The Wageworker. (Lincoln, Neb.) 1904-????, November 14, 1908, Image 4

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    WA6EW0RKER
5
OFFICE OF
Dr. R. L. BENTLEY
SPECIALIST CHILDREN
Office Hours 1 to 4 p. m.
Offlc 2118 O St. Both Phone
LINCOLN. NEBRASKA
KCUE SAM WANTS YOU
od thousand of other, who are
capable, to work for him. Com
mon school education sufficient.
No political influonco required.
Steady employment, highest salar
ies, vaHon with full pay. 8.0UU
o.lnrka nMAded for the Cnnua Otlire
alone in addition to the usual 40,000
appointed yearly in the internal Revenue,
CuHtoma. Postal, Railway Mall and other
branches of the service of the U. S. Also
appointment in Philippine Islands and
Panama. Full particulars free concern
ing; all positions, salaries, examinations
(hold soon in every state), sample examin
ation questions, etc. Address
MTI0ML COIIESPOIDEUE INSTITUTE,
44S M Uhotil lilt Ml-, Wlllligtoi, 0. C.
Vageworkers, Attention
"We have Money to Loan
on Chattels. Plenty of it,
too. Utmost secrecy.
KELLY & NORRIS
19 So. Ilth St.
LINCOLN SKINT CO.
ETHEL B. ANDERSON. Proprietor.
Exclusive Retailers. Manufacturers of
HitMrrit, Midt-to-lleisire Petticoats
1235 N Street. Lincoln. Nebr.
Dutton & Ward
Furnaces, Sheet Iron and Tin
Work, Hot Water Heating, Cor
nices, Steel Ceilings and Sky
lights, General Repair Work.
2011 O ST, LINCOLN, NEB.
Avto 1598 Bell FS62
WILL M. MAUPIN, EDITOR
Union Hade. The Best Made. Take oo Other
Made by CUTTER CROSSETTE. Chlcaco
GOVERNMENT POSITIONS
46,712 AppolDtments MSK
pastycar. OoodUrpoitjoniiiU64otoM,fcwvr
Ttwr. Excellent opiHH-uralUt for yonna people.
TiiorouKli Imtrnctlon by mail. write for our
?tTil Servian AnnouuomMnt.eontailiillttfuUllifunnition
about all goremiiiwit examinations and quuiuoiu ro.
emtly uard by Um 1'ivil Kwrvuw ('oiumluion.
COLUMBIAN CORRKP. COLLEGE. WASHINGTON. D. C.
EARN BIG MONEY-
1 C n .00 Instruction for $ I fl .00
3 (J I LEARN AT HOwTI U
CAmltt itulructioikdouMe ntrv boofckeDlnar.
rM-nukavrtkiitrt. DuainvM iQnui, ttooica. mat rift is 1
fro 1 bo other outlay Uood povUlotu wftitlng.
Dfjft I, CNcto BmlMti Trailing School, Chicago
DR. GHAS.YUNGBLDT
DENTIST
ROOM 202, BURR BLK.
ggESlj LINCOLN, NEB.
Published Weekly at 137 No. 14th
St., Lincoln, Neb. One Dollar a Year.
Entered as second-class matter April
31, 1904, at the postofflce at Lincoln,
Veb., under the Act of Congress oi
March 3rd, 1879.
"Printers Ink," the recog
nized authority on advertis
ing, after a thorough Investi
gation on this subject, says:
"A labor paper Is a far bet
ter advertising medium than
an ordinary newspaper In
comparison with circulation.
A labor paper, for example,
having 2,000 subscribers Is of
more value to the business
man who advertises in It
thi an ordinary paper with
12,000 subscribers.''
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JUDGE TAFT AND LABOR.
Judge Taft has announced his pur
pose to do everything possible to put
labor on an equality with capital and
give labor an equality of opportunity
in the negotiations between theui.
This is somewhat different from the
view held by Abraham Lincoln, who
insisted that labor was superior to cap
ital and entitled to much more consid
eration. But it seems a far cry from
the republicanism of Abraham Lincoln
to the republicanism that triumphed
in 1908.
I
i
- We are expert cleaners, dysts
aa4 laiahara ol Ladles' and Gam- ti
tlSBM's ClotblBX of aU kinds.
The ftasat dresses a speolslty.
TOT NEW niU'
J. C. WOOD & CO.
AojC for pricelist.
PHONES: Bell, 147. Auto, ltI.
ISM N 8L - - Llnooln, Neb.
