The Red Cloud chief. (Red Cloud, Webster Co., Neb.) 1873-1923, June 29, 1900, Image 6

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Red Cloud Chief.
PUBLISHED WEEKLY.
nun cloud.
NEBBASKA
Sumo of New Zealand's experiments
In Rtato socialism seem to havo been
rcninrxnbly successful. The "Ad
vance to Settlors Department" has
just reported having IkhuciI loans to
7,000 settlcrH representing two mil
lions of money. Not one shilling lind
been lost, and not ono penny, either
of prliclpal or Interest, had remained
uncollected.
Ma Journnls, each iKilqtio In Its
wny, Jins been produced In the count"
of tin campaign In South Africa. Ono
or tv i) of theso are hnrd to beat In
(limit iitlveness, but the smallest news
jMpci In the world, hnvlng n record of
Boverul years' regular weekly Issue, Is
publUntd In (luadalajarn, In Mexico.
Its tif.me Is "B Teh-grafo," It appears
evcrj Smdny and Is published In eight
coitions, 1-1 ia Indies long ,and ono and
n halr Inches wide, on thick Manila pa
per. Its BlnfT Includes nn editor and
director, an administrator or business
maimger, the printer, anil laRt, but by
no mran.s least, t!io capitalist or owner.
Thl French fleet Is to bo provided
with d new quick-firing gun, said to
bo superior to any now In use, nnd
nn order has been given to tho Buello
works, Ch.'ircnte, for the supply of 100
of thsse cannon to tho fleet before tho
end pf the year. Tho gun Is of 1G mil
limeters (6.3 Inches) caliber, thrown a
projectile of f.2 kilos (111 pounds), has
n mi'Mlc velocity of 000 meters (2.9G2
foot-ieconds), nnd can bo fired flvo
tlme9 per minute. The projectiles will
plnrco steel armor plate of 32 centi
meters (12.C Inches) In thickness and
of 20 centimeters (7.8 Inches) up to
3,000 meters.
At the recent marriage of tho Crown
I'rlneo of Jnpan, Immense multitudes
In the Btreets watched nnd applauded
tho bridal procession, but not a poi
son looked out of nn upper window.
To tho American oyo and mind this
seemod strange. Hut thu Japanese ex
piation of It was simple. It Is con
trary to etiquette Indeed, to loyalty
for a Jnpanrso to look down, either
literally or figuratively, upon a mem
ber, of tho royal family. Ono smiles
nt tho attaint conceit that would In
terpret the visual nngle as a Blight.
Yet thero Is much that Is ndmlmblo
nnd worthy of emulation In scrupulous
regard for what ure esteemed duty and
honor.
Tho Hon. Henry Copclnnd, who suc
ceedsSlrJullan Salomons as agent-gen-ernl
for New South Wales In london.
was. like tho premier of New Zealand,
originally a working miner. Ho spent
years on tho Hallarat goldflelds In Vic
toria before ho settled In Sydney, ono
of tho divisions of which ho represent
ed In parliament until his recent pro
motion to London. In a farewell edi
torial a Sydney paper says of him:
"A working miner ho was, and n work
ing miner ho remains. He still ex
presses himself ns of old In vigorous
and unadorned Anglo-Saxon that will
make Mr. Chamberlain sit up when the
pair commence to negotiate on con
troversial colonial questions."
Dr. Andrew Gerber, n wealthy phys
ician of Mount Joy, modo a peculiar
will, In which he devised to bis son
Christian, only one-half tho Income
during llfo of ono of his farms. Al
most the entire residue of his estate,
amounting to nliaut $200,000, was be
queathed to his great grand-children,
of whom none was In existence at tho
time of the decedent's death. Dr. Ger
ber held strango religious views and
believed that at the time his youngest
grandchild would arrive at tho ago of
22 years, he (tho deceased) would re
turn to earth, and he desired his estato
kept Intact until that time. Tho will
was contested and tho Supreme court
gave Christian Gerber absolutely nil
that part of tho estato bequeathed to
tho future generations.
