The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, May 10, 1941, City Edition, Image 1

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/JUSTICES EQUALITY ^OALLTHE NEWS WHILE IT IS NEWS HEW .TO wicWjjH,
j^Nngp ^"LARGEST ACCREDITED NEGRO NEWSPAPER WEST OF CHICAGO AND NORTH OF KANSAS CITY —MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED NEGRO PRESS
Entered as Second-Class Matter at The Post office, Omaha, Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska, Saturday May 10,1941 OUR 14th YEAR—No. 8—City Edition; 5c Copy
Under Act of March 8, 1874—Business Phone: WE. 1517_ ’ -
ST. JOHN’S CHURCH GOES OVER THE TOP
RAISE $2,414.40 TO
ACHIEVE GREAT
FINANCIAL VICTORY
Streamline Banquet Huge Success; Nets
$300.00 More
• ••
Building To Be Completed In Time
For General AME. Conference
In The Early Part of Next Vail
PHILADELPHIA NYA. CHORUS
Jules Bledsoe
Nell Hunter
$15.00 ANI) COSTS
In police court Saturday Gover
nor Avant, 2432 Parker Street,
was fined $15.00 and costs on a
chaige of speeding, and his driver
license was suspended for six
months.
THREE UPS IN
STYLE NOW!
Dig Up, Paint Up am!
Rake Up!!!
Patronize your neighborhood
store. Three Up’s in style. It is
time to rake up, dig up, paint up
and plant down. Remember we
carry a full line of all kinds of
tools for your garden, lawn and
the very best line of interior and
exterior paints. Free delivery ev
ery hour. Elsewhere in this pap
er you will find a coupon. Clip
this coupon. It is worth 25c to
you in trade at H. Dolgoff’s Hard
ware Co., at 24th Street at Parker.
FINED 25.50 AND COSTS
Ernest Lomax, 2517 Franklin St.
was lined $2.50 and costs by Judge
Battin Wednesday, on a charge of
speeding.
DISMISSED
The case of David Watson, 2105
Hamilton, who was arrested on a
charge of “jitneying” was dismis
sed by Judge Battin in police
cou.’t Friday.
ARRESTED FOR SPEEDING
The case of George Barton, 27,
of 2!.2i Lake Street, who was ar
rested on a charge of speeding was
continued to May 6.
> RED-NETWORK TO CARRY OUTSTANDING
NEGRO ARTISTS OVER CHAIN
SUNDAY, MAY 11TH
To Broadcast From The Hyde Park Home of the
President; Mrs. Roosevelt To Speak
The nation-wide radio broadcast!
of the NYA Negro Mixed Chorus
of Philadelphia on May 11 over the
Red Network of the National
Broadcasting Company featuring
the appearance of Jules Bledsoe,
world famous baritone, will high
light the activities of this musical
group which is now enterng its 6th
year.
This broadcast will originate
from the Hyde Park home of Pres
ident Roosevelt and will be heard
between the hours of 6:30 and 6 p
m., Eastern Daylight Saving Time
Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt will
speak during the broadcast.
A feature of this program by
the National Youth Administrat
ion will be the performance of Jul
es Bledsoe’s “Ode To America” for
the first time on the air. Mr.
Bledsoe, world famous Negro bari
tone, will sing the solo part of this
composition which he has dedicated
to the President
The National Youth Administra
tion’s Philadelphia Negro Mixed
Chorus was organized on April 6,
1.936, under the direction of Dr. W.
Franklin Hoxter. More than 50
Negro youth, between the ages of
18 and 25 who were eligible for
NYR part-time employment and
who expressed an interest in mus
ic, were assigned to the project.
Some of them had previous exper
ience in voice culture, however,
the majority of them were untrain
ed but wanted the opportunity to
learn to express themselves in
song.
A fir*st step, the group was en
couraged to suggest to the direc
tor the songs they wished to sing
and to make up their own urog
rams. From the material a sched
ule of songs was made and lessons
in sight reading were begun to
teach the youth to recognize tun
es. Then followed vocal exercises
to improve both tone and control
of the voice, In short time the
group was able to do three and
four part singing of simple 30ngs.
Classes in music appreciation,
History of Music and English were
gradually added, with some of the
youth advancing to the point
where they requested courses in
Harmony and Composition and in
dividual training for solo public
performances.
The purposes for the organizat
ion of the Choral Project were as
follows:
1. To give the youth an oppor
tunity to learn something worth
while about the kind of music that
best meets his needs, that makes
for better citizenship, and better
community relations.
2. To discover and encourage
youth with unusual musical talent
and help them equip themselves
for employment in the entertain
ment industry.
This special broadcast is under
the general supervision of Mrs.
Nell Hunter who has a distinguish
ed record in the field of choral
music and who is choral consult
ant to the National Youth Admin
istration. Mrs. Hunter has ar
ranged four of the numbers which
are to be included on the May 11
program.
In addition to Jules Bledsoe’s
Ode to America, the musical por
tion of the program will include:
(“Hold On,” “De Ole Ark’s A-mov
erin’,” "Go Down Moses,” “I’m
Trampin’,” “Somebody’s Knockin’
at your Door,” and “I’m So Glad”.
