The Wageworker. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1904-????, October 09, 1909, Image 8

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ADE IN LINCOLN
LINCOLN MONEY
EFT IN LINCOLN
E BY FRIENDS
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First Trust M Savings Bank
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0000OffiO0000
r ssm r
(J. No better flour sold on the Lincoln market
Every sack warranted. We want the trade of
Union men and women, and we aim to deserve it.
If your grocer does not handle Liberty Flour, 'phone
us and we will attend to it. Ask your neighbor
how she likes Liberty Flour. We rely on the
recommendation of those who use it.
H. 0. BARBER & SON
TOXOC00000COffiO0000OffieOffiO000OQ
GREEIN G ABIDES
i
The Dr. Benj. F. Bally Sanatorium
g Lincoln, ieDrasKa
1
2 For non-contagious chronic diseases. Largest,
$ best equipped, most beautifully furnished.
To
UNION MEN!
t mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmimmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm,
HELP US TO HELP YOU
SUIT TO YOUR ORDER
No
Less
JtW$ 15.00
FIT GUARANTEED AT THE
The Laboringman's Friend
133 South .Thirteenth Street, Lincoln, Nebraska.
J.H. M. MULLEN, CUTTER AND MGR.
NEBRASKA'S SELECT HARD-WHEAT FLOUR
Wilbur and DcWitt Mills
THE CELEARATED
LITTLE HATCHET FLOUft
RYE FLOUD A SPECIALTY
Telephone vs
Doll Yhone aoo, cAuto l4Sg
145 SOUTH 9TH, LINCOLN, NEB.
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Your Cigars Should Bear This Label.. ,
3
union-mad Osara. ,1
It is insurance against sweat shop and
tenement goods, and against disease.
Indianapolis, Ind. Frank Dully,
general secretary of the United Broth
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners, is
sending to the delegates of the United
Brotherhood to the American Federa
tion of Labor and the building trades
department of the A. F. of L. the calls
for the next conventions of the two
bodies. Mr. Duffy is a delegate to
both. The convention of the Ameri
can Federation of Labor will be held
in Toronto, Canada, beginning No
vember 8, and will continue until the
business before the convention is fin
ished. The convention of the building
trades department of the American
Federation of Labor will be held in
Tampa, Fla., beginning October 11.
Representation in the convention of
the A. F. of L. will be on the follow
ing basis: From national or interna
tional unions, for less than 4,000 mem
bers, 1 delegate; 4,000 or more, 2
delegates; 8,000 or more, 3 delegates;
16,000 or more, 4 delegates; 32,000 or
more. 5 delegates: 64.000 or more, 6
delegates: 128,000 or more, 7 dele
gates, and so on, and from central
bodies and state federations, and from
local trades unions not having a na
tional or international union, and
from federal labor unions, one dele
gate. The basis of representation in
the convention of the building trades
department is along the same lines
as for the American Federation or
Labor. ,
Detroit, Mich. Union seamen
throughout the great lakes region are
rejoicing over the announcement from
headquarters of the International Sea
men's Union of America that the or
ganized seamen of the Atlantic and
Pacific coasts will give financial sup
port to the sailors, firemen and cooks
on strike against the Lake Carriers'
association. "An unceasing fight un
til an honorable peace is secured" is
the slogan that has been sounded
among the striking marine workers
for months and the aid promised by
the employes on ocean vessels has
given renewed hope to the men who
are fighting the employers' associa
tion. All unions of sailors, firemen
and cooks on the eastern and western
coasts, it is declared, have decided
to back the lake unions to a "winning
finish." The strike has been in force
since May 1 last, the total number in
volved being 10,000 men.