Sensntlonnl morganatic marriages
seem to bo tho order of tho day In tho
Austrian Imperial family; for after
those of tho Countess Stephnnlo do
Lonyny and Archduke Franz Ferdi
nand It now nppears that the beautiful
Archduchess Maria Theresa has peti
tioned tho emperor for permission to
mnrry her master of tho household,
MaJ.-Gen. Count Cavrlunl. Tho arch
duchess, who Is tho widow of tho
Archduko Chnrles Insula, tho emperor's
urouier, wnose third wlfo sho was, Is
n princess of Ilragaliza, and In her
45th year. Sho has been n widow Just
four years. Curiously enough, sho is
the stepmother of Archduko Franz
Ferdinand, who has morganntically
married the Countess Sophlo Chotek.
The archduchess hns two daughters,
the Archduchesses Maria AnnonclntU
nnd Elizabeth, 24 nnd 22 years old re
spectively, who, with their cousin, tho
emperor's granddnughtor, nre at pres
ent the belles of the Imperial court.
Count Cavrlanl Is n fine-looking, sol
dierly man, slightly older than his
royal flanceo.
According to tho Philadelphia Roc
ord, a great deal of tho paper money
that Is In constant circulation In Am
erica gets frequent washing. In some
banks there Is a regular wash-day ev
ery month, when a clerk mnv h .-on..
'bent over a tub rubbing notes up nnd
'down on a wash-board. Tho dirty
greenbacks nre soaped nnd rubbed Just
like handkerchiefs nnd socks, nnd nro
put through a wringer boforo i.ni.,,,.
.put out to dry. After tho notes havo
ibeen passed through tho wrlngor they
tare- hung on n lino stretched In tho
banli clerks' department.
FEAR THMVORST.
London Looks for Startling
News from China,
NO ASSURANCE RECEIVED FROM PEKIN
.Situation More (lliinmy With Every De
port Itellef Fnrer nt Tl'ii Tutu
Atnerlran nnd llumtlan '
re Iteln forced.
A Che Foo, Tuesday, June 20 ills
patch says: Hear Admiral KempIT re
ports by ii Japanese torpedo boat that
the combined force's entered Tien Tsin
on Saturday, June 2.1, sustaining small
loss. They started on Sunday to re
lieve the force which left Tien Thin on
June 10 and which Is believed to be
surrounded near I'ekln. According to
Japanese reports Admiral Seymour has
been captured and the ministers have
left l'ekin, guarded by Chinese soldiers.
Their whereabouts Is unknown.
The llrittsli cruiser Terrible, says n
London Juno 'JO dlspitoh, hns arrived
at Che I'oo from Tnku with the latest
news, which Is as follows:
Bight hundred Sikhs and 200 Welsh
fuslleers have effected a junction with
the American, German and Russian
forces, which had been cut off by the
Chinese about nine miles from Tien
Tsln. It was proposed to deliver an
assault upon the. Chinese forces at
Tien Tsln Sunday night.
It Is not clear what forces united. It
would seem thn,t one relieving force,
cut off, had been relieved by another.
At any rate, it Is apparently eertnln
that the allies arrived in sullleient
force at Tien Thin Sunday to uttaek
the besieging Chinese.
WANTS AUMISTICi:.
Chine Milliliter Urge United States
to Hcml No More Troop.
The chief development today In the
Chinese situation was the effort of the
Chinese minister, Wu Ting Fang, to
secure an armistice in the operation of
American troops until LI Hung Chang
could reach I'ekln and bring about a
cessation of the disorder. The propo
sition Is rather a novel one, and is
based upon the representations of the
viceroys of the important provinces of
the Yang Tse Kiting valley that they
can maintain order without the aid of
foreign troops, and that the presence
of the foreigners would act merely as
au incentive to disorder.
Minister Wu brought these repre
sentations to the attention of Secretary
Hay, who consulted the president. The
hitter's decision, as subsequently pre
sented to the minister, was that while
the assurances of the viceroy for con
tinued quiet was fully appreciated, the
United States could not bind itself not
to send its forces to points where dis
order actually existed and where the
safety of our otlleials and citizens were
endangered. Technically speaking, in
the absence of a state of war. this was
not a proposition of armistice, but
high government ofllcials say thnt It
amounted practically to an offer of
armistice and a refusal on the part of
the United States to make the arrange
ment. Ilnvo Abandoned Warpath
A IMioenlx, Ariz., dispatch savs that
II. P. GUI of Philadelphia, who Is
hero from n prospecting tour in
Mexico, says the Ynqui Indians
have all practically abandoned the
warpath. Ho says several hundred
are still hidden in the mountains and
make an occasional descent on Isolated
ranches. Near Tomaehlo on Friday
last a large party raided a ranch and
killed two cowboys, wounded several
others and one woman. They were
driven off after a hard light.
