The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, September 29, 1934, Page Seven, Image 7

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MARCH of EVENTS MVWVWUVWUWUVATJWJ
—---- CITY and NATIONAL
Omaha, Nebraska, Saturday, September 29, 1934 Seven
I
Published every y at 2418 - 2* Grant Street The Oraalva Guide Pub
lishing Oompiny, Inc.
Entered as Second <1n*« Matter Mbroti 15, 1927 at the Post Office at Omaha,
Nebraska u.tder the Act ot Congress of March 3, 1879.
Term of subcriptlon . <5 00 per yea*
_ ^'"‘AV.’.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V .V.VV.V.'.V/.V.V.'.'a'*
DRIVING THE PAN-HANDLER OUTOF
THE TEMPLE
As Jesus scourged the temple oi the money changers so lovers of
justice and believers, in race recognition- must purge the race
of “Pan-Handling Politicians,” leeches and parasites, sapping the
strength of an aspiring people. Those vultures likewise prey upon
the candidates, giving nothing by way of political strength, only
promise of a big v*»te that can not be effected.
Viewing around us the great progress having been made in
all lines of human endeavor, it is odd, t,hat methods and trend of
thought of office seekers as regard the “Negro Vote,” seems to be
at an utter stand still. Time has nofr brought about the change of
viewpoint that it should. The intellect of the Negro voter has be
come constantly improved. With that improvement of the race,
and a determination to forge ahead. Yet the pan-handler collect
from the candidates on the program racket, house rally racket,
church rally racket or sells tho solid “Negro Vote” at a price, like
selling Brooklyn Bridge—plenty suckers have bought it, without
the candidate ever awakeiiihg himself to progress around him.
When will political office seek ere get abreast of the times,
realizing that “Negro Thought” has greatly changed from the old
order, rebelling against outworn 19th Century methods of obtain
ing “The Negro Vote” and offer to the Negroo voter the racere
cognition that he is battling for,his pro-rata of appointments and
employment in government, recognizing in the pan-handler a blight
and scourge, driving him out in the manner deserved.
The sign of the times is on the Negro political pan-handlers,
on the ancient, outward method of obtaning or influencing the
“Negro Vote” as well as being on the candidates traversing these
paths outworn by past generations. This sign of the times calls
forth every effort available to drive the pan-handler and all his allies
from the Temple of Justice, fair play, race advancement, recognition
and respect
COOPERATIVES UNDERLIE AGRICULTUiUL
STABILITY
C. O. MOSER, WCE PRESIDENT OF THE
AMERICAN COTTON COOPERATIVE ASSOCIA
TION. RECENTLY OBSERVED THAT COTTON PRO
DUCERS, LIKE OTHERGOUP3 OF FARMERS. HAVE
THREE PROB| EMS TO CONTEND WITH: FIRST,
PRODUCTION; SECOND, THE EXCHANGE OF
THEIR PRCRUCT FOR THU PRODUCTS AND SER
VICES OF OTHER PRODUCING GROUPS: THIRD,
NATIONAL AND INTERN YUONAL OCCURRENC
ES AND ISSUES WHICH AFFECT FINANCE, EM
PLOYMENT, BUYING POW ER, AND SO ON
THIS GIVES A PRETTY GOOD IDEA OF
WHAT THE FAMER WrHO TRYS TO GO IT ON HIS
OWN, FACES. EVEN THE F*RST AND AMPLEST
OF HIS PROBLEMS, PRODUCTION, CANNOT BE IN
TELLIGENTLY HANDLED — HE CAN’T KNOW
HOW MANY OF HIS ACRES SHOULD BE FRUIT
FUL IN ORDER TO PRODUCE THE HIGHEST POS
SIBLE RETURN. WHEN IT COMES TO EX
CHANGE HE IS ALMOST POWERLESS — HE SIMP
LY TAKES WrHAT SOME BUYER OFFERS, AND
THAT IS USUALLY A VERY UNFAVORABLE
PRICE. AND W HEN HE, UN TURN, BUYS THE NE
CESSITIES AND LUXURIES OF LIFE, HE MUST
BUY IN ORGANIZED MARKETS, WHERE OTHER
PRODUCERS HAVE COOPERATED IN ONE WAY
OR ANOTHER TO CREATE PROFITABLE PRICES.
