The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, June 10, 1933, Page 2, Image 2

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    Observ
ations
ot the
Week”
b> JOHN BE?:j. HORTON, JR.
WBIX FOLKS:
GOIV T * TOWN, GREAT STAGE
SHOW!
B.ll Robinson and his altogether
new S-j.pe i;h< w opened its week’s en
gage nt-n: ti the Orpheum Theatre,
Saturda . June 4. with a gala cast of
fifty accomplished artists of undis.
p-'ed reticle. Before I go much far
ther 1 t ire admonish my readers that
if ther > a finer, more high-class
"-rllv dean group of perform
Bill Robinson Scores Bigger
than ever in His Brand New
Show.
sr* on the different theatrical cir
cuit* A America than COIN’ TO
TOWN, why I’ve ever seen their su
periors ar.d am wondering whether or
not I’ve tr. r scrutinized their equals.
• • •
This show offers ten different
-scene* depicting many diversified
phase of human play purely realistic
of Negro Life from its lowest to its
highest level. There were dancing de
mons. scorching torch singers, kings
of comedy who kept the audience in
a state of mirth and laughter throu/jh
•out the show, and bewitching high
brown girls who seemed as so many
Venu*es visiting this earth from an
other planet.***
• • •
The principals in this show aside
from the one and only “Bo” were
Miss Ada Brown the leading lady
who haila from Kansas City, Mo., and
Mr. Harry Swanagan, her accompan
iat, at the piano who sang “I can’t
Get Mississippi Off MyMind”, “Don’t
Talk About Me When I’m Gone",
“I’ll Be Glad When You’re Dead You
Rascal You”, and “Stormy Weather”
Le and Swan Lee whose comedy re
partee in an orgy with a “cop” in a
jail scene where the whole theatre
was kept laughing so much; Jimmy
iJasquette, The Russell Woodin Choir,
and the Famous “Brown Buddies
| Chorus of Twenty’ beautiful girls.
[Joys, they were just—‘too good!’
* * *
After the first scene, “Working on
•he Levee”, came many more among
’he first being a song and dance
i number featuring the introduction of
Bill Robinson who sang “I’m Happy
is the Days Is Long”, In this scene
* ha chorus were groomed in Marlene
Dietrich attire. Bill’s funny jokes of
i hilosophical import and his timely
wisecracks coupled with his superb
tap-dancing was the attraction extra
ordinary. “B”, as his best friends call
Irm. never forgets to bring his spec
ally built dancing steps to town
when he comes and executed in the
'uilest measure his art of tap-danc
ing upon these steps.
* * *
Then comes the grand finale when
ill actors play the final scene toget
her and behold, the end.
“This
and
That....
by CLIFFORD C. MITCHELL
• * *
(CHANGE OF ADDRESS!
* * *
Every reader, editor, book publish
er, circulation manager, and corres
pondent, please be informed that each
letter, paper, magazine, book or what
not, sent to me after June 5th should
be addressed as follows:
Clifford C. Mitchell
Writer
3507 South Parkway,
Chicago, Illinois.
* * *
When I arrive in Chicago some
time during the afternoon or evening
of June 8th I hope to have a message
from all of you awaiting me there
and addressed as above.
* * *
So many papers and writers com
mented on my coming release during
the month that lack of space prevents
individual mention of same. I am
greatly indebted, however, to Russel
J. Cowans for his features in the
Chicago Defender, and in the Balti
more Afro-American. Also, to Davis
Lee for his comment in his “Chat
IRE-OPENING
WEEK
Starting Sat. June 17
PLAN TO ATTEND THIS MAMMOTH RE-OPENING WEEK’S
STAGE AND SCREEN SHOW.
OMAHA, We Have Renovized. Just Feel Our
Comfy Cool Air. Hear Our New Screen Sound (A
New $35,000 RCA Sound System).
%**\e*w. KING of «Hi_DE_Hr
and creator of “Minnie The Moodier” and
“Smoky Joe"—the world’s ONE and ONLY
SCAT SINGER in a RED HOT jazzy Sta*e
show of RED HOT Rhythm.
199
OXCXEiTRA E
IHKRSOM I
M Nicodemus (King of
eccentric dancers)
Leitha Hill (Bluest of
blues singers)—
H K1 ma Turner (demon
girl tap dancer)
m
Qndo*tki£cheuc%
ROBERT ?
MONTGOMERY, in<.
- b* ~ 6 r “Made on
% Broadway”'
eve& ,>* „
,v
1 _
with Writers” column in the SNS pa
pers. And particularly grateful for
the comments in the San Antonio
Register; Negro World, and the New
York News; Dayton-Forum; Omaha
Guide; Newport News Star; Savan
nah Tribune, and the Indianapolis
Recorder. When the “exchanges” ar
rive Monday night I presume I shall
see myself indebted to many other
papers for favorable comments.