Tornittlu Follow Flood.
A tornado, which originated near
Blossburg, Jefferson county, Alabama,
swept the country for fifteen miles
westward Into Walker county. Its
paili was a quarter of a mile wide and
the greatest damage resulted around
Democat, where a score of houses were
wrecked and a number of persons in
jured more or less seriously. Crops
were ruined utul hundreds of trees up
rooted. '
World' W. C. T. U.
An Bdlnburgh, June 2.1 dispatch
says: Tho World's Women Christian
Temperance union congress reassem
bled today under the presidency of
Mrs. llnsley. The American delegates
are greatly concerned at the serious
Illness of Mr. James Norton (principal
of the Lakevlew college of Chicago) at
Southampton. Lady Henry Somerset
nnd the convention sent telegrams of
Inquiry and sympathy today,
NolirnRlcnn Die In F.uKlund,
A Columbus special says: News has
Just reached this place of the death at
Loudon,England,of Charles T. Cockson,
u prominent and wealthy farmer, liv
ing seven miles south of town in Polk
county, who left in May with his wife
to spend several months In Burope and
who Is known to have been In good
health up to a few days before his
death.
Killed All Three.
At Granite, n nsv tmvn in (freer
county, Oklahoma, Cattle Inspector
Jeff Gilmorc, Kill Anderson, another
man and a woman engaged in n game
of cards. They quarreled and drew
guns. Gilmorc shot and killed his
three assailants.
Blmt noun,
Sheriff Ne.il Morrison wns wounded
and two of his deputies killed near
Cloud Chief, Okla., while pursuing
George Casey and n man named Me
Kce. whp had broken jail at Arapahoe.
RECEIVES FEARFUL INJURIES
Itnnawny Arrldi-nt nt Hunting May
Itrautt In Death.
A Hastings Neb., dispatch hays: Mrs.
Will Heffron Is lying at the point of
death ns the. result of a runaway acci
dent and the physicians have given up
till hope of her recovery. She had been
out driving nnd ns returning from
the northeastern part of the city when
herhoihc became frightened and rn.i
away. She was thrown from the bug
gy, her face coming first in contact
with the hard road. Her features were
mangled nlmost beyond recognition,
and sho was picked up in an uncon
scious condition. Although the phy
sicians have worked over her for some
time, It is thought she cannot possibly
live.
MURDERED BY BOXERS
MIlonnrle 1'roiu Delaware, )., Knniwi
to llo I)i nd.
A Delaware. O., June 23 dispatch
says: Hev. Dr. Leonard of this city,
secretary of the foreign missionary so
ciety of the Methodist Bplscopal
church, has received seml-olllelal iicwr
from Tien Tsln that Hev. Dr. Pyke and
wife and ltev. Norman Hayuer and
wife, missionaries, till formerly of Del
aware, have been murdered by Chinese
lHJxers.
(letting In Trim.
The war branch of the United Stntes
government is preparing for any event
uality that may arise out of the Chi
nese situation. As stated by one of
the highest oflleers of the army, the
scale of preparation Is of a magnitude
which would both interest and sur
prise the public. Hut, he added, tho
Information would, be of even greater
interest and service to any foreign foe
which the United States may be called
upon to fnce within the next few
weeks or months, and, for that reason,
there is no purpose to make public the
complete preparations making to meet
whatever Issue arises. All that the
ofllcials will say Is that the army nnd
the navy, if the occasion arises, will
give a good account of themselves.
Oregon I Under Way.
Word has reached the navy depart
ment that the battleship Oregon got
away from Houg Kong bound for
Tnku. This is two days ahead of her
expected start. She took on 10 1 sailors
and marines brought to Hong Kong by
the Zallro. The big ship may now
have u chance to repeat her celebrated
performance "around the horn," as she
is being crowded for n fast run to the
scene of action. The distance Is about
1.500 miles, and, If she makes record
time she will be at Title ii in six days,
about the same time that the Brooklyn
arrives from Manila. These ships are
the only ones going to China.
Taylor' Health llrokcn.
llrokcn In health and spirits. ex-Governor
W. Taylor of Kentucky has gone
to Niagara Palls. He was accompan
ied by Mrs. Taylor, and four detec
tives followed close at their heels.
