The independent. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1902-1907, December 25, 1902, Page 4, Image 4

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    4
THE NEBRASKA INDEPENDENT.
DECEMBER 25, 1902.
CGhGfiESSiCNAL fitCESS
Both Htus- AiJtiii nl to January 5, 1003
W ttftlnugiou Ouimp lielri:ii
" iu luuu
Washington, D. C, Dec. 22, 11102.
(fepetaai Correspondence.) Uoth tne
houses of coubicsd au.o trned Satur
day for the iioiidajs ad will not
meet again until January 5. In the
short recess the usual h. rry and bus
tie uoes not ptriain, hence the long
recess.
In the discussion of the legislative
appropriation bill, Yedn sday, when
tue Items for the maintenance of the
department of justice were reached,
the democrats sprang a surprise when
Mr. Bartlett of Georgia proposed an
amendment appropriating $2ou,0u0 to
enforce the anti-trust laws now on the
statute books. For a moment the re
publicans were all at pea, but after a
hurried consultation of the leaders,
decided not to ma..e a point of order
against the amendment ' Mr. Bartlett.
a democrat, explain d his reasons for
offering the amendment. He said the
republicans had been p aying with the
trust question, and h??d done nothing,
and if they were sin ere it was time
for action.
Hepburn of Iowa proposed as a sub
stitute his bill api r priating $500,000
for the same purpo e, :ft after Mr.
Cannon h:d agreed to allow the
amendment to br placed on this bill,
the same was done, amid democratic
applause.
It is to be hoped that Attorney Gen
eral Knox will now proceed to enforce
the criminal clause of the Sherman
law. as full power and the munitions
of war are now in his possession.
The last report of the bureau of
statistics shows the United States to
be the greatest coal producing country
in the world; the United Kingdom, sec
ond; Germany, third. We produce 31
per cent; the United Kingdom. 28 prr
cent; Germany, 19 per cent, of the
whole, which, in 1901, was 8GG.1GK.00O
tons.
The perfection of facilities in the
government printing office in the last
few years has enabled this dprtmut
to get out the work of the census bu
reau in a much quicker and better way
than cvr before. The new printing
onice, the largest in the world, will be
ready for occupancy by the first of the
new year.
Senator Gallinger has introduced in
the senate a proposed amendment to
the constitution giving the resident
o! the District of Columbia the righ
to vote for president and for one mem
ber of congress. Action on the matter
is considered improbable.
A bill was introduced in the senate
yesterday by Mr. Scott, which pur
poses a limitation of the civil service
rules so far as long terms for em
ployes is concerned. It provides that
all persons employed in the elassifie
service shall eerve for a term of six
years and at the close of which they
shall only be eligible for another term
of six years. Railway mail clerks are
exempted and their positions made
permanent. The bill also provides
that the classified service shall in
clude only persons whose salaries
range from $900 to $l.SOo.
The senate adopted a resolution of
fered by Mr. Wet more appropriating
$3,000 for the purchase of a bronze
bust of the late President McKinley.
Mr. Patterson introduced a bill pro
viding that all national banking aspo
rtations and other national corpora
tions, for the purpose of suits, shal'
be deemed citizens of the United
States.
The Spanish treaty between the
United States and Spain was ratified
by the senate in executive session yes
terday afternoon. There was no de
bate or division.
Senator Morgan brought up in the
senate Tuesday an inquiry concerning
the isthmian canal commission. He
said t tat the records disclosed that
each of these commissioners had ben
receiving $1,000 a month each for 2:
months and yet hid not been actuall .
at work over 2 months of the time. TTe
declared that Secretary Hav would nor
furnish him a detailed expense account
of Ihe commission, vrsring as an ev?i,ae
that his cler'-s were too busv to fur
nish same. This fame excuse was
urged by Secretarv Root as a renon
why he should not furnish a sia(e
mer.t of Philippine war expenditures.
