stop there, but declared
that individual prejudices should
be respected as a symbol of dem
ocracy.
In a letter to Dr. E. R. Alexan
der of this city, December 30, S
Sloan Colt, Director of the Red
Cross War Drive states: ‘Tho
Red Cross is now able to obtain
from white donors enough blood to
keep all the processing plants ful
ly occupied so that the total am
ount of blood plasma available to
the armed forces is not lessened
by our inability to accept Negro
donors.”
The letter, which Dr. Alexander
has referred to the NAACP was in
answer to a protest from him . -
bout me Red Cross policy.
Ihe NAACP pointed out tho
irony in Colt’s statement attem't
ing to explain the policy.
After admitting that there s o
scientific basis for objections to
transfusions of the blood of - .
groes, he said: “It se
feelings and perhaps even the ve
judices of individuals to whoor^
transfusions are given should be
respected as a symbol of democ
racy.”
_
DEMOCRATIC
WAY OF LIFE
| BY RUTH TAYLOR I
MaKe no mistake about it—
in war as well as in peace
the democratic way of life de
mands more of its follower*
than does any other form of
government.
The democratic way of lifo
demands thought. Its citizenq
are not ruled by dictates from
a master, but have to govcr 4
themselves-what laws they
have are made by them, so
that there is no alibi when they
fall short. They obey order:!
from those whom they have e
lected to lead them and from
their deputies alone.
The democratic way of lil'c
demands self control. Man i:>
not restrained by force, but
must reason and restrain him
self. He is not trained to war
.... but by reason of his self
control, he can put aside his
most cherished work to fight
for those liberties to which he
hopes to return.
The democratic way of life
demands education. Not thu
education given to the children
in the dictator ruled state
but the training in thinking
things out and in thinking
things through. Man must
learn to live in a democracy*
He must educate to live with
his fellow man, without regard
to class, race, creed or color, to
cooperate without meddling, to
act in a spirit of fellowship
without any attempt to domin
eer over the life of someon-j
else, and to accept the pecul
iarities of another as he expects
his own peculiarities to be ac
cepted.
The democratic way of life
demands cooperation. In order j
to make it work there must be
an opportunity for each citizen
to earn a living, to have oppor
tunities equal to hi3 natural
capabilities and to have a
chance to develop those capab
ilities to the utmost. We have
gone far under the capitalist
system, and if we want to see
free enterprise continue we will
have to see that it works for.
the good of all. Under our de
mocratic way of life the com
mon laborer in factory or on
the farm already has a far hi
gher standard of living than in
any other country in the world, i
Some rabble rousers say that Id '
defending capitalism we are de
stroying democracy. But our
people remember that it was
from behind that war cry that r
Hitler destroyed democracy in !
Germany.
The democratic way of life
demands constructive action.
We must not be content with
things as they were or things i
as they are, but we must plan I
and work for a better world to
morrow. We have progressed
because our standards have j
gone up. We can progress only i
as we take steps to insure still
finer things for the coming gen
eration.
The democratic way of life? j
demands consecration. Democ- ;
racy is not of free gift—it must j
be earned anew by each gener
ation. We must defend our de
mocratic heritage both from
the enemies without and from
the enemies within-indiff
erence, neglect and carelessness j
We must rededicate ourselves
to the prinicples upon which
our government is founded.... '
and live up to them in our
daily life as well as in our pub
lic utterances. We must fight
and if needs be, gladly die for
these imperishable things.
This and only thus will the de
mocratic way of life endure.
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHAS TO
OBSERVE FOUNDERS’ DAY
During the months of .Tnnuary
and February, Chapters of the Al
pha Kappa Alpha sorority through
out the country will be observing
Founders Day.
.inis year will be the thirty
fourth year that Alpha Kappa Al
pha has been in existenct.
Gamma Beta Chapter of Omah^j
will observe Founders' Day on
Approximately 15,000 male res
idents in Nebraska will be regis
tered in the 20 and 21 year old age
groups on February 16th, Brigad
ier General Guy N. Henniuger,
State Director of Selective Service
announced today.
National Selective Service head
quarters anticipates a total regis
tration in Continental United Star
es of about 9,000,000 men between
the ages of 20 and 45 years, the
Director has been advised, and of
these about 1,650,000 will be in
the 20 and 21 year old group.
It also is estimated that around
7,350,000 in the 36 to 44 year old
group will be registered through
out the United States on February
16th, together with some in the 21
to 36 year old groups who were
unable or neglected to register at
the two previous registrations.
The age groups to be registered
Dn February 16th include all men
hot previously registered who have
attained their twentieth birthday
on December 31, 1941, and who
have not reached their forty-fifth
birthday on February 16, 1942;
that is: All unregistered male
residents in the United States who
were bom between February 17,
1897 and December 31, 1921.
January 24 and 25. They will
have as their guest, Miss Rosetta
Nolan of Kansas City. Miss Nol
an is one of the national vice-pre3
Idents of Alpha Kappa Alpha. She
has held this office for several
years. Miss Nolan will be pres
ented at a public meeting on Sun
day afternoon January 25.
Mrs. Ruth Solomon is general
chairman of the Founders’ Day '
activities.
FIGHT FANS LEARN ABOUT
JIM CROW IN THE NAVY
New York_Thousands of
fight fans learned about the Navys
discrimination against Negroes
last Friday night, January 9, when)
leaflets bearing the slogan “Hero
ism Knows No Colorline!” were
distributed around Madison Square
Garden here by members of tha
NAACP Manhattan Youth Coun
cil and national officers when Joe
Louis fought Buddy Baer for the
benefit of the Navy Relief Fund.
