The Omaha guide. (Omaha, Neb.) 1927-19??, May 27, 1933, Page 2, Image 2

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    with Lennox
(Continued from Page 1}
unemployed of our group.
The employment situation of today
has not only affected one, but all, and
we are sure you realize the Colored •
citizens are the first to be fired and
the las- to be considered tor hiring
during this economic depression.
To those concerns who have, and
are g.ving us consideration during
these times as the Pullman Co., and
who do not hold the entire group re
sponsible for what one perhaps may
do. a» the good, bad and indifferent
are found in all regardless of race,
we are indeed grateful. As president
of this crs-an ration I am extending
to your company our appreciation for
the coo’* ration and support you are
giving
Thank rig you very much, and aP
preciat.ng any help or future consid
eration you may give in the form of
employment to members of our group,
I am.
Very truly yours.
Dr. G. B. Lennox. Pres.,
Working Men’s Commissioners :
2122 North 24th St.
THE PULLMAN COMPANY
Omaha, Feb. 23. 1933.
Dr. G. B. Lennox,
2122 North 24th St.,
Omaha, Ntbr.
Dear Sir:
I w sh to acknowledge your letter ;
of January 31*t. which reached me
Feb. lOtfc in connection with the
work of your organization among the j
unemployed of our city. 1 wish you i
every success in this good work.
It is gratifying to note that pro.
feasionai men of our city are taking j
auvh an interest in relieving unem
ployment during these depressing
times.
In the Pullman organization colored
employes in the different departments
enjoy the same seniority rights as
white employes. When reductions are
accessary, such reductions are made
on the basis of seniority. In oor clean
ing force in Omaha. 25^ of our em.
ployees are colored.
I will be glad to hear from you
from time to time on the good work
your organization is doing.
Yours truly,
A. COLLAN,
~~ Acting District Supt.
THE SURRENDER OF WOMAN.
HOOD
by R. A. ADAMS
(For the Literary Service Bureau)
The saddest feature of the rapid
moral decadence of this age, and its
strongest contributing factor, is the
abject surrender of womanhood to the
elements and agencies which are seek
ing the destruction of our civilization.
Made better than man. endowed with
finer sensibilities, blessed with gifts
and graces not possessed by man,—
woman was destined to be the saviour
of men, both m the aggregate and the
individual sense. But, in making sur
render woman has almost destroyed
her influence for good.
In fashions, woman has surrendered
her modesty, the shield for virtue;
smoking and drinking, she has pros,
tituted her finer qualities and done to
herself permanent injury; in sex lax.
ness she has offered her womanhood
on the altar of foolish pride and car
nal pleasure. And in rejecting mother
hood and home maker, thousands of
women have surrendered woman’s
choicest gift, pushing from them their
greatest opportunity to change the
whole current of human behavior and
save the human race from self-des
truction.
It is sad to note that of this sur
render woman is not ashamed. Rath
er she boasts and calls it her emanci
pation—her new freedom. She exults
ir. Bohemian conduct and bacchanal
ian orgies. But womanhood is decad
ent. Continued, it will soon sink to a
new depth of ethical degeneracy, and
will drag down into the mire, the en
tire human race.
-CLASSIFIED ADS
2S.1S Hamilton.—12 Rooms. Modern.
Uooee Newly Decorated, $25.00. WE.
2234. i
BETTY BIfl Chose
£29mat '*=» !
THiG VYILD ’
IDEA IM OO0.
LITTLE SETTYs
head
A BlGr CHAM6C
lt> COMING—
| WTO H E-CL i
LIFE. — Bur
VOlI'lL have
UNTIL NEXT I
WEEL FOP
PULL DETAIL^
OP CAN'T
vou WAIT
CONTINUED— i
TO OPEN IN LONDON
_ I
DUKE ELLINGTON
A final exchange of cables between
Irving Mills and Jack Hylton, the
British banumaster, who represents
Mills abroad, has just confirmed Duke
Ellington’s opening at the Palladium
Theatre in London for two weeks be
ginning June 12th, with the Empire i
Theatre in Liverpool and the Empire
Theatre in Glasgow to follow. The
band which is also booked for night
club, broadcasting and concert en
gagements in England, will close at
the Cotton Club in Harlem on May
31st and sail for London on the Oly-1
mpic June 2nd, accompanied by Mr.