IN THE CASE OF NATIONAL AND INTERNATION
AL ECONOMIC TRENDS, HE IS COMPLETELY AT
SEA.
IT IS A TESTIMONIAL TO THE VISION OF
PROGRESSIVE FARMERS THAT, RECOGNIZING
THE DIFFICULTIES FACED BY THE INDIVIDUAL,
THEY HAVE CREATED COOPERATIVES TO FIGHT
AND SOJLVE THEIR PROBLEMS FOR THEM THE
COOPERATIVE HAS SIZE, IT HAS POWER, AND IT
CAN EMPLOY EXPERTS IN MANY FIELDS. IT
IS A FORCE IN THE FORMING AND PASSING OF
LEGISLATION, AND IS CONSIDERED AND CON
SULTED IN PURSUING THE NATIONAL AGRICUL
TURAL POLICY. IT IS, IN BRIEF, THE FARMER’S
GREATEST VEHICLE ON THE ROAD TOWARD RE
COVERY AND PROSPERITY.
-a_
_ DO YOUR PART NOW
PRODUCTION, CONTINUED PRODUCTION,
IS NECESSARY IF OUR MANUFACTURING
PLANTS ARE TO KEEP MEN EMPLOYED. BUY
POWER MUST BE BUILT. BUYING POWER
MUST BE USED. ONLY THROUGH CONSUMP
™N WmCH DEMANDS INCREASED PRODUCTS
BE BUILT UP NO PLANT CAN
CONTINUE TO OPERATE BEYOND CONSUMER
DEMAND.
A DOLLAR SPENT NOW FOR BUILDING
DOES TWO THINGS. IT HELPS THE CONSTRUC
TION INDUSTRY PUT BACK TO WORK THOU
SANDS OF SKILLED AND UNSKILLED WORKERS:
IT BUYS NEEDED MATERIALS NOW CHEAPER
THAN IT WAS A FEW MONTHS AGO: THIS MERE
LY PROVES THAT COSTS ARE INCREASING. TO
SAVE MONEY AND CREATE JOBS, ACT NOW.
STATISTICS SHOW A SHORTAGE OF OvER
1,000,°00 HOUSES. tf;u FIGURE IS based on a
DEFINITE SURVEY IN 257 CITIES. MILLIONS OF
HOMES ALREADY BUILT ARE SORELY IN NEED
OF MODERNIZING—A CONCRETE DRIVEWAY, A
PASEMENT, A PAINT JOB, A NEW ROOF, REFUR
NISHING , *
A DOLLAR WILL BUY MORE FOR YOU TO
DAY, DO MORE FOR YOUR COUNTRY, THAN LAT
ER_*
—Baacamr 'Wiaairav'-j.1"i- i >. r... jwjsjmmmiu,-,i—rwriv
Auction Block Reveals
Wanton Waste
i-- . ■■ --- ...
By R. A. Adams
(For the Literary Service Bureau)
In Kansas C?ty Star of Sept. 2,
was a nows item with the heading,
Richness on the Block.” It told
of the sale of the furnishings of
the five story seventy room man
sion owned by the late R. A. Long,
millionaire lumberman of Kansas
City, Mo.
Among the things mentioned as
scheduled for the block were
‘‘the $3600 a dozen service plates,
the $900 a dozen inlaid sherbet
cups; the standardized equipment
of Long’s private barber shop,
a pipe organ at the landing of)
the grand stairway, and a heavy j
Austrian hand-tufted carpet that
will require twelve strong men to
lift.”
This mansion exclusive of its
furnishings cost $575,226.07. It
was called a five story limestone
treasure chest. The furnishings
were rated at $207,783.57. One
clock alone cost $3500, another
clock cost. $1000.
