The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, April 06, 1935, Page EIGHT, Image 8

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    BUILD Your Own COMMUNITY By Patronizing Your Naborhood Stores |
BEER Draught or Bottled
RABE’S BUFFET
Refreshments and Lunch
2425 N. 24 St 24th & Lake St.
Ja. 9195
Old Time Lager on Tap
Buy Your Garden and
Grass Seeds Now!
Save Money by Using our
BULK GARDEN SEEDS
Home Landscape Service.
924 N. 24h St. JA-5115
Duffy Pharmacy
We. 0609
24th and LAKE STREETS
DRUGS
PRESCRIPTIONS
HARDINGS
ICE CREAM
Free Delivery
■ ..■ ■■■■■■■■■ ■ -
Autry Ice and Coal Co
Basket Coal, Lump
35c, 3 for $1.00
Nut, 30c, 3 for 90c
Prompt Delivery
We. 2762
TIRE & BATTERY SERVICE
AUTO PAINTING
General Repairing
At. 9662
THE IDEAL GARAGE
2419 Lake S'reet
FEBRUARY SALE
Beautiful Evening Gowns and
Afternoon Dresess of all kinds
This Spring’s Styles
The KRAFT BARGAIN Store
2518 N. 24th 1701 N. 24th
AFTER THE WRECK
-CALL
KAISER & CHRISTENSEN
AUTO TOP AND BODY CO.
Auto Painting
AT 8972 2810-12 N. 24th St.
SLAUGHTER BAR-B-Q HUT
and
RESTAURANT
2002 North 24h Street
Under New Management
EDNA MITCHELL & Son, LEON.
DEEP ROCK
SERVICE
STATION
24th and Charles
Try Our
KANT-NOCK AIVIATION
GASOLINES
Kohrell and Carpenter.
Expert Auto Repair
and Battery Service
Quick Service Ja. 8103
M. & W. GARAGE
1706 N. 24th Street
IT’S HERE NOW.
FIRE-CHIEF
Emergency Anto Service
BULGER TEXACO STATION
30th and Wirt. JA-8052.
MILTON WILSON ATT.
FOR
JOB PRINTING
CALL
WE. 1570
OMAHA GUIDE
Sponsored and Supported by Public Spirted Northside Business Men for the Purpose of Creating Better Understanding
Between Merchants and Consumers an dfor the Purpose of Bringing Dircetly to You the Latest Price Quotations
MYERS1
FUNERAL
HOME
Dignified, Efficient Supervision
Nothing Over-Or Undone
2416 N. 22 St. WE 0248
X—- — |
TUCHMAN BROS.
The North-Side Largest “Food Market.”
Lowest Prices on Quality Foods
24th and LAKE 24th and LAKE
GRAPE-FRUIT SEEDLESS 3 for lOcj
ORANGES C15SHS A each Icj
YAM SWEET POTATOES lb. 5c
BREAD fresh'^daxly 1-oaves 5c
BLACK WALNUTS 5 POUNDS 10c!
SALMON 11®
MASON & KNOX CAFE
2307 N, 24 St. Prompt Delivery WE 4208
FREE! FREE! FREE! For A Few Days Onty
Free, with your stein of beer the following
sandwiches: Hamburger, Imported Swiss or
Cream Cheese, Boneless Cold Ham, Tender
Prime Roast Beef.
Let us Club you with a club breakfast in a Mason and Knox way
-FOR BREAKFAST
HAM AND EGGS, German fried potatoes, Three hot Tea—
No, Man-sized biscuits with coffee_u.20c
BACON AND EGGS, American fried potatoes,
hot tea biscuits, coffee..• •__ 20c
HOME MADE SAUSAGE, Knox fried potatoes,
hot tea biscuits, coffee_ • 20c
AUNT DELILAH HOT CAKES with Sausage or
Bacon, coffee 20c
Storz Triumph Beer On Draught
HOME OF THE BARBEQUE KING
Is---✓
_ _ \
HERMAN'S.
Market
* }
WE-5444 24th & LAKE Sts.
. -n «sa*% -
The Best Quality Foods At The
Very Lowest Prices
WE DELIVER
V-----------*
Economic Highlights
(Continued from Page 7)
American mid-west, turned mil
lions of acres of rich wheat land
to deser., and had the laugh on
.he puny efforts of mere man to
control production.
As if that lesson weren’t severe
enough, Nature is again menacing
crops—dust clouds recently swept
day after day across the vast
mid-west wheat country. The
area affected includes over fifty
million acres of wheat land. The
result, unless late rains do the
unexpected and remedy the situa
tion, will be an inconsequential
crop.
The See re ary of Agriculture
has removed certain restrictions
on the planting of spring wheat.
This is expected to cause a rise
from 1 to 30 million bushels in the
normal spring crop.
POLICE MAIM DEFENSELESS
WORKER IN BREADLINE
New York, N. Y.—CNA—As
he attempted to get a meal at a
relief kitchen located at 142nd
Street and Fifth Avenue, Tommy
Aiken, unemployed worker, was
savagely assaulted by a relief
official and policemen last week.