Mills, who will negotiate Continental
appearances for Ellington and his fa
mous orchestra while they are abroad.
During Ellington’s final week in
New York, beginning May 26th, his
orchestra, will be headlined at the
Capitol Theatre with Ethel Waters,
singing “Stormy Weather”, and the
entire Cotton Club revue.
GOVERNMENT LAW EXAMINER
HONORED ON 70th BIRTHDAY
Washington (CNS) The seventieth
birthday of LaFayete McKeene Her.
shaw. a Law Examiner of the Gener
al Land Office, Department of the
Interior, was celebrated by a large
group of the employees of the Depart
ment. May 10, 1933. Under the re
tirement law, Mr. Hershaw’s conn.
MOTHERS—Here IS News
About RAISING STRONG, RUGGED CHILDREN j
Our “VITAMIN D” MILK contains the natu - :
ai “\ itamin D”, extracted directly from cod liver
oil. Each quart contains the “Vitamin D” equival
ent of THREE teaspoonfuls of standard cod liver
oii without the oil itself.
Cooking, boiling, or making into junkets will
not affect the qualities of natural “Vitamin D”.
Think what this means to your child! A quart of
pure fresh milk—and the “Vitamin D” of cod liver
oil—TOGETHER!
From the day that Baby takes his first bottle, |
he needs “Vitamin D” to help nature make his little \
legs and back sturdy and straight, his little teeth j
sound, his bones strong—and this early proper de- j
velopment carries on through life! t
Order this “VITAMIN I)” MILK today!
Call HA. 2226 !
ROBERTS DAIRY CO.
.I
Youngsters enjoy World’s Fair
thrills—Shirley Keil, Robert Bovik,
Eleanor Dufrin, Billy Pearson, Barton
Snow and Billy Snow yell for another
ride on the Flying turns, which was
dedicated last week at A Century of
Progress. The ride was the first to
open on the Midway.
eetion with the Federal Government
as an officer will come to end May
31 ‘ I
When Mr. Hershaw reached his
desk on the morning of May 10th, he
found it decorated with a large bou-!
quet of beautiful flowers. At 10:30
that day employees of the General,
Land Office, headed by Judge John
McPhaul, Chief, of Law Examiners1
of the General Land Office, .filed into
the room where Mr. Hershaw has his 1
desk. Judge McPhaul made a speech
in which he recounted Mr. Hershaw’s
forty-three years service in the office.!
He stated that Mr. Hershaw had been
an able and faithful servant of the
Government; that he exhibited legal
attainments of a high order; that he
has examined records and written
decisions in cases involving questions
relating to public land grants; that
he has written regulations interpret
ing to officers of the Land Depart
ment and to the general public the
application of the laws of Congress;
that he has written reports on bills
introduced in Congress in relation to
the disposition of public lands, and
has shown skill in drafting bills for
submission to Congress relating to
the disposition of the public lands of
the United States.
At tbe conclusion of his remarks
he presented to Mr. Hershaw, in be
half of officers of the General Land
Office, a walrus hide brief case with
Shirts Finished
8c
When Finished out of Wet
Wash—Thrifty—R. D.
Linen Bdles.
EVANS
LAUNDRY
Phone - JA. 0243
the initials “L. M. H,” thereon; a very
expensive fountain pen with Mr. Her
shaw’s name engraved thereon,,and a
apropriate birthday card containing
the signatures of 137 officers and
clerks of the General Land. Office and
the Interior Department.
Mr. Hershaw is a graduate of the
Atlanta University, class of 1886 and
the Howard University Law School,
clas 1892. He was admitted to the bar
of the District of Columbia the year
of his graduation from the law school
Mr. Hershaw is one of the twenty
nine men who organized the Niagara
Movement in 1905. He was a member
of the conference, the outcome of
which the organization of the Nat
ional Association for the Advance
ment of Colored People. He has from
_
t
Ross
Drug
Store
Now' Located
At
2122 N. 24th St.
We. 2770
the begmnig and is now a member
and supporter of the NAACP. He
was for two years president of the
Bethel Literary and Historical As
sociation, and has all of his life been
active in Sunday School and Church
work. In 1888 he married Charlotte
E. Monroe at Atlanta, Georgia, with
whom he lived happily until her death
in 1930. He is the father of three
daughters, all of whom are living;
Mrs. James T. W. Granady of New
Don’t be misled by
old time brands
"marked down to
5c.” JOHN RUSKIN
always was and always
will be America’s
Greatest Cigar Value
at 5c. It is the only
real 10c. quality cigar
selling at 5c.