Two of the ollicers represent the state
of Kentucky and bear warrants for
the arrest of Mr. Taylor upon charges
growing out of the assassination of
Governor Gocbcl. The other two are
employed by Mr. Taylor to guard his
person.
Tnnmclo In No Man' l.uml.
A tornado passed over Heaver county,
formerly known as No Man's Land,
says a Guthrie.. Oklti., dispatch. Henry
I!ardvoll, Steve Bird and Abe Wights
man were killed and William Hammer
and Paul Khodes fatally Injuteil. The
storm swept the country for sixty
miles. Hundreds of cattle were stam
peded and mi'ny killed and Injured.
Several houses were destroyed.
Deulc n .Statement.
Admiral Crowninshield pronounces
ns untrue tho reports that the gun
boats Marietta, Princeton and several
other ships at Manila have been or
dered to T.iku. There is felt to be no
need for them, nnd, nioreover.with the
ships now under otdersto sail Admiral
Remcy will have a force which is con
sidered abundantly able to meet every
possible requirement.
Churned With Statutory Itnpr.
Jesse George, the young man who is
charged with statutory rape on a
twolve-yeur-old girl near Lushton,
Neb., recently, has been taken to York
by Sheriff Lancaster and lodged in tho
county jail. He was appreheuded near
Peru. The case will be heard July 2,
and (n default of giving SdOU bond, the
young man was placed in Jail.
Order to Kill.
A Shanghai dispatch says: It is ofll
chilly said that the dowager empress
has Issued emphatic instructions for
the extermination of all foreigners in
China. Large numbers of refugews are
arriving here from the north. All is
quiet here and in the Yng Tse Kiang
valley.
Krnu Not to Itealirn.
A letter has been received by the
Chattanooga, Tenn., News from Com
missioner of Pensions Evans in which
he denies the story published several
days ago to the effect that he would
resign as pension commissioner and
run for congress.
Iteliel Are Well Armed.
Oriental advices by the steamer Tnr
tar, state that ai'cordlng to a Canton,
China, correspondent, a rebellion is ex
pected to break out in Kwan Twin
province at any time. Bnormous quan
tities of Mauser rifles and quick firing
guns havo been smuggled in nnd it is
said that 2,000 troops may be put in
the Held. Viceroy LI Hung Chang Is
attempting to nip the rebellion in the
bud, but so far has been unablo to do
so. Thousands of discontented people
are said to lie rallyinL' to the black
I flags or the rebel chiuttalns.
WILLSENp ARMY
United States Must Bear Its
Part in China.
GENERAL CHAFFEE TO TAKE COMMAND
Adequate Military I'orec Orders Iued
liiHtntct Him to On Dlreet to 1'rkln
Itellef of Urn Tln tho Only
Neui at Wellington.
A Washington, June 20, dispatch
says: The purpose of the government
to place an adequate military force in
C 'na was made perfectly clear toduv
when orders were issued to Ilrlgadler
General Atlna It. Chaffee to take mm.
mand of the forties In China and to
jnoceed at once to assume his new
duties. More significant, probably,
than the assignment Itself was the
wording of this formal orders to Gen.
oral Chaffee, issued late in the day by
Acting Secretary of War Mnlklefnlm.
directing him "to take command of
tne troops ordered to China." and to
proceed to I'ekln by wuy of Snn Fran
cisco and Tnku. tientnnimlid W 1,U
aides. It has been expected that the
inuiwiry forces would be concentrated
at Che Foo or some other convnnient
military base, hut the direction to pro
ceed to Pckin, the capital of the Chinese
empire, indicated a firm determination
on the part of the government au
thorities to have a strong military
lorcc at tne capital of the Chinese
government. The announcement, .if
General Chaffee's assignment, nnd the
orders 10 proceed to I'ekln, came after
wie state department had declined to
accede to a second nronositlon from
six great vlce.ioysof China that foreign
iroops Dc uopt out of China until Li
Hung Chang reaches Pekin.
Secretary Loni' renetvrwl nrt),1nr .Lin
ing the day beyond the early dispatch
from Admiral Kempff stating that the
combined forces hud entered Tien Tsln
and that the Seymour expedition was
reported ten miles from Tien Tsin,
surrounded. This cleared up one sit
uation only to present another condi
tion which may prove even more grave.