R. A. gLong professed to be a j
Christian, he made large donations'
and was counted a philanthropist, i
He built, a town and named it
Longview, to perpetuate his mem
ory. But he reveled and wallow
ed in all of this extravagance
while millions were hungry.
In the light of such conscience
less waste while millions are hun
gry, it should not seem strange j
that the masses are dissasisfied;
that communinism is gaining ad-j
herents; that labor should demand!
a larger share of what it pro-.
duces; and that Christianity!
should suffer from the conduct of
such an inconsistent professor of1
its tenets.
- I
SOCIAL SINS
Seduction)
By Dr. A. G. Bearer
(For the Literary Service Bureau)
Text: So that the hatred with
which he hated her was greater
than the love wherewith he had
loved her.--II Samuel 13:15.
This text is a part of the record
of the sin of Amnon, son of David,
against Tamon, his own half sis
ter. And it is typical of all such
cases.
1. Seduction is Born of Lust.
Lust, and not love, features in se
duction. Love will not destroy.
Love may desire sex association,
hut will seek it in the right way.
Rather than work injury to the
one loved it yrill use restraint and
afford protection.
2. Affects Others than the Im
mediate Actors. The deplorable
results of seduction reach more
than the man and the woman con
cerned. The relatives, especially
the parents must share humilia
tion, the sorrow and shame that
may come. Then there is the prob
lem ef illegitimacy to be con
sidered. If the woman seducted
becomes a prostitute them all the
evil that may ensue will be check
ed up to the vile seducer.
*?' Swift or Slow, Punishment
ill Gome. Sometimes punish
ment is swift as the death of
Anrnon at the hands of Absalom;
that of Shechem at the hands of
the brothers of Diana, daughter
of Jacob whom Shechem forced.
Sometimes the wronged woman
takes the oase in her own hands
and kills, as Clara Smith did Jake
Hammond. But punishment is in
evitable for this terrible situ
YOUR GREATEST
PROTECTOR
The nation has just observed
“CoMtitatio* Week.” It was
sponsored by the American Le
gion, which carries on continuous
work in the interest of better
Americanism.
In these trying times, it will
benefit every citizen if he looks
backward into the handful of pa
triots, who had suffered great
privations or long years of war to
break the bonds of governmental
oppression, marched home. Short
ly afterwards they established
the United States of America—
and for the first time in world
history liberty and equality be'
came the fundamental principles,
of a great nation.
There is danger that, in our
effjort to obtain temporary bene
fits and favors, in order to meet a
periodic depression (“casual em
barassment” in the life of a na
tion, as Thomas JefJferson de
scribed it) we as a people will
lose part of the great heritage!
that was handed down to us by
our forefathers. Today the Con
stitution is under attack—critics j
would have us believe that it has
outlived its usefulness, and is only
a scrap of paper. If the Consti
tution is outmoded, so is liberty,
so is the right, to the pursuit of
happiness, so is the right to own
ership of property, and the priv
ilege and duty of working and
saving for one's self. The Con
titution deal with the basic prin
ciples of liberty, equality and
freedom from oppression which
are as timeless as the seas.
Every American citizen hould
resolve to do all in his power to!
maintain constitutional liberty —j
liberty which was won with blood
at Yorktown.
Proverbs and Parables
(“When the Shoes is on the
Other Foot”)
%
By A. B. Mann
(For the Literary Service Bureau)
The following illustrates this
saying :
He was a philanderer. To his
wife, he boasted of his “affairs”
with other women. He did not
contest the divorce suit, and his
wife won a decree. He was mar
ried again.
This new wife, a poetess, he"
came interested in a curly headed
poet. They were, seen together
very often. This husband had
evidence of improper relations be
tween his wife and the poet. He i
warned them both. Then he mur
dered the poet who was accused
of alienating his wife’s affection.