WRITE
Your Congressman
TODAY!!!
(Special to The Omaha Guide —
My Dear Editor:—Many of the
major Negro organizations, a$,you
may know, have been lending ac
tive support to the campaign to
pass the Geyer-P*pper Anti-Poll
Tax Bill. The National Associat
ion for the Advancement of Color
ed People, the National Urban
League, the National Negro Con
gress, the IBPOE., Alpha Kappa
Alpha and other groups have all
been using their influence to res
tore the right to vote to the sou
thern people.
At the present time, the anti
poll tax bill is bottled up in the
House Judiciary Committee whose
chairman is Hon. Haton Sumners
of poll tax Texas. To bring the
bill before the House for a vote, it
will be necessary to obtain the
signatures of 218 congressmen on
a petition to discharge the House
Judiciary Committee from consid
eration of the bill. I have filed
such a petition, and am now at
tempting to get the required num
ber of signatures.
I am writing you this urgent
letter to request that you publish
an editorial or an article in your
newspaper suggesting that your
readers write their congressman
to sign Discharge Petition No. 1,
and to vote for H. R. 1024 and al
so to ask that you write as an in
dividual to your Congressman- I
am confident if the Negro voters
especially in the Northern and
border states bring all of their ;n
influence to bear at the anti-poll
tax bill can be passed. You will
recall that the anti-lynching bill
passed the Mouse last year with
the support of 262 congressmen.
If the same congressmen will sup
port the anti-poll tax bill, I am
sure that it will be possible for
the bill with the bill with the back
ing of Senator Pepper of Florida,
to scale the hurdle in the Senate.
I am sure that it is not neces
sary for me to stress to you the
significance to the Negro voter of
removing one of the obstacles to
his participation in elections. If
A TRIBUTE TO
MOTHERS
(by Mrs. H. Wiggins)
We all know that every day is
Mother’s Day. However we ate
very happy to join our voice for
this Special Day in honoring Mo
therhood all over the world.
Mother, who through great suf
fering made it possible for us to
share this one big experience call
ed life. She cared for us When we
were helpless babes; guided our
tottering footsteps, and kissed n
way the tears and hurts of the
bumps- Often far into the night,
she sat by the bedside soothing
our feverish brow. She taught ns
to pray. Hers were the first
arms, the first cares and the first
love that we knew. She has stood
by to council, to guide and to en
courage until we were able to take
care of ourselves.
Someone recently wrote, Her
moulding touches are so soft, so
gentle and so delicate that they
find a ready response in the hearts
and lives of her children."
Another has said:
“Into our lives she is constantly
pouring her own life in the prac
tice of the great principles of
character”.
We pause today to pay homage
to the memory of our departed
mothers and to pledge anew in
creased devotion to those who are
still with us.
This occasion then gives us an
opportunity to croWn uncrowned
queen of civilization—Our Moth
ers.
we are successful in abolishing the
poll tax, it will provide the impetus
for guaranteeing to the Southern
Negro all of his civil rights.
Sincerely yours,
LEE E. GEYER
YWCA CAR’ER
CONFERENCE
The YWCA, will conduct its 6th
Annual Career Conference May 9,
to 11. All affiliating agencies
will assist in sponsoring this con
ference. The Fellowship Dinner
is only 16 cents per person. It
will be held Friday at six o’clock
at the Northside branch. There
will be a Panel Discussion on
Youth What Next? led by Mi«s
Walterine Wright. On Saturday
the City of Omaha will be shown
to the young people on iour3
which will begin $t 9 o’clock.
In Divorce Court—
STANLEY Versus.
STANLEY
Grace Stanley, plaintiff, vs.
Richard Stanley, defendant, pet
ition: Comes now the plaintiff and
for cause of action against the de
fendant alleges:
1. That plaintiff and defend
ant are residents of Omaha, Doug
las County, Nebraska and have
resided in said County since tl'.eir
marriage at Fremont, Nebraska
on May 5, 1925: that the charges
of cruelty as hereinafter set out
all occurred within this state.
2. That one child has been born
as the result of this union, name
ly, Donald, bom September 15,
1934.
That the community property
consists of household furniture
and fixtures now located at 2728
Burdette Street, Omaha, Nebraska
3. That plaintiff has always
conducted herself toward the de
fendant as a chaste, loving wife
and dutiful mother, that nothv/ith
standing her conduct defendant
has been guilty of acts of extreme
cruelty toward plaintiff and have
been such as to utterly destroy
the’ marriage relation.
These acts of cruelty will be set
out more definite if requested by
(Continued on pageUg^”2)
I IN THE CASE OF BIRDIE BROWN VERSUS
| CATHERYN ESSEX
COURT GRANTS CLAIM OF
CATHERYN ESSEX
Deceased Property In Sister’s
Name Is Awarded To Widow
The Nebraska Supreme Court
on April 25, 1941 rendered an op
inion in the case of Mrs- Birdie
Brown, against Mrs. Catheryn Es
sex.
The case involved the question
of title to certain property in So.
Omaha, valued at about $4,000.00.
