The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, February 01, 1941, City Edition, Image 1

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    I
*ln 41)E
/JUSTICE/EQUALITY JEW.TO THEUNE^
LARGEST ACCREDITED NEGRO NEWSPAPER WEST OF CHICAGO AND NORTH OF KANSAS CITY —MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED NEGRO PRESS
Entered as Second-Class Matter at The Post office, Omaha, Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska, Saturday, February 1, 1941 OUR 13th YEAR—No. 46,— City Edition^ C:py 5c
Under Act of March 8, 1874—Business Phone: WE. 1817_
r -—————————————————^—^——a—————
ROY WHITE NAMED STATE
OIL. FUEL INSPECTOR
CHASE REQUESTS NEGROES BE PUT IN ALL
KEY DEPARTMENTS
(INTERVIEW BY WM. GLENN)
Roy M. White, 1708 North 27th
Street is Governor Griswold's
choice for inspector in the Depart
ment of Motor Fuels, it was ann
ounced today by Jackson B. Chase
the Governor’s campaign manager
during the last election.
Chase said today, he has rec
ommended to the new Republican
administration, to givp Negroes
jobs in every state department in
cluding the Custodian department.
Due to the outstate officials not
knowing much about Negroes,
Jackson B- Chase states that it is
very much necessary that the Om
aha party officials take the init
lative in going to the bat for col
ored people to get their share of
state jobs.
He said although he is not in the
official capacity to say what will
be done, however it is his duty to
ask.
Chase declared he was writing a
letter to Dr. Miller, State Health
Director today( telling him hDW
important it was that he appoint
at least three Negroes in his dep
artment.
The Colored citizens have al
ways been placed at the bottom cf
the heap in the past. A practice
which has been uhfair and must be
stopped, he stated.
LOCAL BRANCH OF NAACP.
ADOPTS RESOLUTION
To Abolish Discrimination Against Americans
of Color In The Armed Forces, of the U. S.
The Local Branch of The NAA
CP. held a very successful meet
ing at St. John AME. Church, Sun
day afternoon at 3:30 p. m. Mr.
H. J. Pinkett being the principal
speaker; his topic being the “Ne
gTO in the Defense Industries”.
Very interesting remarks were
made by J. Westbrook McPherson
who introduced Mr- Pinkett.
The President, Mr. Arthur B.
McCaw held a 10 minute forum
after the speaking Those taking
part were Senator John Adams, Jr
Rev. Moody, S. E. Gilbert, Rev. F.
C. Williams, Dr. W. W„ Peeblais,
Mir Y- W. Logan.
The membership committee
comprised of Charles Solomon,
chairman and Mrs. Gertrude Lucas
Craig .secretary made a very fine
report of $42.00. Special comm
endation was paid Mr. Goldie Da
vis and Mr. E. W. McCowan, who
turned in their full quota of mem
berships.
St. John’s Choir under the lead
ership of Mrs- Pearl Gibson rend
ered some very beautiful numbers.
A Resolution was drawn up to be
forwarded to our President, which
reads as follows:
RESOLUTION—
It is hereby resolved by the O
maha Branch of the NAACP. that
it -is -the sense of this body that
the President of these Un’ted
States, the senators and Congress
men use their position and author
ity to abolish discrimination a
gainst Americans of Color, in our
armed forces and in all defense in
dustries. If there is a lack of le
gal authority, then it should be
supplied by Congress.
Respectfully submitted.
Arthur B .McCaw, Pres^ John
i Adams, Jr., Atty., H. J. Pinkett,
Chrm-, Rev. L. A. Story, Ruth
I Payne J. Wrist brook MlcPher3on.
CLEAVES TO
BE HOST
To Annual Goodwill
Spring Musical
—(BY L. L. McVAY)—
The presidents of the choirs who
took an active part in last year’s
‘‘Goodwill Spring Musical’’ met at
the home of L. L. McVay, the foun
der of the movement and voted
that Cleaves Temple CMIE. choir
will be host for this, the 7th An
nual Musical.
We hope all choirs will work
hard on* their Easter programs so
when the rehearsals are called for
the musicalf that all choirs will be
ready to attend- The work will
be made much easier when all
make the rehearsals at the same
time.
Mrs. Pearl Gibson and Mrs. Ma
ble Avant and Mr. E. L. Young
have been asked to be the musical
directors for this year. We hope
all will show the interest in these
young directors as was shown by
the presidents of the choirs last
Sunday in their meeting.
There are choirs that have work
ed some years before, but did not
take part in the last two programs
To those, we say, we shall always
be glad to have you come back to
us.