So, as in thousands of cases, it
is not a matter of principle, hut
of whose foot is being pinched. A;
common but tense reminder is
“What’s sance for the goose
should be sauce for the gander.”
LOOKING BACK
(“Saying Grace” )
By Videtta Ish
(For the Literary Service Bureau)
The newspapers published an
account of an old farmer who
went ta a restaurant with his son
and his city-bred daughter-in
law. When the old man. began to
“say graee” his Bon kicked his
foot and the girl snickered. Hut
the old man “said graee right
on.”
The farmer was taught this and
had so trained his children, but
they beearae ashamed and failed
to follow his teaching. So, it was
the custom among folks of" my ;
childhood days. Even non*Chris" ;
tians woud offer thanks for food. '
And children would have been as
tonished to see the family eating ,
without “asking the blessing.”
Now, conditions have changed.
Even in many so-called Christian
hnnies they drop down and begin
sating with Ho thought of God—
ind thank*. But such neglect will I
not inspire respect for religion
among the “younger generation.”
ARE YOUR
CHILDREN SAFE?
T. Alfred Fleming, Supervisor
of the Conservation Department
of the National Board of Fire
Underwriters, tells of a confer
nece he had with the president
of the Board of Education of a
large city on the subject of fire
hazards in schools. The president
emphatically stated that all the
schools under his jurisdiction at
tained the maximum m fire safety,
and to porve his point, invited
Mr. Fleming to accompany him qij.
;; tour, of inspection. He s^legfc"
cd a sdlwol"having J,0Cj.stjidcpig,
which had been in service. qp,yf
two years, and was supposedly.,a
model structure of its kind,
The inspection dielosed in"
numerable fire hazards, and re
sulted in an expert survey of all
schools in the city. This complet
ed. a bond issub to the tune of
-1,800,000 had to be issued to
eliminate the unnecessary dangers
in supposedly “perfect” schools.
As Mr. Fleming says, “The
trouble is so few people know
just what are hazards in public
building construction and what is
necessary in proper maintenance
of these buildings so as to avoid
the danger of catastrophe.” Thou
sands o5 existing schools which
are believed safe by officials in
charge, are the worst kind of fire
traps. Only a person experienced
in fire prevention can point to
hazards and show how they may
be eliminated.
Every American school, whether
it houses five pupils or five thou
sand. should have proper inspec
tions to safeguard the nations’
invaluable young lives — thou'
sands of which have been need
lessly destroyed by fires in the
past.
The National Board of Fire
Underwriters is more than anx
ious to give expert ad\jice t» any
community as to how to remove
fire hazards from schools.
THE RAILROADS MAINTAIN
_SERVICE
No industry has suffered greater
economic difficulties in recent years
than the railroads. For them, the de
pression did not begin in 1929—it start
ed just after thea war, and not a
single year since have they been able
to earn the legal “fair return” upon
their investment of 5 3 4 per cent
permitted by law.
Nevertheless, the efficiency of the
Tines has been scrupulously main
tained and improved- Not so many
years ago car shortages were a com
monplace—today there are no short
ages. Trian speeds, both freight and
passenger, have been increased,
spoilage of perishable goods in tran
sit has been reduced to a minimum,
and standards of safety have reach
ed the point where you are safer on
a train than in your own home.
The railroads have out expenses to
the bone. But it seems impossible for
them to effect further economies of
importance—and ft is inevitable that
service will suffer unless measures
are taken to give the rails fair chance
to earn a reasonable profit, even if
rate increases are necessary. Hun
dreds of thousands of jobs, millions
of invested capital, and the very exis*!
tense of the nation’s principle means
of transport, are at stake
- i
SOMETHING NEW FOR NEBR.