The leaflet carries the official
report of the heroism of a Negro
mess attendant in the Pearl Har
bor attack and points out that in
spite of the Navy’s urgent appeal
for men, it refuses to accept will
ing Negroes for service except an
messmen.
NEWS IN
BRIEF
WELL KNOWN PULLMAN
PORTER, BUD RAY DIES
While on his regular railroad
run, enroute to St. Louis, Mo.,
Mr. (Bud) Ray, veteran pullman,
porter of 32 years, was suddenly
stricken, and before a doctor could
attend him as he was being taken
from the train at Auburn, Nebr ,
he died.
Mr. Bud Ray, age 58 years, was
well known in local circles, hav
ing lived in Omaha for 55 years.
He is survived by his wife, Mrs.
Ray, one daughter, Mrs. Mabel
Ray Avant, Earl and Barbar Jean
and one grandchild, Avon Avant.
Myers Funeral Home will bring
the body back to Omaha from Au
burn
JOINS SWEETHEARTS OF
RHYTHM IN WASHINGTON
Miss Anna Mae Winburn, sing
er with Lloyd Hunter’s band left
Tuesday for Washington, D. C.
where she will join The Sweet
hearts of Rhythm, an all girl’s
swing band from Piney Woods.
Miss. This band is managed by
our own Rae Lee Jones.
Miss Winburn, with her charm
ing personality and talent, will be
a great asset to this popular ag
gregation of artists.
FIGHT AT DANCE HALL; TWO
MEN GIVEN FINES
Two men were fined and one re
ceived a suspended sentence Tues
day in police court as a result of
i fight Monday night at Dream
land hall, twenty-fourth and Grant
Streets, where Duke Ellington's
orchestra was playing.
Fined $15 each were Grant
West, Fort Riley, Kans., a soldier
and his brother, Carl West, 21 of
2904 R Street. James Prather, 18
of 2811 R. Street, got a suspended
fine but did not take part in the
fight.
CHAUNCEY HODGES ELECTED
TO COMMISSIONERSHIP OF
BOYSTOWN
Chauncey Hodges, son of one of
Omaha's best known hotel m?n,
was recently elected to fill one of
the Commissioners’ Jobs at Father
Flanagan’s Boy’s Town home.
His father is very proud of him.
UNION SERVICES TO BE HELD
AT PTLGRIM, SUNDAY JAN. 17
Union Services will be held at
the Pilgrim Baptist Church, 25th
and Hamilton Streets, next Sun
day night at 7:30 p. m. Rev. E
F. Ridley, Pastor of St. John AMFI
Church, will bring the message.
BIRTHDAY BALLS TO AID
NAACP FIGHT FOR NATIONAL
DEFENSE EQUALITY
New York. .At the famed Savoy
Ballroom in Harlem, the key dance
}f the series of NAACP Birthday
Balls will be held Wednesday,
February 11, the night before
Lincoln’s birthday.
Branches throughout the coun
try are scheduled to mark the cel
ebration with dances of their own.
Pro :eeds from the dances will be
used to help maintain the NAA
CP’s fight for equality in the na
tional defense program.
VISITING DELEGATES WITH
NAACP PRESIDENT AT ANNU
AL MEETING:
Among the visiting delegntc-s
attending the NACP 33rd annual
I
meeting held at the National Of
fice, 69 Fifth Avenue, New York
N. Y., on January 5th were: Dr.
Harry Greene, Miss Mary Lou’sa
Allen, Philadelphia, Pa.; Mrs.
Fred F. Durrah, Miss Eleanor Ter
rell, Plainfield, N. J.; Arthur B.
Spingarn, President of the NAA
CP.; Mrs. Ruth Thompson, Plain
i field, N. J.; Miss Evelyn Terry,
Philadelphia, Pa.; Miss Carolyn
Davenport, Norristown, Pa.; M.
G. Knowles, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Mrs.
Randall L Tyus, New York City;
Theodore Spaulding, Philadelphia,
NAACP ELECTS 18 TO NATIONAL BOARD
x orK.... Jiiignieen mem
bers of the national Board of Dir
ectors of the National Associat
ion for the Advancement of Col
ored People were elected at tho
thirty-thi-d a~nual meeting of the
Association in the New York of
fice. Monday, January 5.
They are: Mrs. Lillian A. Ale:;-,
antler, New York; Louis C. Blount
Detroit, Michigan; Harry E. Da
vis, Cleveland, Ohio; Roscoe Dun
jee, Oklahoma City, Okla.; Dr.
John B. Hall, Boston, Mass.; Dr.
John Haynes Holmes, New York,
Hon. Herbert H. Lehman, New
York; Alfred Baker Lewis, Peek
skill, New York; Eugene M. Mar
tin, Atlanta, Ga.; Isadore Martin,
Philadelphia, Pa.; Miss L. Pearl
Mitchell, Cleveland, Ohio; Hon.
Charles Poletti, New York; T. G.
Nuter, Charleston, W. Va.; Mrs.
Amy E Spingarn, New York; Dr.
E. W. Taggart, Birmingham, Ala,
Dr. John M. Tinsley, Richmond,
Va.; Major Robert E. Treman, Ith
aca, New York; Bishop VV. J.
Walls, Chicago, 111.
The three new members of the
NAACP board are Dr. John B.
Hall of Boston; Dr. John M. Tins
ley, Richmond and Bishop W. J,
Walls, Chicago.