General Chaffee who is staying at
the Arlington hotel, was iriven a sere-
nude tonight by the Third cavalry
oiiiiti, oi which regiment he was lieu
tenant colonel before the war with
paiu. The general said tonight he
would leave the city tomorrow morn
ing for San Francisco, whence he is to
sail on the transport Grant for .lan.in
nnd Chinn. Heyond this definite news
in regard to sending a force to China,
the only news of importance Is con
tained in dispatches confirmatory of
the relief of Tien Tsin, and that the
Pekin expedition is ten miles from
Tien Tsln, surrounded.
Dewey Cannon Unveiling.
The programme for the ceremonies
connected with the unveiling of the
Dewey cannon at Three Oaks. Mich.,
is substantially complete. The ad
dress of welcome on behalf of the state
of Michigan will be delivered by Gen
eral K. A. Alger, and the oration of
the day by William Ilnrton, I). I)., of
Chicago, on the theme "The Victories
of Peace and of War." The unveiling
of the Dewey cannon will be per
formed by Miss Helen Miller Gould.
Want to Parade.
Adjutant General Harry is kept busy
granting permission to national guards
men to take part in Fouith of July
celebrations. Recently Company A.
Second regiment, with headquarters at
Kearney, and Company C, First regi
ment, Ileatrice, were given permission
to parade with arms and participate in
Fouith of July celebrations. One or
two companies of the guard will take
part in sham battles and the state will
furnish blank cartridges.
I.oc Fifty-live Thtiuinnd Dollar.
II. K. Dnllleld, Chicago board of
trade broker, was robbed of S.Vi.flOO
while riiling on a Cottage Grove avenue
cable ear. The money was in bonds,
mining stock and deeds, which Mr.
Duflicld wius taking to the bank. The
robbery Is credited to professional
pickpockets, who, it is believed, have
been watching board of trade men
credited with making heavy profits on
the big bulge in wheat. Mr, Dutlield
could give the police no clew.
Complain to (iovernor.
Governor Poynter has received a
complaint from WoUmch, Greeley coun
ty, that persons there were killing
whole coveys of young prairie chick
ens. The governor cannot take action,
further than to send copies of the state
law to the Interested people. The
open season for killing prairie chickens
is from September 1 to January 1, and
the tine for killing outside tho open
ficuson is S" for each bird slaughtered,
Ilrnnkljn doing to Tuku.
The United States armored cruiser
Hrooklyn withllOO marines from Cavite
has sailed for Nagasaki, where she
will coal, and 'from which place she
will go to Taku. Col. Uobert I. Meade
is in command of the marines. The
U. S. transport Logan, with the Ninth
infantry, and the United States gun
boat Princeton will follow.
Chlim Muke Formal lteiuet.
In more formal manner, with tho
signatures of six viceroys representing
the greater part of the empire, Minis
ter Wu repeated Tuesday his plea of
tho previous day that tho foreign
troops bo kept out of tho country.
Secretary Hay laid the formal request
of the viceroys before the cabinet meet
lug, but thero was no disposition to
vary from the president's determina
tion, ulrendy made public by Secretary
Hay to the Chinese minister, to send
our forces to such points as were
menaced and where our ofllcials and
citizens were in ilanyir.
SHOOTS HIS BROTHER DEAD
Now Drought to Wyninro, Neb., of a
KuiiRit Traced)-.
Jako Hakcr shot and killed his
brother, Pete linker, at the home of
the latter in Hanover, Kits., and after
seeing the result of his deadly aim
turned the weapt n on himself nnd
would have taken his ovn life had not
his wife and the wife of the murdered
man stopped him, He then walked
across the street and gave himself up
to nn oflicer. The story of the shoot
ing nnd the trouble which led up to It,
ns told is to the effect thnt the two
brothers were running a beer stand at
a Sunday picnic near Hanovernnd that
sometime during the day I'ete became
Intoxicated and had a' light. Later
the two brothers and their wives, who
nre sisters, were at Pete's home settl
ing up the day's business, when Jake
made the remark that the only thing
to mar the pleasure of the picnic was
the fight I'ete had. This remark is
said to have angered Pete, who was
still under the Inllucnce of liquor, and
he attacked his brother and finally put
him under a table. Jake tried to get
out, but was put hack, and told by
Pete that he would kill him If he came
out, but Jake was too quick and jump
ing out from under the table he grab
bed a gun and shot his brother twice,
killing him instantly. The coroner's
jury exonerated Juke linker, the shoot
ing being in self-defense.