Nebraska has long since became
famous for its New Captiol Building
the raising of more livestock, grain
and poultry than any other state but
it remained for some Omaha men and
one outstate man to bring into this
state a new venture in the line of
poultry endeavor and the farming in-,
i us try that may bring the state new
fame. i
A company foamed and incorporat
ed, for the purpose of raising Ducks I
Geese and poultry, specializing in Pe- j
kin Ducklings far fancy trade and
hotel service. A feature specialty
“The Art of Cooking Duck ”
A very fine tract of 640 acres ef
land has been selected, the uroposed,
plans Jor the engineering, architect-,
iral and landscaping hafve been com
pleted. the company will start about
October 15 with thirty-four people!
ind expects to increase steadily until'
MO are employed. Many ol workers!'
rill be needed, assuring a livelihood
'or at least 200 families.
The company goes under the name
>f the Pleasant Valley Duck Farm and
lave a temfporary office in the Mer
chants Njjtioaal Bank building at
I3ih and Farnam. Sts. jj
*SX MV 'tX W
Read What Others Say |
My Dear Editor:
1 have read your editorials
aimed at, what you term, “The!
an-Handling olitieian. ”
We all know these things
exist. They cost us nothing. If
these candidates are “dumb
enough to listen and fall for
these rackets, they are the losers, j
Why worry* A candidate that;
dumb does not deserve to be ini
office:.
1, am firm believer in race ad
vancement, and rcoguition you
will find my vote in the column
of any candidate, who has'some
thing constructive td-bffer, rather
I than a handshake, hypocraey or
! meaningless compliments.
Sincerely vours,
' • ■ E. A..
-.
Mr. Editor1
Your editorials “Delivering the
I Vote” and “The Most Abomin
able Racket,” appearing in the
issues of Sept. 15 and 22. certain
ly struck at the most vicious prac
tice.
Everyone within the race knows •
that these evils do exist, and thatj
self apopinted political leaders do
practice these carious scemes,
fleecing candidates and bringing
the race into disrepute. It has
always been a mystery to me how
these “an-Handlers” can so con
sistently deceive the supposedly
smart candidates for office.
1 for one, join in the Legion
of Negro Voters, wo are looking
for a constructiv prgram of race
recognition from candidates. Such
a program alone will merit my;
vote. Keep up the good work.
Very truly yours,!
L. II. C.t
The Whole Truth About Why
Kiss Inez’s Battles Nclw Has
a Position in Washington, D. C.
Where She is Making Good.
By 0. J. Eurckhardt, Chairman of
the Civic Committee
—
Shortly aft or Dr. Wm. J. Thom';
kins was appointed Recorder of;
Deeds in Washington, D. C. Mr.
; Marry Leland, the chairman of the
Democratic Negro Club of Nebras'
ka, and also State Oil Inspector,
made a visit to Washington
and spent some time with his
friend, Dr. Thompkins, during
which time Dr. Thompkins sug
gested to Mr. Leland, because of
his interest, he would make a
place for a Nebraska girl, when
he got his prograkn arranged.
Hence at the opportune time he
wrote Mr. Leland and said, “At
last I ferreted out my first mile
post. I am now in a position to
give to Nebraska a clerical posi
tion starting on a wage scale of
$1440.00 per annum. Please write
me as soon as possible when you
and Senator Burke have agreed
upon the party. As I believe you!
are in a position as to advise him,
as to the proper colored girl, who
will best serve this purpose. I
quote in the above paragraph:1
°4 suiTjdoioqj, mq uioj^
Leland, but Mr. Leland being an
appointee under Governor Charles
W. Bryan, who was opposing Con'j
grcssman Burke in the August pri- ;
maries for the nomination for Ud
S. Senator. Didn’t think that it !
.was good politics to ask a favor j'
from Congressman Burke uder
these circumstances, for he want',!
ed to be free to work in the in-'\
terest of his Boss in the primaries. !<
After which he would be free to ■ <
support which ever one of the two,1
would be nominated.