* * *
Because but very of my colored
readers have access to the columns of
the Charlotte Republican-Tribune, the
leading white weekly in Michigan, I
want to quote a couple of paragraphs
in Mr. Murl H. DeFoe’s front page
editorial in his issue of May 25th.
“*** Republican-Tribune readers
may recall Clifford C. Mitchell (col
ored) whom I mentioned as receiving
a visit recently from Secretary of
State, Frank D. Fitzgerald. Mitchell,,
with abundant innate ability, is, ac
cording to Warden Harry H. Jack
son, the most influential man in pris
on. Mr. Fitzgerald’s interest in Mitch
ell resulted in a nation-wide effort
for Mitchell which we are pleased to
record has been successful. Mitchell
is to be released June 8 with per
mission to go directly to Chicago
where an influential colored man,
(Hary H. Pace, president of the Su
preme Liberty Life Insurance Comp
any according to a letter received by
Governor Comstock, will take Mitch
ell under his supervision. Mitchell has
a keen mind and is fundamentally!
clean and good but forgery during
drunken sprees has been his downfall.
Regardless of the other help that he
has undoubtedly had Mitchell can
primarily credit his new chance to
Frank Fitzgerald.
“***Through the courtesy of Mr.
Mitchell the writer has been receiv
ing regularly a copy of the Detroit
Tribune published by Detroit colored
people in the interest of the large
colored colony in that city. This is one
of the string of many colored papers
throughout the country carry Mitch
ell’s weekly news comments.***”
* * *
Miscellaneous acknowledgements:
The May Writer’s Digest: June Crisis
and Interracial Review. ***Congrat
ulations from; Frank D. Fitzgerald;
Cas.well W. Crews; Harry H. Pace;
Rev. R. W. McLain; Mrs. Irene Ed
ward; Mrs. Daisy M. Buchanan; Mrs.
Henry G. Spaulding; Mrs. J. E. Siz
er; Mrs. Myrtle Betts; W. E. Brook
ins: Myrtle King Brown; C. Chester
Michael; Author’s League of Amer
ica; Shogi Effendi; John P. Douglass;
Mrs. Hallie M. Salter; Washington
Tribune; Upton Sinclair; W. M. Hull;
John S. Meldon; Mrs. Katherine Kent
Lambert; C. H. Hutcherson; Henry
George Washington: Harry Barnett;
and from scores of my fellow-inmates.
* * *
TRAIN UP A CHILD
by R. A. ADAMS
(for the Literary Service Bureau)
’Tis axiom, but ne’ertheless is so:
“Training up a child the way that he
should go,”
And it is true, as often has been told,
“He’ll not depart from it when he is
old.”
Reason? ’Tis fundamental truth,
The heart, the mind, the soul, in days
of youth,
Are pliable, receptive, easily
Molded and fashioned as a life should
be.
In youth, if well be the foundation
laid
If on young, plastic nature shall be
made
Impressions noble, good, and true—
the trace
No time nor circumstances can erase.
So, we may be assured, the time shall
bring
Temptations manifold, to youth will
cling
The good instilled, and may dismiss
our fears
Regarding destiny in coming years.
HEROES UNSUNG
>4The Farmers’ Wimmin Folks”
by A. B. MANN
(For the Literary Service Bureau)
While their urban sisters sleep
these women often referred to by
farmers as “our wimmin folkes,” are i
Here's Exhibit A”
ON THE
Value of Telephone Service
Shimmed m
mm
r-J*rr.rrj^ b| Telephone Call
>"•r,^r< fel Saves Man from
1V'1 >■'*1TJT* @ Monoxide Death
i\* gf
Hears Groans, WI IffufirTr^’
PHONE GIRL AVER! Summons Police ■ ^ £ unltu flYT"
COlfNTti"^ W TVBF ' . A ,W*ta'rt telephone Wj T Tl T#* Lg^
1 "r ■lor henr;nK * Wm an » ■/ III / JH
Si 3^Bi«d Husb?Tvcr^^n^eo<r'£*
^nd w'th Alarm f'°°* . I
Stories clipped from newspapers
—about actual telephone experiences—
these statements of fact show tangible
evidence of the telephone’s great value.
The telephone lessens risks, prepares
you for emergencies... saves time, trips
and money.
TELEPHONE SERVICE COSTS ONLY
A FEW CENTS A DAY!
_NORTHWESTERN BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY
up and at work, like Solomon’s “vir
tuous woman,” “while it is yet dark.”
They rise in advance of the sun, make
■fires, feed cattle, milk cows, cook
breakfast and get the “men folkes”
ready for work. Often they “do the
dishes” and do other housework and
are ready to go to the field with the
men folkes.”