BREAKING THROUGH A NET
Itoer I'laylnB n l.liely (lame of Hide
and Seek.
A London dispatch says: Lord Rob
erts' six columns are converging ap
parently so us to close in upon the
Free Staters, although decisive results
cannot be expected for several days.
A number of Hocrs who were sup
posed to be within the wide-thing net
have broken or rather stolen through
General Bundle's Fieksburg-Senekal
lines. The Canadians were engaged
in the Honingspruit fight last Friday.
General Dewet'.s men cut off a Canad
ian outpost of mounted rifles at dawn,
two being killed. Lieutenant Trlgils
and four others were wounded and
three were enptured. The Free Stat
ers then attacked the camp, where
were fifty Canadians nnd two com
panies of Shropshlres, though without
much effect,' as the men were well cd
trenched.
DOUBLETRAGEDY AT OMAHA
German Carpenter Kill HI Wife and
Commit Hutrlde.
John Stumfmeier, a German enrpen
tert living in the extreme southern
part of Omaha. Neb., shot and mortally
wounded his wife and killed himself
in their home. The tragedy was the
culmination of a night's quarrel over
domestic affairs. After shooting his
wife Stuinfinaler lighted a match and
stood over her prostrate body to assure
himself that she was dead. Knraged
by the sight of his twelve-year-old son
sobbing upon the neck of his dying
mother, Stuinfinaler kicked the hoy
off the porch and out into the street
and then going into the house shot
himself through the left eye, dying in
stantly. The woman was taken to St.
Joseph's hospital in a dying condition.
TAKESTHE LIFE OF HER SON
Widow at ChlenKii Attempt to Ille
With lilts.
Myrn Conkliug, a widow, living on
Itelden avenue, Chicago, took the life
of her nine-year-old son, John, at their
home, and then attempted her own
life. After stopping up all the crev
ices nnd cracks in the room In which
her boy slept, she turned on the gas
and lay down on the bed near him to
die. Before the deadly vapor bad
taken her life neighbors found her.
She was taken out Into the air and re
vived. Her sou was dead.
LIFT FOR STATE GUARD
Stop Taken to Draw Nhnra of One
Million Dollar.
The preliminary steps were taken
Tuesday to secure for the Nebraska
national guard its share of the Sl.ooo,
000 annual appropriation recentry
made by an act of congress. Adjutant
(lencrnl Harry certified to Adjutant
General II. C. Corbin the number of
men in the guard In the state, and In
due time over 17,000 worth of supplies
and equipment will be drawn annually
for the benetit of the guard.
LOOK FOR EARLY RELIEF
ItrltUli Central Afr'cau Force Leave
for Almntl.
The British government hns received
dispatches from Ashantl Indicating
that the relief of Kuinassi should be
accomplished thrs week. About 850
men of the British central African na
tive forces sailed June '.'Ii for Ashantl,
where they will be employed to quell
the rising. This Is tho first time that
British Central Africa has been called
upon to partake in the responsibilities
of the empire.
VnylnR off Indetitedne.
State Trcnsurer Schamber of South
Dakota will send out draft i for 805,000
to take up bonds not due for ten years.
This will leave a bonded indebtedness
for the state of 5013,000.
KnlKht of Ht. John.
The twenty-second international con
vention of the Knights of St. John has
begun nt Philadelphia with several
hundred .'mights in attendance. Mass
was celebrated at the cathedral and
the delegates then proceeded to Odd
Fellows' temple, where the convention
was called to order by Chas. W. Naulty.
Mayor Ashbrldge extended tho hos
pitality of tho city to the visiting
knights. In the parade " 000 members
of the organization participated.
A Glorious Fourth will be celebrated
In grand style at Plumvlew this year.
RUMOR OF BIG MASSACRE
Fifteen Hundred Foreigner Deported
to Have Ileen Murdered.
A London, June '-'3 dispatch says:
The silence of Pckin continues un
broken. Four thousand men of the
allied forces were having sharp defens
ive fighting nt Tien Tsin Tuesday nnd
Wednesday, with a prospect of being
reinforced Thursday. This Is the sit
uation in China as set forth In the Brit
ish government dispatches.