Mr. Mortran went on to sav thai the
canal commission had spent several
million dollars, and with no partic
ular result accomplished. Comrois
sirms pre verv n"mpvr'is and verv ex
pensive since McKinley's first inau
guration and it is useless to try and
peeure a report as to expenses. Gov
ernment officials refnep to furnish it
Coneressman Rhallpnberper has re
ceived and accepted an invitation to
address the merchants and manufac
turers' association at Baltimore on
January 29. One or two membc-s of
the president's cabinet and other
prominent men are also among the
-peai ers. This association is the sec
ond largest of its kind in the United
States and covers the eastern and
southeastern states tributary to Mary
land. The banquet given will be the
most elaborate affair of the year. The
speakers will be taken from this city
in a special car.
On Thursday, the house passed a bill
reducing the duty on Philippine prod
ucts coming into the United States
from 75 per cent of the Dingley rate
to 25 per cent thereof. The democrats
urged that 25 per cent was better than
75 per cent, but contended for free
trade. There was also democratic op
position to tho proposition to reduce
the rate on Philippine goods coming
into the United States without making
a corresponding reduction on goods
from the United States sent into the
Philippines.
The events of the past week in
Venezuela have stirred up sentiment
to such an extent that Congressman
Shafroth has submitted a plan to con
gress for arbitration ,n the matter.
This plan is generally approved by
the democrats. Tne feeling is growing
apace that Germany, England, Italy,
Spain and Belgium have exceeded ths
limits of a "peaceful demonstration"
and are encroaching upon the Monroe
doctrine, a national policy which all
frood Americans will agree should be
sacredly preserved.
The war measures already adopted
by these European powers against a
weak and defenseless nation can only
he attributed to the Anglomania that
for five o- six years has paralyzed the
administration.
The fight made by democrats and
pop"lirts in the last campaign has re
sulted in an abatement of the resolve
of republican leaders to enact into law,
at this time, the whole of the Fowler
currency bill. Consultation among the
republican leaders developed the fact
that it was poor politics for them to
force the matter at once, particularly
t)oCinep (he country bankers were op
posed to it, hence it was decided to
emr-t only portions of the Fowler
measure at this time, the remaind'""'
to follow at succeeding sessions of
poTTTPf.?. With this end in view. Mr.
PVT-ripr hoc rnorted out of the com
mit) pp on bnHug and currency a bill
that will authorize national banks to
U'oup peept currency to the extent of
n nor cent of teir capital stocV. The
nvfninoi Fowler bill provided for an
of fi-is form of currency to the
oYtent of 0 ppr onnt of the capitaliza
tion and from tht un to 100 per cent,
with n heoyy eradiated tax.
The new bill will limit the issue
strictly to 20 per cent, but not in ex
cess of the capital, including the se
cured currency, the taxation to be the
same as the secured circulation based
upon 2 per cent bonds. It will provide
for a reserve against deposits, namely,
1") por cent in the country banks and
25 per cent in the case of city banks;
also a 5 per cent guarantee fund to be
held by the government as trustee. .
There will he a further provision to
the effect that redemption shall be
made over the counter of the banks
of ' ue and the clearing house in
the clearing house district to be es
tablished. It is probable that three
such districts will be created in the
lited States.
The government will have nothing
whatever to do with the current re
demption of the notes. The 20 per
cent issue under the terms of the bil'
will not be subject to the provision of
Lie law, which forbids the withdrawal
of mor than VJ,000,000 a month, as
now obtains in the case of the secured
currency.
The reform forces, in their great
campaign of education for six years
past, have hardly accomplished a
pre ;r work than to arouse the people
t- the dangers of the original Fowler
bill.
The statehood and the militia bills,
pending in the senate, have been al
lowed to go over until after the holi
day recess. The lst-named measure
is the pet of ivtr. Dick, of Ohio, who
is nlone responsible for its provisions.
The houce is engigd at present in
'he consideration of the p ire food bill,
a measure that has been rending for
several sessions of congress.
Tl" present promises to be the most
bri'liant societv season in years, and
th" capital hosts a"d hostesses are
vicing with each other in the vulvar
and ostentatious dfciVay of wealth.
