The Red Cloud chief. (Red Cloud, Webster Co., Neb.) 1873-1923, August 21, 1885, Image 3

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RED CJ.OTJD CHIEF
k. G. HOSMER, Publisher.
RED CLOUD
- - NKHHASKA
THOSE SUN-LIT HILLS.
-On when I inure uiii iIiom; Min-lit hills
That lift thi-r i.oa'I-iiii hit-h.
JV i. -o vi-ct nnil pun my Iosoin fllLs
Thin ;! aii'l He:iv.-n seem nigh.
How .till! how jrJononely calm thoy rest!
'Jncv.-ii -:tii they -c-m;
As soiw- Tuir infant o:i It- inothors breast
Ilnsks in Its Joj -uj.reiiie.
At moiii. at 1K.011. ut ni-rht. always the Kr:ie
l!r:ir!it. run iiil -pir.t broods
Ami urii t- my r'inl nith Its ci-lst!:tl liiuno
.nJ eh le my lit I ii I mc-ols.
Tiilik those wavci iijmiii th stormy sea,
lh-stl anl lnri and -ml.
tThiit tos ami inouii, they tiring dwect pc-aco
to III".
Their spirit malic.-" in ghi'll
When worn anil wean wltli thl e:irtlily strife,
Ami whf-n Jor if-si I s.-h
I'roni storm itml I itiiy- on th- mmi of life,
To th-m I turn 1113- -.
O hills! tVJrf-S of the Infinite i-jk'o!
O how I lotnr to s
Witiini j our loom when- forever How1
Cool I.Clhe's Mreu-ii -o leej!
(J. W. 1'rojtr, wi i'hini'ji, Inlir lrfm.
A JMtKAKKAST J)ISII.
Story or tho L039 and Recovery
of a Valuable Jovol.
"And it was the mo.sl beautiful stone
that I ever saw in a linger riuir- None
of tliOMj paltry thin- 3-011 can't wear
till eandle-liht on aeeonnt of the yel
low tliere is in them. So white, so
clear, so brilliant, pellucid as a water
drop and sparkling as a .-tar! It was
nil but bi; etioujrh. too, to have a name
of its own, liliH tho-c that the royal
diamonds have -M:ir of the Four
1'oints of the Compass,' I,i;ht of lite
WotM to Come, '('lory of the, Miihlie
of the l'arlli.' 'Mother of the Moon.'
Why under the sun," cried Mis Tor
ranee, thr pretty creature in 11 be
vilchinjr jown, pouring colbe for h-r
husband, the little butler having been
dimissetl by Mr. Torrance in fear of
the wrath to come, perhaps -"shouldn't
our diamonds have names as well as
Jhoie of Kinr- and I'tieeiis ttud "
"Yours otilit to hac one." said her
bu.sbatid. muctly. "It would bu suita
ble t call now; it's in the vocative,
you know."
"Well, I must sa' I don't believe an'
man was ever so undi-turhcil by tiie
loss of such a tiling as that. Archibald,
that stone was worth a thoiteaud dollar-."
"I'eallv I oti'dit to be aware of the
fact, dear, if a 113 bod' is. You have
ollercd to sell it and procure that -um
for ii v nej-essities vtTy time I have
beti hard up since we married. And
if 1 have Md-livd an e-ted for its theft,
as ymi -uif'-st, it will eo-it an ither
thriusand be tore we are dne with it.
lor she would ceriainby be proved in
nocent, and then a lib-' suit would be
the nel thine; in order."
"Itul. Arcb Mildred can't be proved
innocent. How can .she be. when 1
know -lie took it? And there was no
one else to lake it.' And Mrs. Tor
rance pattv'd with suspended cup, her
ii-.tt wondering eyes seatchiti'X space
for a repi "It" ever nnythine; lay in a
.straight bin', it is the eidetice against
that virl.'' she c Ditiiiind. "The other
d..v '.vhen the liny; fell on the lloor she
was in the room, a.id .-he asked me
what a stone like ll at was worth, and
then ae such a sitrh that I said: I
.suppose 3011 think h's wmnjr for me to
Avear a thousand do'Iars on my linger?1
itui she s;ijil- ! wa-n't thinkiu"; of
t!:e riu;r; I was i.nly thinkini; that a
thousand dollars can do a ;reai deal of
pi..d.' The minx: 'Well.' I said, 'it
" a reat de.d of :ood in hiokinjr
r r c
lrett on niv baud.' 'Indeed it docs
look hcaulifulh here.' .-he said - she's
er pnr.icular :boul her adverbs; 1
iisii she was as particular about her
catecVstn 'but a jjood deed done b" a
hand is its mint beautiful jewel, to tin
thinking.' .Ins', hear that! To her
mistress! Arc ,u through? Why. I'e
onh 'Ust beuti."