The date this year will be the
——
I same as years before. The iast
j Sunday in April, which will be Ap
ril 27. It is hoped that no one
will have anything to conflict with
this date, and all Omaha and Lin
coln can look forward to this days
as one of great Christian fellow
ship between the churches and
their choirs.
You will read more about this
day in The Omaha Guide as the
time draws near.
Let us not forget our slogan,
"Bigger and Better Each Year”,
and our motto, “Work with 100*
Spirit of Solidarity".
CHATTANOOGA SCHOOL
TRAINS HOUSE BOYS
AND CHAUFFEURS
Chattanooga, Jan. 28 (ANP)—
For the first time in the history
of the local school system, a course
in vocational home mechanics is
now being offered at Second Jun
ior High School, for colored. The
course is designed to train boys
for chauffeurs, butlers and general
house and yard men
The boys are taught to repair
and refinish furniture, patch plas
ter, paint floors and do other jobs
around the house- Those taking
the chauffeur course are taught to
read road maps, estimate gas mil
eage, and wash and grease car3,
All are instructed how to prepare
breakfast—and to wash the dishes
and pans when the meal is over.
.-—6
REGARDLESS OF RUMORS YOU MAY
HAVE HEARD, WE ARE NOT MOV1NG-WE
WILL BE HERE TO SERVE YOU IN THE
FUTURE -THE SAME AS IN THE PAST.
YOUR PATRONAGE APPRECIATED
—Lyle S. Hin'es, Mgr.
F.MFRSON: SARATOGA
LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS
2324 North Twenty-Fourth Street
PHONE WEbster 1029
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FOR THE CHAIRMANSHIP OF THE
NATIONAL REPUBLICAN PARTY
WE NOMINATE f
jti,iuiiiiiiniii!n!ifiniNiii!iiiinHii!!iniiiniiiiiiiiM!imi!Hiin!iiii!im!ii!iiiiiinmn!ii!iin!iii!iiiiii!!"iinniniiiiiii!!:i!!iii':i!!iii!!!!!i!i:ii!!r:iii;v imiinmtJiiuntKH
Hon. rable Senator Kenneth S. Wherry
SENATOR KENNETH S. WHERRY
CHAIRMAN OF THE REPUBLICAN
STATE CENTRAL COMMITTEE
OF NEBRASKA
The Hon. Joseph Martin, Jr., is ready to quit as
Chairman of the Republican National Committee.
The Hon. Kenneth S. Wherry is ready to take the job
and do for the Republican party in! every state in the
Union in 1942 and 1944 what he did f >r the, Repub
lican Party in every county in the state <of Nebraska
in 1940. The proof of the pudding is in the eating.
Now Mr. National Committeeman and Committee
woman, while you sojourn in our state these two days
we beg of you to go dlown to our capital city at Lin
coln, Nebraska, and go through our State Capitol
Building and you will find the Republican Party eat
ing the pudding. After many years of state Demo
cratic lamd-slides and control of our state political
machinery, We Republicans in the state of Nebraska
to the man, believe in the leadership of Kenneth S.
Wherry. WHY? Because we know him. We have
watched him from a boy on the playgrounds, t) our
Capitol Building as a Senator, and to the leadership
I of the Republican Party c f the Stnte of Nebraska.
Now, we are asking you, wmie you are in oui
state, to get acquainted with this hard-hittng, en
thusiastic worker’s leadership. Learn to know him
as we in Nebraska know him and then you will say
what the distinguished Nebraska Republicans are
saying today. Such distinguished Republicans as
Robert Smith, Abe Shjtwell, Tom Sheehan, Bert Car
penter, Lyle Jackson, J. E. Davidson, Senator Butler,
Governor Dwight Griswold, Morris Jacobson,
and many others whom time and space will not per
mit us to name, in fact the whole state of Nebraska’s
Republicans beg of you today, to learn of Kenneth
S. Wherry’s leadership, if you are interested in the
future of American Democracy. Robert Smith says,
I quote, “We know what it will mean to the Republic
an Party in these United States to make Kenneth S.
Wherry our National Committee Chairman. We Ne
braska Republicans to the man, expect to do every
thing in our power to get the 48 states’ National
Committeemen and Committee-Women to elect Sen
ator Kenneth S. Wherry as f,ur National Chairman.’’