Indianapolis, Ind. A complete reg
istry system of the membership of the
International Typographical union is
to be established at international
headquarters in this city. The new
system, which will be of the card in
flex type, will show the name of each
member, the union of which he is
member, whether he has been expelled
or suspended, and is so if he has been
reinstated, and various other details
To each member will be assigned an
individual number. As an example of
the manner in which these individual
numbers will be utilized in case
traveling card is issued to a member
it will bear the number of that mem
ber shown in the records at interna
tional headquarters, instead of bearing
the consecutive number of the card
at present. - v
Boston. The strike of Boston plas
terers' union, which began July 29, has
been settled. The men struck for
wage Increase of five cents an hour,
which would make the new union rate
65 cents an hour. All the employers
but the members of the master plas
terers' association agreed and their
men remained at work. In fact there
were few, if any, men out of work at
any time during the strike. Under
the terms of the agreement a wage
rate of 62V4 cents an hour goes into
effect at once and the 65 cents an
hour rate will be paid on and after
March 1 next. An agreement was also
signed.
Washington. Secretary Frank Mor
rison of the American Federation of
Labor, received word that by an al
most unanimous vote the United
Brotherhood of Carmen, comprising
employes of many of the big railroads,
at its convention held at Atlanta, Ga.
decided to affiliate hereafter with the
American Federation of Labor. At
present there is in the federation
the Car Workers' International union
and it is said to be probable that
steps will be taken to amalgamate the
two associations.
Boston. Large gains in membership
and finances of the Lathers' union
were shown by the reports of the of
ficers at the second session of its in
ternational convention in this city.
President William J. McSorley of
Cleveland recommended in his report
that biennial instead of annual meet
ings be held.
Boston. Boston bricklayers' and
masons' unions learned last week
from International President William
J. Bowen, General Secretary William
Dobson and ' First Vice-President
Thomas R. Preece, that the big St.
Paul union has Joined the Interna
tional Washington. John. P. Frey, editor
of the Molders Journal, and B. A. Lar
ger of the United Garment Workers'
of America are the fraternal delegates
to the British Trade congress-i
Boston. Boston cabinetmakers' and
millmen's union sent $50 to help the
strikers in Sweden.
Indianapolis. Ind. It Is orobabl
that a convention of union clear ma
kers of Indiana will be held this fall
as the result of a circular letter that
has been sent out by Cigar Makers'
Union No. 215 of Logansport, Ind. The
Logansport local suggests that local
unions of the cigar makers In the
state sending delegates to the South
Bend convention of the Indiana State
Federation of Labor instruct their
delegates to arrange for a meeting of
cigar makers' delegates. It is thought
the cigar makers' . delegates to the
State Federation will make arrange
ments for a state meeting. The un
satisfactory condition of the cigar .in
dustry in the state is assigned as the
reason for a " meeting, iif order that
the thing may be discussed "and some
plan to remedy present conditions for
mulated. It Is suggested In the cir
cular that it might be well to organ
ize something after the lines of the
blue label" leagues in some other
states, for the purpose of booming the
cigar makers' union label. It Is ap
parently the opinion of some union
people of this city, who are not mem
bers of the cigar makers' organiza
tion, that the closing of saloons, by
reason of local option, is having a bad
effect on the union cigar makers. It
explained that the saloon is more like
ly than the drug store to carry union
label cigars, and that the closing of
saloons in many towns means a de
creased consumption of union
smokes."
Chicago. The last shadow of the
trouble between the street railway
companies of Chicago and their em
ployes, which threatened to lead to a
strike of great proportions, has passed
away. Formal peace under a 3 -year
contract was agreed upon at a meet
ing between the officials of the com
panies and of the unions. The -propo
sition made by President John M.
Roach of the North and West side
lines, which foreshadowed peace, was
maae to tne South side unions by
resident T. E. Mitten. It was ac
cepted by President M. E. Buckley,
representing the union men. The new
men are given 23 cents an hour for
the first six months, 24 cents for the
next six months, 25 cents for the sec
ond year, 26 cents for the third year
ana 27 cents until the contract ex
pires, February 1, 1913.
TIT tt A
tvasmnsran. mere was a queer
strike in St. Petersburg, Russia, re
cently. The trolley lines of that city
nad never, since they began operation,
changed their labor schedule. Motor-
men and conductors worked 19 hours
a day, with every second day off. It
recently dawned on the authorities
that many accidents might possibly
De due to the 19-hour system and a
new schedule was adopted, making
eight hours a day's work and cancel
ing the "off' day. As compensation
for the loss of a day's rest the pay
was so arranged that the men would
receive five rubles more a week than
under the old arrangement. In short,
the" reform meant fewer hours and
more pay, but the conductors and mo-
tormen, yearning for the day off, want
ed no change and the strike followed.
