The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, July 29, 1939, City Edition, Page 9, Image 9

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COLONEL HUSH i lFiT - FIFT Y - By SCHEEI
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JUNIOR PATROL B? QUIN HALL
S JUNIOR. BVEBQC HEDGE
§g / PROMISE TO HELP THOSE LESS TOmjNATE
? 77/4 A/ / /W
/ PROMISE 70 STUDY hard.
I / PROMISE TO BE CAREPUL BREN CROSSlAJCr
" STREET AND TO AO THOSE TAJ DANGER..
3 / EROM/SE TO BE P/ND ID DUMB AU/MALS
jz PROMISE. 70 RUN ERRANDS H/UUR6LY
l PROMISE TO BE TRUTHFUL -
/ PROMISE TO EO EUERYTH/m FOSSTSLE
TO LURE MY BRENTS PROUD OP ME..
SIGNED._
ADDRESS_
CttEOP BK7TH___ -
HERE'S A VOTE EOR r<SOSH.'.' DJER'gODV)^’^ SOST YOURE RI6KH SPIKE 'COURSE 11= You ViiwYHOMJ >
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F RON NOBUX By JACK THOMAS
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^OVE- 1M FLA1TEREO NO J * TAKING ME FOR A fVE AN IDEA- VLL WE-BENT-EM
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C/^J-.^SEE Y°W. TSS J 8 -- f\_L MEET YOU THAT DATE-EVEN AUTO CO.
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INTERNATIONAL CARTOON CO. N Y Ccww J
UU TUU KNUW WHY - - - All This Is Foolisn tflll Nearly IflIB i Drawn for this paper By Fisher
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WHEN NOU VISIT NouG WIPES Relative S
VOU'RE MERELN ’NACVS HUSBAND"
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Beg. UTS. P«t. Off. /t
BEAUTY
The Larieuse Beauty Foundation was established by
the Godefroy Manufacturing Company to study methods
of preserving women's natural beauty, and to mz' e
the results of this research available to the public.
••HAIR-CONDITION" YOURSELF FOR SUMMER
Summer is the hardest time of
the year on the hair. We live a
carefree, careless existence In the
summer and often fail to take even
the simplest precautions to preserve
our beauty. It is usually so hot that
we let our beauty routine slip and as
a result we end up In September
looking thoroughly unkempt und It
takes most of the winter to get hack
In condition.
Keep Hair Clean
Hair, to he beautiful, must he
healthy and healthy hair must be
clean and well-brushed. To save
yourself the added chore of recondi
tioning your lmlr In Hie fall, work
out a routine of care and stick to
It. Select the best time of day to
brush your hair and keep at It sys
tematically regardless of the tem
perature. Shampoo your lmlr as of
ten ns necessary. Don’t think Hint
because you washed your hair every
two weeks in winter, once every two
weeks will he sufficient now. Your
hair gets hot und sticky In summer
and needs to be washed oftener. The
simplest hulrdress looks well if your
hair Is Immaculately clean.
If your hulr Is naturally dry. you
may find oil shampoos beneficial, es
pecially during the summer months.
Sun mid wind are drying to the hair
und scalp, at best, and if your hair
is dry to start out with, the results
may be disastrous. It is a wise rule
never to go out in the sun without a
hat or some sort of covering over
your head. The sun has a tendency
to bleach and streak the hair, mak
ing your "crown of glory” look for
all the world like u tabby cat. *
Reconditioning Suggestions
Tf my warning lias come too late, •
however, here are a few suggestions
which may help repair the damage.
Olive oil is tin effective and Inex
pensive aid to parched scalps. Rub
it in the scalp and leave it in over
night for the best results. Then,
If your hair 1ms become streaked
from over-exposure to the sun, a
good hair coloring will quickly re
store it to its original shade. Be
sure that you select a coloring that
exactly matches the original shade
so Hint as your hair grows in you
will lie unable to distinguish where
the coloring stops and your natural
colored hair begins.
Remember that soft, gleaming
linir is one of the greatest assets a
woman can have. Don’t spoil your
chances by failing to tuke the
proper precautions.
What are your beauty prob
lems? Write Marie Donning,
Larieuse Beauty Foundation,
Room 321 — 319 North Fourth
St., St. Louis, Mo., and she will
be glad to answer them. Be sure
to enclose a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
4 ■" ...
Opals For Luck
By Ann Joyce
They were both young and evli
dently very much in love, these tv,4
prospective customers who werf
.looking over the display of scan
kplns st Stows A Wells JewelrJ
I store.
"Oh, John, there’s s beauty 1'
exclaimed the girl. "Tbs one wltl
tbs pearl setting."
"But look at the one next to it
Alice," replied the young man
"Why. It's alive! It'a on fire!"
“Of course It Is, John. It’s an
opal. But you don't want an opal
Bad luck, you know.
The young man Jaughea. “There’s
no such thing, dearest Not sines
you're wearing my ring. Ah, there’s
Mr. Stowe."
"May we see that lovely pearl
pin in the case?" Alice requested.
"I wan* to buy one for—”
“For me,” finished the young
man. “Yo. remember. Mr. Stowe,
you sold me s solitaire the other
day."
"And I'm wearing it," laughed
the girl as she (tripped off her
glovo. “But about the scarf pin.
John. Don't you like the pearl
setting?
"I prefer the opal, Alice, uut
year choice le mine.”
“Both the same price," the Jewel
er told them.
"But an opal, John! I’ve always
heard—”
“NonEense, dear. Is there really
any bad luck attached to an opal,
Mr. Stowe?"