IXXXXXKXJJt V WXX
HAYPEN'S ART STUDIO
New Location; 1127 O
Fins wrk a Specialty.
Aato 3336
SOMEWHAT PERSONAL.
On the evening of November 3 the
Lincoln Ad Club held its regular
monthly dinner, at which time Mr.
Ed A. Higgins, advertising manager
of the Brandeis & Sons Co. of Omaha,
proprietors of the Boston Store, de
livered an address on the topic, "Poa
try in Advertising vs Advertising in
Poetry."
The Wageworker begs the indul
gence of its readers for reproducing
a portion of Mr. Higgins' address in
11 ;u of the usual grist of editorial
matter1. The portion reproduced la
personal to the editor of this little
paper, but perhaps he will be par
doned for the little streak of vanity
which impels him to reprint it.
Mr. Higgins discussed the value of
poetry in advertising and mentioned
several . notable incidents wherein
this form of publicity was productive
of commercial results. He instanced
the "Spotless Town" and "Sunny
Jim" advertising, but gave it as his
opinion that the average "poetic ai
vertlsing" was pretty poor stuff. Theii
branching off from the' commercial
Into the sentimental Mr. Higgins said
and here's where the editor of The
Wageworker blushes and bows his a
knowledgements to Mr. Higgins' kind
ness: 1
You have another poet in Lincoln
one whose fame has traveled far. In
the midst of his grind on newspaper
work he stops abruptly once in a
while and bursts into song. His sub
jects vary from communion with na
ture to philosophizing on the cant and
veneer of life and in all lie shows the
soul of the true poet. I refer to Will
Maupin. Who can read that little gem
of poetry he wrote entitled "The
Baby's Shoes" without feeling his
heart swell to the breaking point with
love and sympathy? Mr. Maupin, too
has written advertising poetry, al
though he has done so unwittingly
but he has hot gone to the commer
cial world for his subject. : He chose
the typical American home (his own)
and the love that exists therein.
There is no mercenary reward for
advertising that, but, oh, the other t.
wards that count so much IQ life l-e
so rich.
I can close my eyes and see him
wending his way home after a hard
day's work, a little brown-eyed boy
and a golden-haired girl run to greet
him. The door gained, a pudgy little
fist grasps his features with a bpo
boo for welcome. A steaming hot
dinner served by the best woman in
the world and then the fireplace and
easy chair with "My Three."
"Eyes o' Brown and Sunny Hair,.
And Dickey Winktum Wee, (
Two beside my easy chair
And one upon my knee;
Thus the evenings come and go
Till Mr. Sandman's call,
Set three wee heads to nodding low
And tired eyelids fall.
'This Is the way to sleepy town,
Jump into bed and cuddle down.'
Eyes o' Brown wants 'an'mal tales,
Of bears and woolly things,
While Sunny Hair most loudly wails
For whirr of fairy wings.
But Dickey Winktum Wee just winks
His laughing eyes at me
I wonder what the young man thinks
Perched there upon my knee?
'So sing hey ho for Sleepy town.
Jump into bed and cuddle down.'
Once there was a big black bear'
Two pairs of eyes grow bright,
Two forms press closer to my chair
As if to banish fright;
'And once there was a brave young
boy,'
Then-dimpled faces shine.
While I with fairy lore add Joy
To those sweet tots of mine.
But Dickey Winktum Wee just crows
Till off to Sleepytown he goes.
'Now I lay me down to sleep'
The goodnight prayers are said,
The fleecy clouds of slumber creep
Above each little head.
Eyes o' Brown and Sunny Hair,
And Dinkey Winktum Wee,
God guard and keep from ev'ry care
My little ones for me.
Safe in the shades of Sleepytown,
Tucked in bed and the light turned
down. . '
The greatness of our republic the
wonderful achievements in the world
of science, art or mislnessr the suc
cess of almost every venture all rest
upon the one foundation the home.
If I were asked what is the secret
of the giant strides made by this
country I would point to the ordinary
American homes as typified in Mr.
Maupin's beautiful poem.
The future will be just as rosy as
long as homes like this exist and we
owe a tribute to the mind that can so
skilfully handle the spark of 1 homo
love and home enthusiasm thus adver
tising our true greatness to ourselves
and all the world. '
Making cabinets for President Taft
seems to be a popular pastime, so we
take occasion to .jump into the game.
Here's our frame-up: For secretary
of state, James W. VanCleave; for
secretaryof the Interior, Charles W.