Ndw, Mr. National Committee-man and woman
“PUT US IN HELL
We Will Work Our Way Out”
-SAYS DOCTOR THOMAS
ADMIRAL SAYS NEGROES
‘TOO INTELLIGENT’
WOULD DOMINATE NAVY IF ENLISTED
NMA Committee Confers with Knox and Officials;
Secretary Says ‘Putting Colored in Navy Like Putt
ing Them in Hell’ But Considers Black Marines for
Bases In West Indies
INSTAL’ATION
SERVICES
of Rev. Blackmore To
Be Held Sunday Feb. 2
Services for the Installation of
the Rev. J. E. Blackmore as Pas
tor of Hillside Presbyterian church
will b? conducted Sunday Febr
uary 2, 1941, at the Presbyterian
Church 30th and Ohio Sts.
The following is the program for
the services with the Rev. Carl E.
Keams( D. D , presiding
Organ prelude. „ Doxology*
Invocation Anthem
Hymn 301
Sermon, Rev. Thomas R .Niven
Statement by Presiding Elder
Question to the Pastor Elect
Question ho th* People
Announcement of Installation
Charge to the Pastor, Rev- John
W. Pressky, D. D.
Charge to the People, Rev. William
H Phelps, D. D.
Installation Prayert Rev. Elwood
A. Rowsey, D- D.
Hymn 365
Benediction by Pastor
Welcome by Pastor
CAPT M’GREW
Will Address American
Legion Monday Night
Capt MeGrew, USA., recruiting
officer for the 7th Corps Area,
will speak at Roosevelt Post Am
erican Legion Hdqtrs., on Monday
evening at 8 p. m.
Capt. McGrew will show tht
motion picture “The Army on
Wheels”. This is a very thrilling
and informative picture and should
be of vital interest to all citizens
and particularly to those comtem
plating into the army.
Capt. McGrew is recruiting 32
Colored men for the Quartermas
ter’s corps who will serve at Fort
Crook. Thig branch of the service
assures a man of security after
leaving the army. For in this
branch of the service, he is taught
the handling of all mechanized
eqnuipment'^ particularly automo
biles and tractors.
9 WASHINGTON, Jan. 28 (ANP>
If Negroes were to be allowed to
enlist in the navy, they would be
"so superior in general to the
whites who enlist that they would
have to be made petty officers and
the enlisted whites would no*
stand for this,” Admiral C. W Ni
mitz told a special committee from
the National Medical Assoeia'ion
which recently met here with high
| ranking naval officers on the color
bar in this branch of the armed
1 forces.
Secretary of the Navy Frank
Knox reiterated earlier statements
that it would be 'impractical’ 'to
use the two races in the navy, de
claring that “putting Negroes in
the navy would be like putting
them in hell,” but did promise to
seriously consider using Negro
marines for the new naval bases
in the West Indies leased from
Great Britain
Those taking part in the confer
ence were Dr. Jloscoe C. Giles,
Chicago, chairman o fthe liason
committee; Dr. William MeKinley
Thomas Leavenworth, Kan., chair
man of the executive board; Dr.
G- Hamilton Francis, Norfolk, Va.
speaker for the house of delegates
Dr. W. G. Alexander, Orange, N.
J., chairman commission on public
health, all of the NMA.. and Secy.
Knox, Admiral Nimitzt Capt. Clark
and a captain in charge of naval,
enlistmens> representing the U. S
navy. Details of the conference, j
held on Jan 8, were not revealed
until this week.
Dr. Giles .after calling attention |
to Col. Knox’s statement that a I
Negro could be enlisted only us a j
messman, pointed to the race’s rec- ■
ord as gunners under Admiral
Perryi Admiral Farragut and at
Saratoga and Manila in the Span
ish American war. He termed *he
attitude an ‘‘innovation” and said
it was resented in speeches and
radio broadcasts by liberal whites
and Negroes, pointed to the grow
ing sense of justice even in the
South and the liberal record of the
Knox newspaper, the Chicago Dai
ly News.
In hie reply, Sec’y Knox declar
ed, ‘‘We have our problems; we
are all sufficiently intelligent to
know we must be realists, if we
put Negroes in the navy it would
be like putting them in hell. The
relationships on shipboard ure
(continued on pageJ3^=,2)
again we Nebraska Republicans say to you, please
get acquainted with Kenneth S. Wherry today, learn
something about his ability to lead and weld all fac
tions solidly together for the good of American De
mocracy, and if you do this you will go back to your
home state tiomrrow just as determined to elect
Kenneth S. Wherry your National Committee Chair
man as we Republicans here in Nebraska are today.