"he is quite a iiiisionarv." said Mr.
Torrance, pii iiiii"; up hi- newspaper.
'Ami the worst of it is. she is right."
"Now, Archibald, don't, for mercy's
sake, go to reading! said his wile. "I
do think the morning news might wait
for once. It's nothing but dynamiters
Wowing up the 1'ritish Empire, and
.Arabs makirg mummies of the P.rilish
:inm - all abstractions; but mv ring is
something positive, tangible, here at
hand."
"I wish it were!" said Mr. Torrance.
'And then I could be allowed -' l'.ut
us he glanced at the loveby creature op
posite, with her reproachful brown eyes
in which stood two tears as big as the
diamond she had lost, her color going
and coming with her breath, as you
might sa and the rose-colored rib
bons of her morning cap ail a-futter
with her earnestness, he folded his
paper, and said: "Well, my dear."
"Well, 1113- dear!" mimicked Mrs.
Torrance, in derision. "I should say
it's anything but well when a man hears
f a servant insulting -actually in-ult-ing
his wife, and savs she's in the
right."
""Now. Janet, I will submit it to your
w n judgment if that's a fair interpre
tation." "You needn't do ainrthingof the sort.
It isn't fair to suppose I have any judg
ment, if what I sa3 concerning Mildred
perfectly ridiculous cognomen. Who
ver heard of Mildred for a servant's
name?"
, "Why not Mildred?"
'Win- not Gwendoline, then, or Fred
Cgonde. or '1 husnelda? How would it
seem to be telling C'ladvs to brush the
dust off my shoe? And Mildred is just
as b.-ul. If 1 had mv way, all the cooks
should be Noras, and all the second
srirls should be Kllens. and if they came
from Kngland. then they should be
Elizas and Man Anus, and it wouldn't
sound as if 3011 were taking a liberty
with your superiors when 3011;' own
name is just plain Jane. 1 ouirht to
have been Rosamond nn'self. 3011
know." s:iid jrs. Torrance, ab-entbr.
twining the grounds in her cup. "or
Katherine. or Kloise. or something.
lut I'm sure 1 have tiv.uble enough
with tin -e people without being troubled
with their names. And 1 don't leKeve
Iter name : Mil Ired. runway. 1 be
lieve it's jtist plain Mar'lin, and she
1oo- ihe Mildred. If she took my
di:ur.ond. she wouldn't stop at taking a
name. Or may be it was just Milly ",
And here Mrs. Torrance pau-ed, not
for breath, but in amazement to -cee her
husband's C3es twinkle, and he himself
lie back in his chair, as he pushed his
plate away, with a laugh lie could re
press no longer.
" she took 3our diamond. Well,
my darling, 1 am glad 3011 have ar
rived at !he diamond once more. I be
gan t- think it had been lost again.
But don't tell me about the income
tpiciiee of a woman's mind. Its work
ings are labyrinthine, but the thought
always comes out at the place It went I "Wise woman,' groaned Mr. Tor
111. Now, let u- be business-like, if we ranee.
can. Jatiet. What makes you lhink I "And go, you pee, I didn't accuse
that this jretty Mildred of our? took the ' Mildre 1 in the lirst place. I searched,
diamond?'1 " j and t-jok every prccaut'o.i- I di In't
" 1'retty Mildred! Well, iwjrhaT be- i tlmiL of such "a tiling till I -aw her
can
use h" w prcttv." said ?d . Tor- f
ranee, looking like a satirical sparrow.
"Not at all impossible," sa'.d her
husband, graveh.
" You don't mean to imph that 1
would denounce a person as a thief be
cause you said she was pr tty?" cned
Mrs Torrance, half rising to h t feet.
"I've as good a mind to leave the table
as ever I had to eat. I would, if the
buckwheat cak had come up."
"My dear child!"
You treat ni"er.cilv as if I were a
child." cr'ed the outraged wife. "What '
do I care whe'her mv maid is pr ttv or 1
not? IJe!ng pretty, apparcatlv. doe-n't (
k'-ep h- r hand fr'm piekinir and -ta!- j
ing. I know .die sole my diam nd jual !
a-, well as if I had seen h'r do it"
" I'.iit what w-.uld sh do with it?"
" hat a pie-t o ! At if that sort
of per-in didn't knw wher.- to d sp e
of th ngs as'lv aid tak care of the
pioce-ds! I wond rif 1'atricia is never
goi.ig to svut t,i..fti ake- up "
Mow in the wrid did our cook
come to be called I'atr'cin?"
"I called her -o uiy-elf when hf
came. Her own mime was Hannah, a
combination of -ootids I utleily detest,
and wa-n't goiu to have ringing in my
ears all. the t me. And she is so tall and
erect .-he lustilics Patricia. Don't vou
think .?"