Aikens right eye was knocked out
and he was o.herwise permanent
ly maimed.
The worker was standing in
the bread line when the police
men ordered him to “get out of
line” and “get inside the kitch
en.” Aiken who had been waiting
for his turn for several hours,
protested that he would lose his
| place in line and refused to move.
The policeman, knocked him out
of the line into the kitchen.
Beaten To Floor.
Aiken then threw* his hands
above his face for protection,
whereupon the policeman hit him
on the head with a night stick
and knocked out his eye. The
relief station head, Capt. Radclif
fe, whi.e, held Aiken while the
policeman kicked him in the
stomach and beat him to the
floor. Even after he was on the
floor face down he was beaten
on ihe head by a policeman.
The policeman dragged him in
I
iO the lobby where he lay un
conscious a half hour before an
ambulance picked him up.
T,l»e policemen were numbers j
6671 and 4406. The former is;
known for his brutality against
Negroes. Capt. Radeliff who
comes from Kentucky has a repu
tation for beating up the Negroes
in the breadline.
Framed on Assault Charge
In addition to the beating giv
en Aiken, the policemen have
framed him on a charge of crimin
al assault. The worker is now in
the Harlem Hospi: al.
Aiken lives at 411 Convent Ave.
in Harlem. His sister Miss Hor
tence Aiken, has turned his de
fense over to the In.ernational
Labor Defense, which will be
supported by the Unemployment
Councils and the League of Strug
gle for Negro Rights.
The relief knhen at 142nd St.
and Fifth Avenue formerly gave
3 meals a day but since the City
Administration cut relief only
one meal is served. Workers
claim that the food is unfit for
human consumption.
MERIDIAN, MISS., FORMS
BRANCH OF N. A. A. C. P.
New York, Mar. 29.—Citizens of
Merldan, Miss., have completed the
organization of a branch ef the N. A.
A. C. P. there, it was announced at
the national office of the association
here today- The number of persons
required for a branch is fifty, but
Meridian was able to furnish 126
charter members. This branch is the
first active unit of the NAACP in the
state of Mississippi in many years.
There are skeleton organizations in
Panola county and Jackson. Meridian
citizens were spurred to act by the
case arising in Kemper county where
Ed Brown, Henry Shields and Yank
Ellington were brutally beaten and
“forced to confess” to the murder of a
white farmer. The case is now being
appealed by the N. A- A. C. P.
Officers of the new branch are Rev.
Roy L- Young, president; Rev. B- W.
Coates, vice president; Mrs. Louise
Lawrence Webb, second vice presi
dent; C. T. Butler, Sr., secretary.
Miss Dorothy Harris, assistant sec
retary; and Miss E. B. Ivy, treas- j
urer.
I
sa ‘ na £ um
k MORE JOBS
I The easiest way to prevent unemploy
ment is to create jobs. This Community
offers a great variety of employment op
portunities. When you patronize your
community merchants wholeheartedly,
you increase their volume and make it
possible for them to give all the mem
bers of this neighborhood additional em
I ployment.
ARE YOU DOING
YOUR PART
«
PETERSEN’S BAKERY
2506 N. 24th Street 24th and Lake Streets
Our Bread Holds Its Freshness. .Besides that our bread tastes better,
toasts better, and comes sliced or unsliced. We have twelve varieties
of dark and light bread.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
Cinnamon Bread, delicious
toasted, loaf_15c
Whole WTieat Parker house
Rolls, doz. .,,..15c
Jellyrolls, filled with Strawberry
Jelly, each _-15c
Meringue Shells, pastel
shades, each.. 5c
Black Walnut bars, doz--15c
Black Walnut pud cakes, doz.25c
Vermont Cake, each.. 35c
Yellow Cake, pineapple
icing, each__—.44c
Pecan Fudge Cake, each -44c
Tuttie Fruttie Cake, each-45c
Plain Butter Rolls, doz.--20c
Hot Cross Buns, doz-22c
Fruit and Fig Coffee Cakes,
each _—..15c and 20c
Lemon Snaps, doz. - 8c
I PIES—Apple, Peach, Blueberry, Gooseberry, Lemon and
! Butterscotch, each ..,
- I
/------ \ '
Grant Street Pharmacy
PHONE WEbster 6100 .,
Registered Pharmacist Prompt Delivery
PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED
MIDAS ICE CREAM
Flavor—Quality Always
P. J. Robinson, Mgr.
24th and Grant Streets Omaha, Nebr.
^•’■ViV.V.ViViViW.'.V.'iW.V.V.V.W.V.Vi’.V.ViViVA
STATE REGULATORY AUTHORITY AT
STAKE
By E. Hofer.
The proposed Public Utility Act of 1935, on
which Senate committee hearings are now bein"
held, is supposedly designed to eliminate hold com
panies.
The public has heard much from the politicians
of real or fancied abuses of various holding com
panies.
What has not been emphasized is the potential
effect of the bill on operating companies—on any
utility company, large or small, which is in any
way connected with a holding company, or one
v hich engages in interstate commerce, or one hav
ing any physical connection whatsoever with ano.h
er company engaging in interstate commerce.