"Absolutely none," replied the
Jeweler. "And there’s no store
more—alive, ae you put It. Tra
pearl pin la beautiful, too, but some
foolish people say pearls mean
tears. Both superstitions.”
"Ws’ll take the opal, Mr. Stowe.”
decided Alice, "and defy the bad
luqi.”
“If you never have any more bad
luck than tbla opal brings you.
young people, you’ll never have
any,” remarked Mr. Stofte as be
wrapped up the flaming jewel. —
It was soon after the purchase of
the omjl pin that thing* began to
happen! —
First Alice lost ClyUe, her Pek
inese. Clytie was returned after a
few days but those few days were
harrowing onea for Alice.
An engagement present from a
rich sunt was broken when It ar
rived. Secretly Alice was g ad.
,, Then her aunt sent her a check
i Instead when she heard of the acc’.
dent.
The* came a near accident with
her car. Not a real one hut near
enough to cause Bob, her brother,
to advise her that being in love
waa no excuse for falling to watch
the traffic lights.*
The climax came when John to'.d
her one evening that the. paper he
waa working for was to cease pub
lication.
"It’g that opal, John!” exclaimed
Alice. "Things have gone wrong
ever since I gave it to you."
"Nothing stayed wrong, dear.” re
plied John, "but If I thought the
opal was up to any tricks I’d get
rid of It much as 1 like It. It’s so
full of flashes of light and beauty
—;uet like you.”
"Try It anyhow, John,” begged
Alice. "Maybe I’m Just silly, but
let’s see.”
When John came again the ex
‘‘JITTERBUGS” NOTHING NEW
“Swing” music and the “jitter
bugs” dance are 'hand-me-downs
from ages past rather than pro
duets o? the machine age, say
experts on music and dancing at
the University of Omaha.
“ ‘Jitterbugging’ is nothing more
than a reincarnation of old folk
dance forms,” Miss Ruth Diamond
head of the women’s department
of physical education, said today.
“The open dance position used
by ‘jitterbugs’ is the old fashioned
polka reborn. A very fast taming
variation of this in which the dan
qulslte stone of Are and light wae '
no longer In evidence. Instead he
wore a somber dark pin in his tie.
Alice looked at It sorrowfully.
‘Til have to buy you some bright
ties te cheer things up a bit," she
sighed. “Now let's see what hap
pens." \
Alloa's girl friends gave her a
euowar soon after, then a lineal!
shower. Her rich aunt sent her
eome old family silver. Her father
gave her an extra check, "Just for
luck" he said. Even Bob took hex
out oa the golf links explaining*
"John** such s crackerjsc* golfer
you ought at least to know *
mrjhJ# (rom a caddy.”
Then JoTin came In one evening
with two theatre tickets, a bunch
of vlolete and a smiling face. a
‘‘Honey, I’ve got a Job—a better
one than I bad. I told you mg
«wae ceasing publication.
thfl'l because It and another
one hare been merged. I'm to be
In on the combination with a better
salary. Bo corae along. We’re go
ing out to celebrate.”
Alice w as half laughing and halt
crying ea she pinned on the violets.
“Now, John, will you believe la
opals bringing bad luck? As soon
as you got rid of that pin our luck
changad. That dark pin was ugly
hut It did the trick. Why aren't
you wearing it?”
“I shell If you say so,” answered
John, “Tt I can etop laughing long
enough to get It out of my pocket.
Here It la ” l
"Out. J hn. thle Is the opal pin.
I don't understand.”
“I’ll explain, sweetheart Ton
know I don’t believe In opals bring
ing bad luck. So 1 had Ned Lodqr*
an artist fellow I know, daub soma
dark oolor over this one eo It
couldn’t be recognized. I've really,
been warn Ing It Just the same only
under a cloud as you might say.'
Things h*ve been coming our way
lately aad today when I found out
about si new Job I took the pin
back to Ned and bad him clean tt
up. 8o here Is my opal, lovelv as.
ever, wt.L all the bad luck or good
luck Intvt May I wear It now.
AH«er
"TTf cj. rse, you silly darling,
laughed t 'Ice. “No, I'm the silly
one. Whj. now I Just loy# that
bemtlHl t pal."
•• Wa'lt have to tell Mr. Stowe, tM
jeweler all about It," said Jobs*
“It wotjt ts long bsfors ws’11 hard
te ecnet R him as*l*—about a ret*
dW»« ttww"
:ers sometimes dance apart and
then come together again, is a
bouncing polka which was done by
the modem jitterbug’s grand
parents.”
Asserting that the "jitterbug”
is a problem for psychologists to
explain Mr. Martin Bush, head of
the University of Omaha depart
ment of music, declared that
“swing” music, like “jitterbug”
dancing, is centuries old.
Mr. Bush scouted the notion that
“swing” is a serious vival to what
he calls “good” music.
“Swingers of tunes are not taken
any more seriously by musicians
than the average adult gets excited
over the small boy who rings
the door-bell and runs.”
-0O0
EDGAR BROWN FIGHTS ON
FOR NEGRO ARMY FLIERS
Wsshingiton, D. C. July 19 (C)
—Although the fight to earmark
$10,000,000 of the $300,000,000
National Defense Fund for the
training of Negro officers in the
Army Air Corps \#as lost, Edgar
G. Brown, leader of the fight ia
Congress, urged Negro citizens
to continue the fight in newspa
pers, petitions, and letters of pro
test. Mr. Brown called the defeat
of the proposal, “taxation with
out representation.”