"All right," .-aid Mr. Tonanee, think
ing it best to make no refeiene-: Jo the
Noras of a few minutes -nice "1'ut
we were speaking of Mildred."
"I dul think ry well of Mihlrel. I
will confess, before this." said Mr-.
Torrance, with Judicial calmness, ".she
is ediica'ing her si-ter. who has a voice
Mich a voice!--for a church .sinirer.
J when she will have a s.dar3 that will be
wealth to them, ami give -ome Je-on-besides.
And she was wrapped up in
her. An I I took an interest in them
iiry-clf, and gave her a silk dress to
mike over, and got a new cloak, that I
didn't really need so a- to give her mv
old one (and I aw she bad the 'il
taste to take oil some of the trimming),
and bits of m old music. And out of
her own wages Mildred has to hire a
room and a p ano and pay for her les
sons, .somebody gives her her hoard till
she can pay the debt, and it take- eety
cent Mildred earns; and you see it is
piite natural that -he should look
about her to find wheie she can turn a
penny "
"An honest penny," sa'd Mr. Tor
ranee. "A girl who is doing that for
another is not one that would be likely
to turn any other sort of penny."
"How vou do love to interrupt me,
Mr. Torrance' It really seems as if you
couldn't bear the sound of my voice! I
was going on to sav. before vou took
the words out of my mouth, that re
cently thi-sister of hers has been advi-etl
to take lessons of another master, who
asks all creation, but is really worth it.
And he says lie can 111 ike her voice a
fortune to her. And tl.o have been
dreadfully cast down be a use they
couldn't to it- And now you -ee where
the diamond conies in. If she can get
for that stone anything near it-s value,
her sister Mabel can take her lessons.
And her voire Is delicious - jtist perfect
ly delicious!" exclaimed Mrs. Torrance,
forgetting the diamond again "Mil
died had her come here and sing to m '.
And 1 can't de-cribe it to you. I never
heard a lark or a nightingale, but a
bobolink isn't a whistle Jo it. A lliit.
a trumpet well, it was sweet and sat-i-fying
and penetrating as the odor of
some llower. and 3et ofl as the velvet
side of the petal of the Mower. Angels
would sing so. may be, if there are .'1113.
And I was jtist carried away. I forgot
all about her sister's being mv maid. I
cried and 1 laughed, and I felt as if I
had found her. And now I will sol
eninh tell 3-011. Aiehy dear"--and -he
bent across the prett3 china service,
transfixing him with her radant C3e.s -"I
looked at my ring, and I turned
it and turue 1 it. and I aid to myself
I had had the good of it ever since
('randfather Pe Tey-ter gave it to me,
and every IhuK knew 1 bad it, and my
po-ition wa- pretty well cstnhl shed,
diamond rings or not, and when you
were aide to a (lord a ivil grown-up ut
ler. 3011 would probaldv get me plenty:
and if I so'd it now, and gave this poos
dear g rl the money to secure a career,
what a blessing it would be to her. and
what a J03" 1 should be giving to the
world in her. too; for oi course site
wouldn't be confined to a church choir
in that eas and if she were, in what a
heavenly fashion could those tones of
hers swim out over a prayeiful audience,
and jtt-t take the pr.nvron their sihen
strength, and lead it up, up: and any
hoiby who is the means of produ in
more of them, and so brings down the
price of prima donna in the market, is
a public benefactor, to be .-lire, any
way: and I was just on the point of
saying that 1 would speak to you. and
if 3-011 approved, as I knew von would,
I could have a thousand dollars or
thereabouts for them to day. when Mrs.
Veasey happened in. and so, as 1 tlidn't
want Mrs. Y:iev to know anytiiiu.:
about it, and be taking the .wind all out
of mv sails. 1 just told Mabel to come
aga 11 to day. ami I would h.ive some
thing further to s:iy to her! And so I
shall!'' cried Mrs. Torrance, taking
breath with renewed vigor. " I shall
have to tell her that her sister has been
arrested for a thief, and she nr.xy go
sing to hnr in prison. That's what I'll
tell her. the wicked, ungrateful girl!"
"Which?'' said Mr. Torrance.
"I don't know how ainbodv can b'
so unfeeling." cried his wife. "It
really oni" as if you were more in
terested in the troubles of two z
garh girls base enough to rob 3 our
wife than in vour wife's troubles.
Ho' hi"
Hut re" bery is a very harsh term.
Janet darling, when enrele-sness 111.13 uo
the whole thi.ig."
"There it i- again. My carelessness,
not their dishonest-,. W:en I went to
the wash-stand I turned the ring on
my linger a:-:'i:. and there was the
stone gone."