Ever since the utility industry began, it has
been regarded as a local business. For that reason,
regulation was left to the jurisdictions of each
tate, and was never vesed in a commission which
could act for the country as a whole. The public’s
needs are obviously very different in South Caro
lina, for example, than in New York. The cost of
producing and distributing power varies widely
from s.ate to state. A utility program which is
necessary and adequae for one state, might not fit
the needs of a neighboring commonwealth.
Under stale commission regulation, utility serv
ice has been made extremely responsive to the needs
of each individual state. There has never been a
derth of power—always a surplus. Service has con
stantly improved, and rates have steadily declined.
It can be statistically proven that the American
people, operaing costs and taxes considered, receive
the best and cheapest utility service in the world.
If the proposed Act is passed, operating utility
companies generating 99 per cent of the nation’s
power will come under the jurisdiction of a federal
commission. Management will be a figurehead—
and the state commission will have little cause for
continued existence. If they make a decision that
might conflict with the blanket policy laid down
at Washington, that decision will be automatically
negated. So strict and sweeping are the provisions
of the bill that a utility could not engage legal or
engineering counsel, expand facilities or buy sup
plies, without permission of the Washington com
mission.
In brief then, the bill proposes to nationalize
management of operating companies—under a po
litical bureau. It would do that at the expense of
the present owners of the properies, who would no
longer have a voice in ministering their own affairs
—and at the expense of each state, which would no
longer be able to regulate utilities in the best inter
est of its own citizens and consumers.
The bill seeks public support under the guise of
correcting abuses. Those abuses, if they exit, should
be corrected—but should that end be achieved by
giving a politically apponited commission absolute
dictatorship over one of our most essential and
progressive industries; an industry in which mil
lions of citizens have invested billions of dollars,
and which is already subject to stringent regula
tion by each state?
V.W.WAVW.V.W.V.V.V.V.V.V.VAW.WiW.ViWiV
STUDENTS CONSTRUCT
APPARATUS TO SAVE
UNIVERSITY EXPENSE
Students at the Municipal Univer
sity of Omaha, working under the
direction of Dr. W. D. Maclay, assist
ant professor of physics and chemis
try at the school, have constructed
laboratory apparatus for use in their
classes at an estimated saving of
more than a thousand dollars to the
university and Omaha taxpayers.
According to Dr. Maclay “for all
practical purposes the equipment is
a3 serviceable and efficient as the
most costly on the market.”
“There’s absolutely nothing crude
or amateurish about the apparatus”
Dr. Maclay said. “It is of an excel
lent calibre. In addition to the sav
ing effected the university by the
undertaking, the students also re
ceived valuable training in practical
construction of apparatus” he said.
As an illustration of the saving ef
fected, one piece of apparatus, an
ampere frame, costs something over
$35, according to Dr. Maclay. The
one built by the students cost exact
ly 35 cents.
Included in the collection of new
apparatus are a device for testing
the efficiency of a motor, for study
ing the function of a vacuum tube,
a coulometer, apparatus for verifica
tion of Kirchosff’s laws and the am
pere frame.
School authorities say the work of
the students will save taxpayers
“more than a thousand dollars.”
POEM
Those wHo are quick to criticise,
Condemning what you try to do,
4nd never giving aid to you
Are the ones you can surmise,
Have made a failure of their lives,
While those who share complete suc
cess,
Will give a hand of helpfulness,
To worthy efforts that are made
To help another make the Grade.
Myrtle M. Goodlow,
Omaha, Nebr.
MAID-WELL GARMENT CO.
CLOSES DOORS.
Forrest City, Ark. Aril 4.—
The Maid-Well Garment company
of this <iity,' against which at
torneys acting tor the National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People have filed suit
on account of back pay due col
ored and white women employ
ees under the NliA code, has
closed its doors for an indefinite
period. The company announced
that it was forced to shut down
when the NRA Regional Labor
Board forbade its use of the Blue
Eagle. The Blue Eagle was taken
away from the plant after com
plaints had been filed in Dallas,
Texas by John P. Davis, who
made a personal investigation at
Forrest City for the N. A. A. C.
P. and the employees.
NOT DOING SO WELL IN HEALTH |
Mr. George Hibler, 2125 Ohio St., is'
reported not doing so well. A few
days ago, he had a severe fainting
spell in a Barber Shop. Mr. Hibler is
one of Omaha’s leading citizens, he
has lived in our city thirty-five years
and has been very active in civic,
church and political affairs. He has
held a trusted position at the News
paper Union for 23 years. Omaha is
hoping for hi3 full recovery.
WHY NOT NOW
We believe you will, you said you
would,
Why Not Now, pay when its due.
Come in, mail or call the office
And Yre will send some one to you.
WHY NOT NQW, Pay your subscrip
tion,
Whqpn it’s due.
B. S. Sufton,
Circulating Manager
Do You Want Naturally Wavy Hair?
Try Our
CROQUINGNOLE MARCEL WAVE
Affords Numerous Changes of
Coiffure.
CHRISTINE ALTHOUSE
BEAUTY SALON
242a N. 22nd St. WE 0846