Washington. Labor unions have for
a long time recognized the necessity
for uniform labor laws among the
states. On this point Charles P.
Neill, United States commissioner of
labor, argues that there should espe
cially be uniformity in the laws re
garding employers' liability, the
guarding of dangerous machinery, In
dustrial hygiene, compulsory reports
on a uniform basis of all industrial ac
cidents and the compulsory registra
tion of deaths, showing facts as to oc
cupation, etc. He also favors uniform
ity of legislation regulating the em
ployment of women and children, the
hours of labor of all employes In inju
rious occupations, factory and mine in
spection and all convict-made pro
ducts.
Hartford City, Ind. The strike of
the cutters and flatteners of the
American Window Glass Company
took on a most serious aspect when
48 strike-breakers arrived here from
Chicago to take the places of the
strikers. They were met at the train
by the strikers and induced to refuse
to take the places. The men stated
that they had been informed by an
agency in Chicago that they could
make from $20 to $30 a week and that
there was no trouble on here. When
they learned that a strike was on and
that they had been promised bigger
wages than the strikers were demand
ing they refused to go to work.
Washington. There is a union of
hatmakers in Le Mans, France, In
which the office of president, vice-
president, secretary and treasurer are
held by one man.
Newburgh, N. Y. At a conference
held here a union was effected of the
organization known as the Interna
tional Brotherhood of Boilermakers
and Iron Ship Builders and United
Brotherhood of North America. The
name of the amalgamated bodies will
be the International Brotherhood of
Boilermakers and Iron Ship Builders
of the United States.
Lynn, Mass. A convention of the
Massachusetts Federation of State,
City and Town Employes held hero re
cently, adopted a resolution in favor
of a $2.50 wage and pay for all holi
days. ,
Owned by Stockholders of the First National Bank
THE &ANK FOR THE WAGE-EARNER
INTEREST PAID AT FOUR PER CENT
Tenth and O Streets
Lincoln, Nebraska
00000Q00000000030
I WORKERS UNION I
II UNI STAMP I
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Named Shoes are Often Made
in Non-union Factories.
DO NOT BUY
ANY SHOE
no matter what its name un
less it bears a plain and read
able impression of this Union Stamp.
All Shoes toithout the Union Stamp
are Altcays Non-Union
Do not accept any excuse for the absence of the
UNION STAMP.
BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Sumner St., Boston, Mass:
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FARMERS and
MER CHA NTS BA NK
F.rfMi.kJ 1QA1
1STN & 0 STREET .
11 A MTCTi' 10,000 men, women and children to start accounts at this bank of
"'--' ONE DOLLAR each and put a dollar a month In the bank. You
can do it H you will. Open Saturday evenings from 6 to 7. Four per cent interest.
Get Into the habit of having a bank account. It pays. ,
Open an account today at
THE EAST O STREET BANK
(?&
Chilly Weather
.
Cheerfulness
These mornings make you think of the f ur
nace, eh? And coal bills? But what's the use
of worrying yet there's lots of time. Chilly
mornings and evenings? They can be cured at
small expense smaller than worrying and feed-
ing the furnace.
A Gas Heater
Does the Work
Attach it to the gas jet in dining room, sit
tiug room or bath room. , No work, no worry.
A cent or two and the room is comfortably
warm, and the furnace out of business for weeks
and weeks to come. Cheaper and cleaner and
better. With the furnace you must use enough
coal to heat the house and most of it wasted
these days. The gas heater merely gives you
the heat you need, where you need it and when.
Ask the Users Their Advice
We'll stand that test you ask those who
are using the heater these days. Several thous
and of them, and you ought to among the num
ber. We sell the heaters, good ones, at a low price.
Lincoln Gas and
Electric Light Go.
OPEN 'EVENINGS
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