"And how maav ;i-r.e- have I lob!
vou that the careless habit of washing
vour hands in o'irri:u-s wear off in- ; -' s-n-nge-; paper made. Ea.-h eiaek
tiniiesimal fraclions of the gob! tdl j 'r Is Jibe I. n-ll.l aud p -tc-l by iisn I.
the stone- are loo-en. d in thy seti2.
and dtiM cut without 3our lieitig
jw.tiv of it?"
You are a'.wavs -o wse after the
set! lliw tlo 3011 know I wasn't go- 1
mg to taKe 1113 rings 0:1 r louarcs-t
rerulv to lind iee at fault! Hut I
thought at first the stone must have
washed out"
"So it seems 3-on did wash our
hands with the ringou?" said the tum-ing-worm.
"Yes, I did. There! And I sent tor
the plumber immediately, for I knew it
II 41kI. l lt..V4 VIlA 1. I.lI-1-.V 44.-U V-- I U
w imaii ii-ii Jii.iii nil r i iiinr n n 1-11 nmirrni
in the tirst trap; and he took up the
pipe, but it wasn't there. And he said
if he made a real job of it. and went
down to trie main something, he might
lind it there; but I thought "that would
cost more than the diamond "itcclf "
-land toie turning mors r'dprs than
tue ta ly m the lob.-ler
"Yo- d'nt say that voti really have
aec-ined h"i?''
V. c.l. 4vhat if. 1 -ave? I must
lo-e my diamond ihat my dear
grandfather gave me wln-n 1 wa
married, and that I trea-ured so, and !
endure it all in sib-nce for fear j
some li'tb hu-sy's feelings will be hurt j
.U f clings are of no cori-eqitence at 1
all! It i-n t to be reckoned to my ae
coiint that 1 wjia rcadv to ;uc her the ,
d: nnond an 1 1 love diamonds. I don't I
think there's anythiug so beautiful n
th-' v.h de world. 'J here's no other
one thing that hold- so much in o lit- j
tie; I don't mean money or money val- ,
-. It i the eon-ret.- essence of sun- :
Mine realiy. materially. unee tnai
i.lent.cal .-tone of mine. r."ns before
1 man was made, was n jibing but a I'ood
' of -imshine, marned to the wet air a-
it reach d one --pot of th earth, and a
wonderful tree sprung from that mar
riage, and :!our.shed and dowered and
fell, a great strong marvel of growth
that belong- to tho-e past aon- wl.rn
the earth it-elf was bir half crystallized
out of iu ga.se-, and that g ow- now
nowhere. I-'or th -y c.m't find run sub
stance that can ,uite produce it. Ami
I'l'i' made my diamond - by slow concen
tre t on. Or else, even if it i- not th.it, it
is the very com ores sion of tint ancient
atmosphere, almo-t all carbon, which
bung over the earth in that lir.st my-i- (
t.-ry of eh.ioa. And. at any rate, it is '
01 the pur. st physical perfection known
to-day. and of the aimple-t chemical
composition. S'o!"
"My love, how much you know! You
take m, I r--ath away. It seems to me
v. ic.scdcr to have stolen your diamond
than to steal the Koh-i-noor'"
"Iti-. Thel'ibles.iysso. Na'han talked
to King David about the ewe lamb.
Aud that wa- alTthe diamond I had. It
wo.i'd sini so to 3-011, r ally, if your
h ad clerk had sto'en it, or air. body
had stolen it but this pretty Mddred."
"1'ut, Janet, vou are alwav.s so posi
tive." "How cm -ott sa3 so? What am 1
ever po-itive about? You wouldn't
h ive me distrust the vidence of my
senses? And if eier I saw guilt on anv
face -"
"There is nothing more fallible than
the u'. iiletiee of your sense-. "
"I b g ;.o:ir pardon. I can see as far,
and h arris oiiicklv. and taste askeenlv
as any one alive. And for ou to begin
to run down 1113- eyes now- perhaps
they're not so bright as they have been
but I never thought -to hear you
Iwiilng me of growing old in this
w.13, all of a sudden" (tiying hard to
swallow her sobs) "because you're
interested in in my servant maid "
"l'or Hern en's s ike, Janet, think
what you'te aying!"