Hence Mr. Leland knew that 1
was chairman of the Civic Com- 1
nittee and was acquainted as j
well as himself, with the quali
fication and preparedness of our i
girls. Therefore he turned the *
matter over to me to selert the *
girl, and finish up the case. So 4
after some prayer and mditation,
I selcted Miss Nnex Battle* and !
informed Mr. Leland of the same,!
and gave him my reason for so T
doing, and he readily agreed with e
me in the selection. t
I asked Mr. Leland if he had,*
any objection to me consulting E
Johnny Owens, Dexnbocratic state a
Representative, and Dr. G. B. „
Lennox whom, we both knew to t
be affiliated with the Democratic t
party, and especially Mr. Owen*, *
--V
who is outstanding as a Ne*gre>
Democrat and Legislator. Mr.
Leland said he would be glad 1®
have me counsel with them, if L
felt so disposed, as the ease was
i nrny hands. Now after 1. iss
Inez wa heartily indorsed by Mr.
Arthur Mullen, national com
mitteetman, Francis Mathew, State
chairman and Congressman Bur'
ke and the loading Negro Demo
crats.
Mr. Leland then became inter
ested in the matter to the exent
that he rendered her every assist
ance in getting her ready for the
ork and trip to ashington. Hence
Miss Matties now is enjoying the
pleasure of having a good posi
tion under the supervision of Da
Tompkins who is recorder of deeds
irst. because Mr. Leland made it
possible through Dr. Tompkins for
a Nebraska girl to be appointed.
But for M iss Battles being the one
appointed I am solely responsible.
Truly yours. O. J. Burckhardt .
Chrs. of the Civic Committee
Omaha, Nebraska
Statement Not True
Publicity Chairman of Negro Nocr
Partisan Voters and Civic
League Repudiates Statement
Which Appeared in Bee-News
on Raiding of Policy Game
About 30 Days Ago.
“As Chairman of the Publicity
Committee of the Negro Non-Par
tisan Voters and Civic Jjeague,
and charter member of the same,
1 want the citizens of Omaha to
distinctly understand that there
was no truth in fact, in the state
ment which apjears in the above
issue referred to, that the defen
dants in the raid was or is affiliat
ed with this league and was hold
ing a secret session on matters
pertaining thereto. While some of
them may be menunbers arid
officers of the league, we wish it
to be understood that if the name
of this league was used, it was
done ' so wholly without the
knowledge of the league and as a
body woh have banded them
selves together to strive, struggle
and work for the interest and bet
terment—civic, industrial and po
litical—of our group, e wish to
condemn such unwarranted acts
as is bemgcsandd-shownRHRDL
as shown above as being destruc
tive to the aims and purposes ©f
the league, and unresserredily re
pudiate the person or persons who
by the above report of the press,
was guilty of using the name of
this league as a shield and protec
tion to further their own personal
interests.
II. L. Harris—Chairman #f Pub
licity Committee.
THINGS ONE REMEMBERS
By R. M. Hofer
I was taking to a very earnest lady
feently who was enthused about the
^ 'distributing the wealth
i the »mted St*tes-” I don't think
she really knew the meaning of the
ohrase, but it seemed to have a nice
ound t® her.
She said the capitalistic system
should he changed aad limit the
imount of money any one person
»uld have to not over one million dol
ars.
•I agreed no one would starve on
i million and asked what her plan
vas fer stopping industrial leaders
chen they had made their million. In
►ther words, when would such men
ease te be laborers from which point
hey started, and become capitalists?
If Henry Ford had been shelved
rhen he made his ifrst million, the
''•rid might have waited years to
njoy the millions of cheap aufcomo
-ues he has built.
Ford is merely an example of the
idvidual genius of a laboring man,
dnch can be seen on every hand in
« ^ Stat€s- ^ was this genius
nat built our nation.
You cannot limit genius and at the
am® time give its beneficial results
» the people.
-Those who thoughtlessly talk about
^hstnbution of wealth, confiscating
apital through taxation and Kmita
?* °* inventive genius, are simply
dyocatmg, whether they knew it or
ot, destruction of millions of jobs
*d wiping out of savings.
My intellectual lady friend was up
tre^. as it were, when she started
> try to decide, “Wken ie a laJ^
nmn not a laboring man?" or
when does he become a capftalstr’