Thn fqfp of manv a lw is determined
in the drawing-room and great prob
lems of state are in manv instances,
shoved aside until the devotees of so
ciety pav their devotions to thpir cod.
Spnator Deitrich vs. ConerpRsman
elecr TTinshaw: Seaor Millard vs.
Coneresqman-elnot McCarthy. Two
cases in political jurisprudence that
just now are causing considerable acri-
TALL
IAMS' October, 1902. importation of black PercLeront, Belgians and Coacbart was the largest
ever made west of tha Missouri ftiver. His stallions of big size, quality, finish and extremely
low prices are proposition that wilt make yon his buyer. If yon can pay cash or gire bankable
note, you will sure boy stallions of lams. Only man in the United btates that importod only
black or bay stallion, lie has just imported
63 ST A L LIONS- 63
Shipped to New York by fast boat, then by Fargo Express, special train from Hew York to St
Paul, Nebraska. lams' big bams are full of big, black, ton stallions. He is fast finishing a
new barn 26x100 feet. lam's boreea are tie seitmtUm of the town. Visitors throng his baso. and
ay: "Neter saw so many big black stallions together:" "They are larger, bigger bone, more
finish than ever before;" ''But lams is progressive:" "He buys them larger and better each
year;" "He makes prices that makes the people buy his horses;" "lams his a horse show
every day, better than Mate Fairs." He has on band over
100 BLAlK PERCHfcRONS, BELGIANS and COACHERS 100
2 to 6 years old, weight 1.600 to 2,500 lbs. More blaek Pereherons, ton stallions, largest French
horse show winners, more government approved and stamped stallions of any one importer in tbe
west, lams speaks French and G-rman; payt no interpreter, no buyer, no salesman; no two to
ten men aa partners to share profits. His buyers get middlrmen's profits and safaris, lams
buys direct from breeders. This with his twenty years' experieace secures the best. All the
above facts 8ave his buyers $50u to t ,000 on a first-class stallian and you get a first-class horse, aa
only seeor.d rate stallions are peddled by sleek ien to be sold. Uotjdtmes aeit themselves.
It costs $600 to $800 to bare a salesman form a company and sell a second rate stallion. Form
your own companies. Go direct to lama barns. He will sell you a better stallion for (1,000 and
SI, 00 than others are selling at 2,000 and f 4,001). lams pays borse'a freight and his buyer's fare.
Good guarantees. Varna in tvwiu Don't be a clam. Write for an eye opener and finest horse
catalogue on earth.
AN K 1AM
St. PauL, Howard Co., Neb. On U. P. and B. & M. Rys.
References: fct. Paul State tank, First State Bank, Citizens National Bank.
FR
mony in Nebraska republican circles
and considerable uneasiness among
postmasters and prospective ones. The
senators seem to have rather the bet
ter of it, denying the right of a member-elect
to dictate patronage until
he snail have taken nis seat. These,
facts considered, and the presence of
State Chairman Lindsay, who wants
to be United States attoney, this is
a storm center for Nebraska republi
cans. Lindsay ought to have the job.
His expertness in forging a fac-siniile
of an annual pass that never existed
might be useful in official position.
Your correspond' nt is glad to be
able to announce that Senator Dietrich
is in the city. This information is
given for the b3nefit of those who
do not know that the presence of so
much intellectuality in one place is
responsible for the disturbance of at
mospheric and me1 erologicai condi
tions now so prevalent.
H. W. RISLEY.
Lowering Railroad Charges
Mexico has found a way of lower
ing railroad charges that beats inter
state commerce commissions 10 to 1.