"1 do think what I am saying." she
cried then, in a fury. "And I -ay,
whatever the e idence of 1113' -eiiscs may
be. I have every evidence that you
care nothing at all for my feelings, aud
can see me robbed without lifting 3-our
toiee. and and oh. a husband ought
to love his wife, and protect, ami take
her part." And here Mrs. Jane' rose
hurriedly and pushed over her chair,
and was running from the room, t
Hut .Mr. Torrance was not to be out
done 13- airy such -leight of foot, and
had caught her in Irs arms before -he
reached the door. "And do vou think.' i
lie exclaimed, "that I don t love 3-011.
vou abominable little mass of contra
il ctioiis? lzo you suppose I won't pro
tect 3 ou with my life itself? 1)03-011
fancy tor a moment that I won't take
your pa it. when you decide what your
part is? '
"Let me go! Let
me go, ur
!
she
exelrrme I. "(Jr eNe. at any rate, let me
lind mv ban ikerch:ef!" And she strug
gle 1 for her handkerchief that the kisses '
her hit-baud gave her might not le too
salt, and pull ng it from her pocket,
something in a gr at arc and stream of
bister whirled out with the violently
wrench' d handkerchief, sailed through
the air like nothing -o much as a 'lying
rainbow, and fell at her feet.
It was the lost diamond.
Mrs. Torrenee slopped in tho midst
of her tears, blushing, disheveled,
di Miiond-dropped herself, a pretty a
sight as a lose bush in a shower, and
held back her skirts with both hands
while she looked at the great shinng
eve there before her on the carpet.
The horrid thing." she said. "The
horr.d. unwinking accusing thing! It
i calling me all sorts 01 names.
shall newr want to see it again. Onh
thin1.', if I faul denounced that poor
girl. I'm so glad I never breathed of
it to her. I remember I had on this
very gown when Mrs. Vciwm was in.
How stupid of me! Now, I'll t ke this
down to a di-Mitond broker's to da. and
Mildreds Mabel shall ha-.e her thou
sand dollars, worth of les-otis. I date
sav she'll s'ug at our parties by and by.
She" 11 be our particular prima donna.
And by thai lime I shall have improved
M ld.ed into a companion. Oh. I should
think you would il-spse such a ridicu
lous. w"ckd little wife a I am!" she
cred. turning to her husband: "You
oug.it to hae married a saint. What a
god man 3 oil are. Archy!" ,
"My dear." said Mr." Archy. "life
with any other woman who didn't
arrange these little circuses f.r my
morii'iig entertainment would be to
stale, tlat and unprofitable to endure.
I should run away from the saint, and
lai-e to the living trapeze and you."
lltirritl i'rccoU "sspotford, in ilarvcr'$
Ihtzar.
m m
FIRE-CRACKERS.
V!orr. Iliitr, or What M:itcrlit and b
lV'oiin Tlier ,rr Mailf.
Nine-tenths of the tire-crackers come
from Canton, where tins are made In
com lets hiied by Fa. sliing .v- Chow
Hing from the Government at the rate
of tii r.v cents a day. All the work i
ina'de of the pri-on-. w,.ich consist f
a resenat'on of 4' tect stuae. staketi
ofi" : 'l surror.ndiii b3 high bamboo
pal'ng-. The rau r empinvd in the
ii'auu'i--:ure of nre cracker- is mad"
of Lanbo!iini. and i- wi;'.ou d--u't
;;ui Site nlme finsjers of the convVl
l"n"-h them with a-tonisliing rapl :lv.
T.,2 p.mder i- di. erertt from sav
otitct eaue. and, despi. the r.ea- f
I :
ne-vTih l ss couallv a p.-ft.r"ui
:.s our h,'-it Wasting jjowuer. nii,a
r.a 'v for the market thev are sut to .
i Hong Kor.g. lrom when'c thev aredis- ,
I tnbnted ad over the world- In the '
3ear LSi ."i'jt(u boxes of fire-crackers .
were entered in this count-. Eah j
box contained torty packages, and each '
i):ickago from sixtv-for.r to eightv I
5 ei-fir-Versi Vrnin this some iilea nf the
numb.r of iire-orackers exploded on In-
iepeudence Pav may be gained, Los-
ton L'udgct.
. m
Of the total ara of thf United
States, foriy four per cent., or LSo-.C00
square miles is devoid to graz'h.
Chicag? ourtiaL
FOE OUIi YOUNG KEADEBS.
THE FLO .VERS' REPLIES.
-U" willow i, . I w.h I ut n a d .
A i.or . In i.ti'n,- Jn -.,. & htxK iaa.J"i
-rl I.
Thca he- wdu'- -.rut ! "hn life 1 lri-rut
or l".
Keep a t iK-vr.'til jnt," the laly say re
I"itI. "Key wjllow-wet" ntuticu; 11 like to bv.
A bright. f-.ln iMi't.-reu'i." the I tile
itmKett lxteI.
Then bs,- wiKo-ul. : Mils tnuJdon. draw
lo"the
Life' -.-oMen sanjkinc, the buttercup r
plivl.
"Hey w.l'.ow-wulv! that I muU K a clover.