JOHN RUSKIN has
more than 60% choice
Havana filler, giving
it a taste and aroma
all its own.
Buy a few today and
learn for yourself
what real smoking
enjoyment is.
SAVE THE
BANCS
THEY ARE
REDEEMABLE V
-•« ♦
L Lewis Cigar Mfg. Co.Mhn, Newark, H. J.
•
York City, Miss Alyss Mae Hershaw
of Washington, and Miss Fay Mc
Keene Hershaw, a teacher in the pub
lic schools of Baltimore, Maryland.
REV. HENRY HUGH PROCTOR OF
BROOKLYN DIES OF BLOOD
POISONING
Brooklyn, N. Y. (CNS) The Rev.
Dr. Henry Hulgh Proctor, pastor of
the.Nazarene Congregational Church
Brooklyn, since 1920, a leader in the
movement for NegTO equity and au
thor of religious essays, died Thurs
day, May 11, at St. John's Hospital
of blood poisoning which developed
from an injury to his right hand, suf
fered as he was leaving a taxicab on
May 3.
Dr. Proctor at first did not consid
er the injury serious, but Monday
night he was removed from his home
to the hospital and was operated on
Tuesday.
Dr. Proctor was born on December
8. 1868, in Fayetteville, Teim., and in
1891 he was graduated from Fisk
University, Nashville, through which
he worked his way by picking cotton.
His parents had been slaves on a Fay
etteville plantation.
The following year he entered Yale
Divinity School, at New Haven, and
in 1894 was ordained into the Con
gregational ministry.
His first charge lasted twenty-five
years. It was in the First Congre
gational Church in Atlanta,
i Dr. Proctor wa\ active as an ob.
; DRINK\=
IDEAL Beverages
POP
GINGER ALE I
LIME RICKEY j
"Be Sure—Drink IDEAL”
IDEAL Bottling Co.
1808 N. 20th St. WE. 3043 j
servor of the needs of the Negro, es
pecially of those members of his race
in the South, with whose condition he
was familiar in his capacity as perm
anent secretary of the National Con
vention of Congregational Workers
Among Negroes, held annually in At
lanta. He was a prolific writer on the
subject. In the fall of 1931 he wrote
a series of six articles for the New
York Herald Tribune in which he ex
pressed the hope' that inter-racial ac
cord in North Carolina, Georgia, and
Tennessee prophesied the eventful e
mancipation of the Negro.
During the World War, at the re
quest of General Pershing, Dr. Proc
tor went to France with the YMCA.
War Council to visit Negro troops.
In recent years he had been mod
erator of the New York City Congre
gational Church Association, in whioh
31,000 Negroes are represented. He
wrote “Sermons in Melody” publish
ed in 1916 and ‘Between Black and
White,” in 1925.
Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Adel
ine Davis Proctor, whom he married
in 1893, two sons,,, Roy and Henry
Hugh, Jr., and three daughters Murial
M. and Vashti Proctor, school teach
ers in Brooklyn ,and a married daugh
ter in Chicago.
Tires and Tubes
BATTERIES and
SPARK PLUGS
—See—
Redick Tower Garage
15th and Harney
ARE YOU CRITICAL ABOUT
YOUR LAUNDRY WORK?
of Course You Are.
Try Our Semi Flat at 6c per Pound
with Shirts Finished at 8c each
Edholm & Sherman
—LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING
2401 North 24th St. WEbster 6055
RHEUMATISM ? BACKACHE ? NEURALGIA ? I
Do 700 know what yon are taking for these complaint*|r
YOU OWE IT TO YOURSELF TO TRY _£
ClOVA'TABS
A doctor's prescription, scientifically prepared and founded on a
physician’s hosnital research and exnerience in private practice.
Jf vonr dmo-wist cannot annolv won SENT) FOR A BOY TODAY
—DO NOT DELAY—CtOV AtTARS p.0. Bo* 18. College Stat
New York City
Mail this con non with SO cents (Send no stamp*)
• »••••••••••• e e e a •••*••*••*•• e •••••••••••• • eSPe •••#••••••*** •
CLOVA-XAB8. P O. Bo* II. CoIWks 8tt«on. Hn» Tor* Ot*r Dspt. *
Name ....
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