"Bight hundred Americans nre tak
ing part in the fighting nt Tien Tsln."
says the Shanghai correspondent of
the Daily Bxpress, cabling last even
ing, "and they apparently form a part
of a supplementary force, arriving
with Germans and British after the
conflict started. It is impossible to
estimate the number of Chinese there,
hut they had u surprising number of
guns."
This information nppears to havo
been brought by the Jnlted States
gunboat Nashville to Che Foo and tele
graphed thence to Shanghai. The
Shanghai dispatch says: It Is reported
from Japanese sources that 1,500 for
eigners have been massacred nt Tien
Tsln.
Deport of Mannacce, Doubted.
The apprehension as to the fate of
the Kuropeans cut off at Tien Tshi
have been sharpened by Admiral
Kempff's message, says a Washington
dispatch, which was the first definite
announcement of the bombardment
and destruction of the foreign conces
sions. But, in spite of Shanghai's
grim statement that the Chinese used
forty-pounders, and that 1.500 foreign
ers were massacred, there is no reason
to conclude that the foreign colony has
been unable topiotect itself. A Shang
hai dispatch reports that Tien Tsin
was bombarded for two days, that the
casualties were 100; that .1.000 interna
tional troops nre there, and that now
that the allied commanders tit Taku
are hastily pushing forward n relief
column It is hoped the worst upprehen
siouswill soon be dispelled.
WHEAT CROP RUINED
Xorthueit Crop In Dad Shape I'lonlng
Up Whole Field.
A Ihihitli, Minn., special says: Oliver
Dalrytnple, the big wheat grower of
North Dakota, says.
"I am of the opinion that two-thirds
of the spring wheat crop is killed be
vCond redemption. The Grnndin farm
is running sixty plows In the wheat
fields. I shall start plows tomorrow
and nearly all spring wheat farmers
will be plowing under wheat next
week unless heavy rains come.
A Chieago, June lit dispatch says:
The Times-Hernld tomorrow will pub
lish a crop report prepared by Snow,
the crop expert who has completed a
two weeks' trip through the states of
Minnesota, North and South Dakota.
He declares the situation a national
calamity and claims the wheat failure
there is the worst ever known. He
estimates the Dakotas as promising
only 20,000,000 bushels each and Min
nesota 35,000,000 bushels, a total of
75,000,000, against L'00.000,000 bushels
last year and 'JL'5,000,000 bushels in
lb'JS.
MUCH DAMAGE DONE
Furious Hall Storm In and Around Slour
City, luHii,
A Sioux City, In., dispatch says: By
a hail storm which passed over this
city, but which reached its worst a few
miles east of here, 75 per cent of the
crop of small grain and corn was des
troyed in the district where the storm
was most severe.
C. E. Finney, a worklngmun at the
YoungJove ranch, bud two ribs broken
by the force of hail. Another workman
had his face pounded almost to a pulp,
The ten-year-old daughter of Clem
Martin, a farmer residing near Mo
ville, got caught in the storm on her
way from school and was bruised so
badly by the large stones that It is
feared she will die. At Crit Bush's
farm six pigs and u number of chickens
were killed at different places. Horses
and cattle were knocked down by tho
force of the hail.
FIRE AT SOUTH OMAHA
Uarelioiine and Tho Cottage
Totally
Consumed.
Fire totally destroyed the feed ware
house of Arthur A. Rushland and two
cottages belonging to Frank Shllahan
at 1 wenty-fourth and Q streets, South
Omaha, The total loss will be In the
neighborhood of 87,000. It was about
4 o clock when the was discovered In
the Rushford warehouse and ti tele
phone alarm sent in,
Shot IinrliiR I.ul,r tow
During a labor row at tho Offdcn Gas
tompany's plant at Chicago, (. i.on
okomin, a contractor, was shot ami
seriously wounded by .lmcs Collins
a negro. Collins, a non-union "'
was set upon by strikers and began
shooting at his assailants. Pnoko.
mln, who happened to be passing uud
hat no hand in the trouble, receive
a bullet Intended for one of the
bikers. Collins was arrested.
Think. i,e Wllljfiurrender.
General MacArthur-wlUsoon form
Ally announce President MeKinlevV
order of amnesty. Btumcamlno Pater?
no and other prominent Filipino k-nd-crs
are greatly pleased, b they beUe u
that under the amnesty they can brim,
about the surrender of Agulnaldo . tf
Short. Nee Their Danger.
On the Network cotton evehnmro
shorts were driven to cover brepS
of bad crop conditions i the ST
J