A svmti. cri-tm clvvr.- u.v hr'e? wanlfa
"Tneti h-, t ..J-wolj-! r ti jouth 1
orr
Treaure all ,u ha , the aovcr e;'.
P5lKi-
-Hcr .lkw -Hal f only I uou'" Le .1 r"H-.
A e nty. rertr. ujM tiec ' trie .ii"e
ijiii dcii rlic!.
Thea 'ley wlluw-ustly: ever; little ruaidec
k now
Ho- 10 b- u nx-bin!.' the dainty ro-e rt
j.l;e.l titttft t'. PfHttyinc'-.tr, in St. 2ittha.
WAS SHE A COWARD?
iIomt .V-nule I'rntoit ll-r i:racry In the
I'ner hi I'c.'il l)n;T.
Jennie Cart -r was a very bright,
good.nutnore 1 little girl, about twelve
y-ars old. Ie;ng the only g.rl in the
fainil, -he was natirally a gr.at pet.
Indeid, her brothers had but one fault
to lind with her; but they managed to
'ive her a Teat many uncomfortable
ui-'int-nt- on account oi that one latilt.
The fact was, she was afraid of the
dark, and this her two elder brothers
couh' not under.-taud.
Little (icurge i.ever ha I anything to
say on the siiii..'ct. but. as he wa- only
two years old, he could hardly be ex
pected to h:n an opinion about the
matU-r. Hob and Max, howcer. the
oJilei boys. -,Mm !o-t an opportunity
of te:i-in"g Ji'iiu e about VIng a coward,
and of submitting her to very un
plcaant ofvleals, .n order to teach her
not lo be afra.d. As. for in-ta.ice. o'.ce
she and Hob were inadaik room, when
he suddenly rai out, holding the door
shut on the'outsi !e, so that sl.e could
not follow: and another t j.hi he and
Max coaxed ln-r down a dar. narrow
pa.:ge to a l.tt.e 10 un at the end,
wh.-rethcy le t he-, and ran away.
1'i.or Jetiu.c, in running after them,
fell and sprained her anl.ie, wh.ch was
not what they had expected. Ail this,
how cr. 011.V erved t make her more
timid, it pos-tble, and dil no goo I.
Junuie had a hard tune with the te.-us-in"
of her two brothers, which she
sometimes received with temper and
sometimes with tears.
It's as bad to be a cry-baby as a
cowaul," .-aid Max. one day, after teis
ing her until she cried.
This roused Jennie's temper.
I'm not a cry-baby," she said, in
dignation dry.ng her tear-; "and I run
no more of a coward than you. Master
Max. I let Doctor Smith pull my tooth
without a word, and you would not
een let him look at our nioitth. and
came home and cried all night wilh the
toothache."
Max looked rather -dicepish at this,
and had nothing lo -a3". lie was cry
"lad at that moment to hear his mother
call him. She had been -sitl tig at the
window, and overheard the children.
"1 wish you would not tease 3 our sis
ter so constantly, Max," .-he .said, as
ho' came in the room. "It dots no
good "
"ho is .-neb a cowardly baby," ho
said. l3 way of an excu.-e.
"She is uot a baby. You buy- tor
ment her so sin can not help cr ing.
and I am not at all sine she is such a
coward :ls 3011 imagine. Many people
who are afiald oi imaginary tilings
arc brave enough in the Sace of real
danger." was his mother's reply.
.Max was not lo be totninced, but re
frained from teasing Jennie atiy more
that day becausU his mother expressly
forbade it.
Mrs. Carter felt very sorry to have
her little daughter afraid of the dark,
because she knew it was foolish, but
she did not see any way to help it, and
hoped in time Jennie "would outgrow
it. bhe felt quite sure the Ixns could
ko no good with their tcas.ng. and put
a stop to it whenever she heard thet
Une ilav the enihiren were an r
vitcd. with their mother and lather,
take tea with their grandin- then
Of course thev were in a great hut
to set oft', aud their mother all n
them to go some time before she d
Jennie had charge of Ceorgie. and
mother gave her main charges abl
him.
"I am so afraid something w.ll hi
ne:i to him. I think he had better -J
and go with me.'' she said, anxioiisll
15nt at this time Master deorgie s
bean to pout, and tliere were -ogn-
coming tears an event always averM
if 1 ossi'ole. in the Carter fani.lv.
George's "crving tits" were at
ipt to
stubborn things.
"lJ.m't woirv. mother dear. I
take good care of htm. "said Jennie.
And when .-he made a promise. II
mo. her knew it would be kept, and
them go.
'ihev walked along the street v
happiiy. the two boys in front, and Jl
n e a lew stoo behind, with deorgie.
Suddenly ti.ey heard a great noil
and people calling. Looking back ttj
saw iv horse with a wagon attached
him coming furioiislv toward the ml
the s dewalk.