Some years ago Charles Essex
and Catheryn Essex operated a
place of business and a resort in
South Omaha, From their joint
efforts the property above referr
ed to was purchased, but title to
the property was taken in the
name of Birdie Brown, the sister
of Charles Essex.
Charles Essex died, and Cath
eryn Essex claimed that she had
furnished all the money with which
to purchase the property, which
had been deede-d to Birdie Brown
After the death of Charles Es
sex Mr. Jess Hutten, was appoint
ed administrator of the estate of
Charles Essex and he sought to
j win the title by court decree for
Birdie Brown.
When the case was tried in the
District Court, Judge Frank Din
een decided that Catheryn Essex
was entitled to the property and
entered a decree accordingly and
the Supreme Court of Nebraska
affirmed the judgement of the
District Court and awarded all the
property to Catheryn Essex.
Messrs John Adams Jr., and Jess
Hutten were attorneys for Ji die
Brown and Boyle and Boyle were
the attorneys for Catheryn Essex.
FINED $850.00 FOR VIOLATING
LIQUOR LAWS AND KEEPING
DISORDERLY HOUSE
Edward Perry, 63, of 6024 Sout«>
25th Street .was given fines total
ling $86000 by Municipal Judge
Battin Monday on charges of vio
lating the state liquor laws and
keeping a disorderly house.
BOUND OVER TO DISTRICT
COURT
Bessie Hamilton, 21, was bound
over Monday to District Court for
trial on a first degree murder
charge after she shot and killed
William Marcus Young, 43, at
3018 R Street on April 26.
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FREE
HEALTH
CLINICS
AT URBAN LEAGUE AND
WOODSON CENTER
The Steering Committee of the State De
fense Commission, headed by Atty. Chas. F.
Davis, and working with Atty. Ray L. Williams,
member of The State Defense Commission, An
nounced this week that a FREE Tuberculin Skin
Testing Clinic would be held at both the Urban
League and Woodson Center on—
MONDAY, MAY 12, 7 P.M.
The sponsors of these clinics are the State
Health Department, the Nebraska Tuberculosis
Assn., the Nebraska Negro Medical Society and
the Negro Nurses. Anyone who wishes to take
advantage of this health service is invited to go
to one of these age,ncies.
The Health officials hope that it may be the
means of preventing many cases of serious ill
ness in this community.
The Clubs, auxiliaries and many
other organizations of the Church
have revived that famous “Each
for AH, and All for Each” spirit
which has been the incentive for
much achievement in the AME.
Church General. Never in the
past 20 years has this church had
a more successful rally than the
one which terminated Sunday,
May 4. At the morning service
approximately $1,050 was report
ed. Such thankfulness as was
manifested, could only have been
deeply felt by those who contrib
uted to that fund in some way.
However, it was the Sunday night
report that threw Bishop Noah
Williams, Rev. Sears, officers,
members and friends into such a
jubilant spirit that the very foun
dations of the church almost danc
ed with glee. The report of $2,
414.40 climaxed a 4 month’s rally
whose goal was to retire the
church mortgage and to complete
the structure.
The feature of the day was the
presence of Bishop Noah W. Wil
liams of St. Louis, Mo., At the
morning services Back To Bethel
was introduced. Ministers, mem
bers and friends of other churches
were guests of St. John during the
afternoon assemblage.
The need for "Light Within’’
was expounded into the necessity
of intellectual light of spiiltual
light and moral light The Israel
ites had light in their dwellings.
We too, must have ‘light” in every
phase of our existence. It must
be the light of a vision to go for
ward in any endeavor.
The contractor who will comp
lete the upper structure of the edi
fice, says that the building will
be ready for occupancy by early
fall in time for General Confer
ence. 1 • \ ”
ST. JOHN AME. ^TREAMLINE
BANUET —TREMENDOUS
SUCCESS—
Over three hundred persons
were present at the Mortgage
burning. Monday night, May 5th.
Presiding at the occasion was Mr.
Gilbert of the Omaha Star. Guests
for the evening included Mayor
Butler, other officials of the city
and ministers of various churches.
Mayor Butler assisted in burn
ing of the mortgage. Over $o00
was raised from the banquet.
OMAHA GUIDE’S
$300 SCHOLAR
SHIP CONTEST
For Subscriptions Begins
Monday, May 12th—
It is a popularity vote contest in
which 12 eligible girls will com
pete for 12 prizes. Each girl will
have a sponsor who will boost his
or her charge towards winning
the first prize of $100, a trip to
Chicago and one year’s work in
news and subscription dept- at a
reasonable salary if she is qualif
ied. The second prize is $75.
To be eligible for the prizes,
contestants must have a sponsor
and must secure at least 50 sub
scribers. The other prizes are as
follows:
First Prize .$100.00
econd Prize .75.00
Third Prize .50.00
Fourth Prize .25.00
Fifth Prize .15.00
Sixth Prize .10.00
Seventh Prize .10.00
Eighth Prize .5.00
Ninth Prize .5.00
Tenth Prize .5.00
$300.00
Details of popularity votes will
be announced later.
All contestants will receive 10
percent of total sales if no prize is
won.