It is said that every fall of 1 cent an
ounce in silver means a saving to the
people of Mexico of $100,000 in rail
road charges, for the railroads have
been built by foreign capital and the
charges are all paid in silver. The
goods that Mexico sends out of the
country over these roads are sold for
gold and every time that silver goes
down, the price of coffee, lead and oth
er Mexican products goes up. It Lakes
only half as much of the products of
labor to pay the interest on the rail
road bonds as it did when the roads
were built. Of course the foreign own
ers of these bonds don't like it a little
bit and they are all for the establish
ment of the gold standard in Mexico
so that the Mexican dollars that they
receive for interest and freight and
passenger charges shall buy three
times as much as they do now. The
consequence would be that the Mexi
cans would have to send out of the
country three pounds of coffee, or
three times as much-of other products
of labor than they do now, to get the
same number of dollars. That would
be good for the foreigner, but mighty
hard on the Mexicans.
The financial depression is moving
slowly westward. It began three years
ago in Russia, where today great
masses of the population are only
saved from starvation by government
benefactions. Then it invaded Ger
many and business failures and de
pression caused great want and suffer
ing. Now it has invaded England and
tens of thousands of men are out of
employment, which the check to Orien
tal trade on account of the fall in the
price of silver is greatly aggravating.
If the people of England and Germany
can't buy our goods and the falling
off in the export trade shows that they
cannot some of the factories in this
country will soon have to curtail their
output, unless something is done to
extend prosperity to the masses of
this country, as well as to the trusts
and railroads, so that these masses can
purchase more goods.
Lincoln Hide Market
H. J. Mason. Fullerton. Neb., sends
money to pay for subscriptions and
remarks that he wishes he could place
about fifty copies. "A good many in
this vicinity that ought to read such a
paper, for they will never be able to
get out of the old rut until they have
that kind of information."
The Lincoln Hide & Fur Company,
920 R street, Lincoln, Nebraska, suc
cessors to S. J. Dobson & Co., quote
the following prices, f. o. b. Lincoln,
until further notice: No. 1 green
salted hides, per lb., 7c, No. 2,
6c; bulls and side branded, Cc;
horse and mule hides, large, each,
$2.35; small, 75c-$1.50; green sheep
pelts, each 40-75c; dry pelts. 5-8c per
lb.; dry flint butchered hides, per lb.,
12-13c; dry fallen, weather beaten and
murrain hides .per lb., 5-10c. Our clas
sified fur list, together with little
booklet telling how to trap, skin,
stretch and handle furs and hides to
bbtain the best i -suits, will be mailed
free to all upon request, also write for
tags and general information any time.
All correspondence promptly attend
ed to.
fy!j..Trr!.. - ...
Ps2Ey There is no whiskey the
I OlLER'SCjt eqUai 0f a pure malt Na
J fyi&Sim wiuskey and 1
jyl ILER'S PURE MALT 1
HJrlfl i absolutely the finest, m
1
in absolutely the finest,
mellowest and most de
lightful whiskey in tho
world.
V How cnHn?s
r:ftilleryOm
S W9 F 'T n ETft
fffi L fief SUP
CURED SECRETLY.
Cox Scat FREC.
Any woman cancurcl.er
hii-baixl, son or hrot ier
of liipior drinking, by
aoerciiy placing t.iis rem
e ly lu his coffee, tea or
food w ithout his luiov. 1-e-lgc,
as it is entirely odor
less and tas ele"8. Any
Rood and faitlif n 1 woman
can wipe out this fean'ul
evil and permanently
Btopthj craving for liq
uor, as did M rs. II. U.
Townsend, of Selma, l a.
l or years she prayed to
her husband to quit
drinkin" but found that
be could not do so of hit
own f iee will, and learn
ing of this remit rkabla
cure, the determined to
try it. Mr. Towns nd
says that before she gava
her hn tiancl halt a box
of Mllo Tablets he lost all desire for whisky i the sight or
odorof whisky and beer now makes him deathly sick. Mrs.
Townsend's word of gratitude is only one of the thousands in
possession of this company. Anyone who will send their
name & address to the Milo Drug Co, l.T jiilo Building,
St. Louis. Mo., will receive b mall, sealed In plain wrapper,
free package of this wonderful remedy aud full instructions
how to cure the drink habit. It ecsts nothing to try U.