"Hun. run'" shout-d Hob, as he rJ
Max started for the steps of a hoJ
near bv.
Jen-uc could not run with her lill
brother. Mid she never thought of lei
ing h m. lu fa.t. -he newr though!
her-elt at all. she had prom -ed
take care of Ittle Ueorgie, an I
would do her be-t-
tepp;ng quickly beidnd !.m. so t
she shou d put l.iT-el: between I m
the danger, she :hr.w h r arm- cl -H
about him; ss if. j oor el . l her I
irail hotly ecrd-l save h:iu fr. m the
that was coming-
i-he si;ui her e es. J n r-- w a a
:iiag c:-ash. Si.e was c u-c
sharu ia.n somewhere aNout ',er.
then kii.w no more.
W hen she cam' to h-r? If sbel
ivin in be 1. w tu ler h .. I l l !
and a ueer. st'lTl'erllag n on- r;T
Just then her mother ejm-
beti'nlt.
"My dear, brare Htde giril'' -he said,
as she kfsss-d her.
"Was ("eorgie hurt?' Jennie a.ske T.
"-a'v
"No. au darling. You have sa".e.i
hi? life by youreo-jra- as! presence of
mind."
Jennie - niled.and there being nothing
better to on fell asleep.
Jennie was a long time recovering
from the iu juries sheliad received. The
hor-e had. ju-t as he reached the chil
dren, suddenly taken to th" .-treeL In
turuicg. the 'wagon had dashed vio
lerrtiy aga:nt tree and Icon broken.
Some portion of it had struck Jennie,
bruising ber head and breaking one
Little Georgic w-is unhanuetL The
courage of his little sister had saved
him- Hob and Max were very kind and
attentive to her during her Ulncs,. They
n-Ter called her a coward after that
Ther father had a wry . s ta'k
w.th them the day Jenii was hur. m
which he sbowil them li-w truly irae
their sister was.
Thev had nothing to .-av. for from th.
da tiger she hal faced -o bravely ihrj
lad run away. .-i..J. Ttticoii, in O'o.'ic
iJattt.
m
THE OLD DOCTOR'S STORY.
A f'thrr'. !-: W-riN """ Al.'i ,
Itrfli a IiDihI llir l Mr." i
I have a little -tory to tell yon.
t-oys." the o'd doctor -aid to the ywung
pevple the other eeninj. "tue day
a !ou' hot Jav it had 1-een. too I met
my father on the rod to town.
" 'I ivi-h you would take tbi? package
to the village for me. Jim.' he said,
hesitating
"Now. I was a boy of twelve, uot
fond of work, and wn- just out of tlu
hay-lield. wi.ero I had been at worV
since daynrt-ak. 1 wa- tirwl. du-ty
and bungn. It was two miles uiU
town. 1 wanted to get my supper am,
wash and dn - for singing hooI.
"Mv hr-t impulse HR- 10 reluse. and
to doit harshly, for I wa- wxed that hi
should a.- this of me alter my l-ng
day's work. If 1 did refu-e. h would
go'hiniielf. He was a gentle, patient
obi nun. Hut -om-. thing stopped u..
one of (ioil's go-nl angels. I think.
"Of cours-. father. I'll uko i,' 1
said, heattily, gii mg my scythe to one
of the men. lie gaw trie the package.
" 'Thank you. Jim.' he -aid. 'I a
oing mvsetf. but somehow I dou't led
er stroug to-ilay.
"He waiked wth me to the ronl that
turned o.i to the town, ami, us he bit.
put bis baud on my arm. saying r-ga n
Thank 3011. my son. You've alway
been a good loy to me. Jim.'
"I hurned into town and b.iek again.
" hen I came near the house 1 -iw
a crow d of lanu hands st the dHr
Otic if tl.em came to me. the tear- roll
ing down h.s face.
""Vour father.' he --aid. 'fell dead
jtist as he reached the hoiic. The last
words lie spoke were to you.'
"I'm an old man now, but I haw
thanked God over ami oer again in a I
the years that have passed since that
hour that those la-t words w-re.
You've alw.ivs been a good boy U,
me.' "
Vrk luificiti )ii.!nr i.ivr eJ ws sorrv
for love or kindness shown to others.
Hut there is no pang of remorse -o keen
ii- the b.tterness with which we remem
ber neglect or coldness which we haw
shovu to hwd ones who are dead.
Do not begrudge lov.ug deeds and
kind words, e-pce ally 11 thine whj
gather witn you a' out the same heart 1
In many lamdics a h:ilit of iur.'g ug.
cio-snes-. or ill-natured gibing, gia lu
alh covers the real feeling ol low that
lies deen beneath.
Ami alter all it is such a little wal
that we can go together. liiijtt
iwt'Viy.