Post; for secretary of commerce anl
labor, David M. Parry; for secretary
of war, Harrison Gray Otis; for at
torney general, Timothy J. Mahoney;
for secretary of the treasury, Andrew
Homestead Carnegie; for secretary of
the navy, ex-Congressman Littlefield;
for secretary of agriculture, Dan
Keefe. Can you beat it?
Of course Governor Sheldon will
not, call an extra session of the legis
lature. That sort of thing would be
expected of a narrow-minded and
spiteful man, but. George Lawson
Sheldon is too big, too broadminded
to take such a step.
Well, Gompers may have scored a
failure, but we notice that they are
taking u wonderfully active interest
in the workingmen, just the same
And they never before showed any
signs of knowing that the working
man was on earth.
When president Roosevelt carves
the roast for those "labor leaders" he
will only be advertising his smallness
in not inviting Samuel Gompers to the
conference.
Now that the commission plan of
municipal government has been en
dorsed it is up to organized labor to
get busy and pull out something bene
ficial.
Well, if Roosevelt don't slay any
more lions and tigers than he did
trusts, there will not be much shed
ding of blood in the African Jungles,
The first thing the democratic leg
islature should do is to repeal the in
famous garnishee law enacted by the
last legislature.
We wouldn't mind being commis
sioner of immigration but we'd die
before we'd let Theodore know it.
The turning down of Gompers will
be merely playing into the hanJs of
organized labor's enemies.
To the victors belong the spoils.
This is a sign for VanCleave, Post
and Parry to get busy.
With that grand old friend of labor,
oh ff ie Fa
TImT
The - Bottom 0
ir
fl When the careful and economical dresser finds the
place where he can combine the latest in style and the
best in wear, with the lowest possible price, is it to be
wondered at that he stops there and bestows his pat
ronage? And is it to be wondered at that this store
does the business ( when it always combines these
things the best values for the least money.
J There are about as many individual tastes in cloth
ing as there are individual men, and the problem is to
best suit the largest possible number of individual
tastes. This store's buyers have solved that problem
to the satisfaction of thousands of men. There is a
refinement, a dignity, about the Armstrong Clothing
that sets it apart and above the other kind. The
"above is only in style, make, fit and wear not in
the price. There is a something about our clothing
"verve' it may be that. makes it a strong appeal to
the neat, careful and economical dresser. "More v for
the Money, and Better that's this store's motto.
mm
r
Ml
0 Mil
J Extra good values for the money in suits
and overcoats from $1S to $40. This wade range
makes it possible for us to suit every purse as well as
every taste. The full value is in the fabric, the style
and the make.
OUR' BOY'S OEPARTira
. fl This is really a big store in itself. It contains more
goods than many clothing stores of huge pretensions.
Anything and everything for the boys from 2 years
old to 16. School outfitting is a strong point with
us in this department.
ArmstrtHfQ CI
Company
a
Good Clothes Merchants
James S. Sherman, presiding over the
senate, and that other grand old
friend of labor, Joseph G. Cannon,
presiding over the house, it is easy
to see where labor is going to get
off at when congress gets busy.
There is still a little too much
thinking below the belt line for or
ganized labor to make a winning po
litical fight.
The forthcoming legislature could
make a ten-strike among laboring
men by putting a crimp into the "loan
sharks."
Col. James W. VanCleave seems to
be the possessor of a very fine hand
made and non-union made vindication.
Lincoln, Nebraska, continues to be
the postofflce of the greatest citizen
of this republic.
has some industrial poetry for pri
vate recitation, not for public print
ing. . , .
Gee, but we're proud of Lincoln,
Havelock and Lancaster county.
The next time we'll test our para
chute before going up. .
labor's Bull Run will yet result in
Labor's Appomatox.
And now altogether for a labor tem
ple in Lincoln.
The editor of this little newspaper ' That was organized labor's flVst
real political battle, and a battle lost
does not mean a war lost.
Politics? O, forget it for a few
weeks.
MASQUERADE PARTY.
Auxiliary No. 11 to Typographical
Union No. 209 invite yourself, family
and friends to a masquerade party at
A. O. U. W, hall, 1007 O street, Mon
day evening, November 16, 1908.
FIRED THE FLINTS. '
About the first act of the Denver
convention of the American Federa
tion of Labor was to fire the Flint
Glass Workers over the transom. This
was done because the Flints were
poaching on the preserves of the glass
blowers.. " - .