If the Republican National Committeemen and wom
en will let Kenneth S. Wherry have the reins of the
National Republican chariot, he will drive it to vic
tory by electing Republican Representatives and
Senators to a working quorum in 1942 and our Rep
ublican Presidential nominee in 1944. Let us all put
our hands to his shoulders and push him to the top.
He has the ability, he is honest of purpose, and pos
sesses to the stick-4.o-it-iveness and determination to
carry his program to a successful end. Above all, he
is a hard worker, and he can work with all men and
women who are interested in the welfare of Ameri
can Dem cracy as our forefathers laid it down to us
in the Constitution of the United States.
WILL FIGHT
NOMINATION
OF BYRNES
IF NAMED FOR HIGH
JUSTICE POST
• • •
New York—A long and bitter
fight, reminiscent of the campaign
waged against Judge John J. Par
ker that kept the North Carol ira
Jurist off the United States Sup
reme Court in 1930, will be con
ducted against Senator James
Brynes, if President Roosevelt
nominates the South Carolina Re
presentative to fill the post left
va ant by retiring Justice James
C. McReynolds .officials of the
National Asjociation for the Ad
viUK-i-ment e’ Cu'tred Peop o 3aid
today
The announcement came on the
heels of newspaper report) from
Washington indicating that Sen
ator Brynes, o.ie of the President^,
cinef aides in tin fight to pass tne
lease-lend bill, had the inside track
or the appj:itment, and quoting
the President a* saying that he
hrd already chosen the man whe
would succm-’i McReynold»i al
though he did not intend to make
krown the name for several
weeks.
At the same ! me the association
11.ode public % telegram sent to
K<osevelt, January 24, in which
versons for the opposition to
Fivnes were *t».d. These reu
cm. Were summed up with the
statement that Drynes "has been
ai solutely oo lsistent in opposing
any and eve^-y effort to give u.
Negro citizens tne protection of
the United States Constitution
Brynes has consistently fought
passage 01 the federal Anti-Lynch
ir.g bill, the statement said. In
1936, as chairman of the Senate
audit and control committee, he re
fused to permit consideration of
the appropriation of $7,600, to in
vestigate fourteen lynchings that
had taken place since May 1, when
the Senate filibuster halted action
on the then pending Costigar.
Wagner anti-lynching bill. Bryn
es did this despite the fact that tne
Senate Judiciary Committee had
reported out favorably a resolut
ion offered by Senator Frederick
Van Nuys, calling for the investi
gation, and authorizing the expen
diture^ of 7,500 to conduct, it.
NAACP. officials pointed out
that it is not without significance
that the three Senators who are
pressing Roosevelt to name Brynes
Carter Glass, of Va-, Harrison of
Miss., and Alben Barkley of Ken
tucky, are without exception op
ponents of federal anti-lynching
legislation.
Senator Glass, the NAACP. of
ficials said, is the father of dis
franchisement laws for Negroes n
Virginia, about whch he has fre
quently boasted
The association urged organit
ations Rnd citizens to send tele
grams, post cards and letters to
President Roosevetl at once, urg
ing him not to nominate Brynes
for the Supreme Court post.
The complete text of the Assoc
iation’s telegram to Roosevelt fol
lows:
"We very sincerely hope that
newspaper reports are incorrect
that you are seriously considering
the nomination of Senator James
F. Brynes, as member of United
States Supreme Court to succeed
Mr. Justice McReynolde. Sena
tor Brynes record has been absol
utely consistent in opposing1 any
any every effort to give to Negro
citizens the protection of the Unit
ed States Constitution- The Uni
*d States Supreme Court has been
the one tribunal to which minorit
ies have been able to appeal in de
fense of their Citizenship rights.
One holding the view's which
Senator Brynes has espoused on
the floor of the United States Sen
ate and elsev^here^ jeopardizes
democracy at a time when we
must put forth every .effort to
safeguard and extent it. We urge
that Senator Brynes or any other
person sharing his views not be
considered for this high post."
MO. LEGISLATORS APPROPRI
ATE FUNDS FOR L. U. JOURN
ALISM COURSE
Ji-fferson City, Mo., Jan 26—An
appropriation of $65,000 for the
establishment of journalism cours
es at Lincoln University was made
this week by the state House of
Representatives. The measure
now goes to the Senate.
Plans are that journalism will
be taught at L- U. beginning the
second semester, in February.
SUFFERS HEAD
LACERATIONS
Susie Lee, 2502 Burdette S'reet
suffered a head laceration and a
sprain.d neck when she slipp.-d
and feU w’hile alighting from a
Street car &at 24th and Farnam
Street. She was attended at th.
Nicholas Senn hospital and taken
home.