Many of these “wimmvn folkes”
never have a vacation. They have not
conveniences such as gas for cooking,
electric lights, and appliances; and
they have not the means of recreation
available to their sister of the cities;
but they “carry on,” and indeed are a
large part of this the basic industry
of the world.
Much praise is given to the farmer
especially during politically campaigns
and very little is ever said of the far
mers’ “wimmin folkes” wives, daugh
ters. and others. But much credit is
due these faithful helpers for all that
may be accomplished by their “men
folkes” Yes they are unsung, but they
are of the hero class, nevertheless.
Old friends are dearest, and new
ones are impossible to win.
DRINK;—
IDEAL Beverages
POP
C.TNC.ER ALE \
LIME RICKEY
“Be Sure—Drink IDEAL”
IDEAL Bottling Co.
1808 N. 20th St. WE. 3043 j
',',11—.1111—1 ~ ~ • ~~T!
Don’t be misled by
old time brands
"marked down to
5c.” JOHN RUSKIN
always was and always
will be America’s
Greatest Cigar Value
at 5c. It is the only
real 10c. quality cigar
selling at 5c.
JOHN RUSKIN has
more than 60 % choice
Havana filler, giving
it a taste and aroma
all its own.
Buy a few today and
learn for yourself
what real smoking
enjoyment is.
V ■ %7 SAVE THE
V'naf. bands
Factual s<zlv redeemable
■Emxzmia
L Lewis Cigar MIg. Co.Mlsrs, N«rark. N. J.
..Read the.....
_ GUIDE
Typewriting, Criticism, Correction,
Revision. Sermons, Addresses and
Special Articles Supplied.
WE HAVE A PLAN TO PUBLISH
BOOKS BY NEGRO AUTHORS
516 Minnesota Avenue
Kansas City, Kansas
CHRISMAN CLARK GRADUATES
FROM LONG SCHOOL
Chrisman Corinth Clark, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Herbert R. Clark, graduated
from Long School Tuesday, June 6th.
Chrisman was presented with a rib
bon which consisted of his class col
ors, for perfect attendance.
. He also received a Letter “L” from
his school which was presented to him
for having achieved three athletic
stunts during the year.
He won a medal for having won
first place for his school in the field
and track meet which was held Mon
day, June 5th at Technical High
School.
Grandmother finds her reminis
cenes are more listened to than her
advice.
It is always safe to learn, even
from our enemies. |
Shirts Finished
8c
When Finished out of Wet
Wash—Thrifty—R. D.
Linen Bdles.
EVANS
LAUNDRY
Phone - JA. 0243
Tires and Tubes
BATTERIES and
SPARKPLUGS
;
Redick Tower Oarage
15th and Harney
If one has three disagreeable tasks
to perform, he might divide them a
mong three days.
I Office Phon»: WE. 0213 /
Res. Phone: WE. 4409
Bay Lawrence Williams jj
ATTORNEY AT LAW jl
Room 200 24th & Lake Sta. !
5 Tuchman Bldg. Omaha, Neb. «
-CLASSIFIED ANp
Wig Making, Curls, and etc. AT-7356
We Specialize in Kitchenette Apart,
ments. That’s why we can give you
the best prices.
WEbster 2113 L. W. Walker
3 Room Apt, Furnished, WEb. 3707.
Ross
Drug
Store
Now Located
At
2122 N. 24th St.
We. 2770
ARE YOU CRITICAL ABOUT
YOUR LAUNDRY WORK?
of Course You Are.
Try Our Semi Flat at 6c per Pound •
with Shirts Finished at 8c each
Edholm & Sherman
—LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING—
2401 North 24th St. WEbster 6055
RHEUMATISM? BACKACHE? NEURALGIA?
Do yoa know what yon are taking for these complaints!
^_ YOU OWE IT TO YOURSELF TO TRY _M
ClOVA'TABS
A doctor's prescription, scientifically prepared and fonnded on a
physician’s hospital research and experience in private practice.
If vonr dmpedst eannot supply von SEND FOR A BOY TODAY
—DO NOT DELAY—CTOVA-fTABS. P.O. Box 1*. College 8ta«.
New York City
Mail this coupon with SO cents (Rend no stamp* 1
• •••••••a ....
CLOVATAB8. P. O. Bo* It. Colls** Station. H«w TaA CM* Bwt I
Nan* ......
Address ................................ UTJ). B*«
Post Offle* . BUt* ..•» _
~. .. ■ini— i i m...
FOR-— Well Planned Quality...
JOB PRINTING
Hi-Grade JUSt Call....
Stationery
Lowest . . WE-175 . ■
Prices
2418-20 Grant St, Omaha