CHARACTER.
How Coo.l anil ll'l Oii.tlitrr irw mj
Arr l)..l..nl -llir lClltt Tlmr to Hull
lor tin I'utur.-.
You know, dears, there are shop-
our large cities where one can go ail
bin- a suit of clothing all ready to
put right on and worn; but have an
you owr heard of a shop where "rea I
made elr.uaelers Were for sale?
indeed! haracter is soiueJiiug th
arow.i an I develops in even bnv ai
girl 1 ttle 113 littio every day. g.o
with their growth and .strengthens wi
their strength, until, at last, bkea cloa
or coat, it envelopes them. Iook at p ip
lie .s an honest, upright man, promt
conscientious and reliable in bus.'. s
and at home tender. atlect.onate and c
sMerate. "sow, do 3 011 suppose he w.i t
until he became a man to develop tin
oualtlies? An I did mamma gam hcrw
someness and gentle manners, lit r u
tie nee and forbearance, alter she hi
grown to womanhood? No, un divij
tltcse admirable traits were cuitn ab-d
vouth and encouraged until tin v
came tixed and peimauent qtiablJ
Miow me a boy wno likes to he abed
the morning, who is alwavs bi hmdl
breakfast, bite
J5 c r ' . . a r
V
e n r t -
r. 1 : 1 ... . "
t . . ' t" e r . -. . e .
..I-. : . rd . II- ... c
tv rg z. n.i..xe oi
1 d . 3wd 1!
better. It co-t- a much to ra -scrub
a- a ihorougLbmL W hat . .
J economy there is in raisiBgiuefe a m3
as Wiifcoo "-eiwvn.
igas are izx&l live ent- per U ue
e-ery3eir ia Cuba, ami the ingrck-..
Cub.n doe not pn: vit a iga if he ct
help it, or else pa.sts oa ;. an am ks
a.s a boot, a trunk or a agar, if vorc
must, be employed, it is not an Macon.
' mon practice to dash a daub of pah.-
fccross the lettering, prodocing1 s !
obliteri'ion. yet leaving aa itser'tKtoz
that can be derfphete-X
A LESSON FROM THE WOODS.
How Wo.lrvrl rr-t'-t'. llr Yumo
from If.
I'lin' ! "o r -t t e fil.'.l 5nilunr-?
of the alni
1 !
. --:
rl.
retlolent with rht-rry b!- m ir.d fr
runner of aianr s.ch ditr lo eow. I
wa. trolling nlong v&i o tho ! fr
quentetl road in the imnwdiai' vsciaity
of the illage. My fottr-!ooU-4 com
paniona sntin-sktnaed .oiatr. a.so
ciKte of many a h.ippy iny, with mbnjc
passion -trong. explorwd every co-
end lh;exei. rrgarUev h of a rrRt hed
i-lv aad n bee liar ''. evd b but
ga it one wbift ot that iiuK'ttnr d ,
l.ir dearer to him thvn ad the
cUr tum :b -cy bor of Al
the blest." Alrr no ahsenc wttvluS
Kre proirnct-d than u--il. n m.tl
search in the 1 rertioa 1 kd In-wl en
bin., ruwrde! him poiotm; a I r
tiled. lb chum tr J tl.e grnsl.
it rough hilloc. oTered w ith tkjt' J
cat br er ami while birrhrs. xu ot-tigoou-
to a derp nhjr wmp. left ht
tle doubt as to the nntttrv of Un mm.
while th' r!anug ee. tht qnitmnt
m-trds nd the r gid -Urn Ut e.nnll
b.ttW douU, n to iJw lew iertor p-ria
incbs that .parmted the rdttcnlel an
md from h.- iuUurn.1 pre.
While adronng the benwUtul pielnre
ami ht-itaui to interieiw, a verr larjon
hen birl lioppcKl he-vrdy up. rWanng
thu brit r with duRctiliy, onl b drop
with n sounding ;hu-l a yitf-d ir two in
advance Alnist at th name tiev-tiBd
the uutller bu? more vigrou rek
birl witn the fninil ar ringing hetb
sprang twenty f-et iot lh au nud
n.wm over the up of in btnldug
lurches, across the brook. kirtn a
wide iiiendow. nor ptoi-mjf n-r faitr
mg. untd w-itit a subLn drt and a
turn be wheeled dinrp'r ittt- a c'w ol
Hitlers nud -unmp maple. Hite a dif
ferent pecies of brd -4p;arvnllv from
his itt4-nug mate. Tue latter, nutur
ally a shv hu1 retiring birl. appeared
lt h.ive fot nil fear of nan or tiet in
lu-r nei for hr bttle L-ttndi ' el
fare. each one of whom M.ol dotibiU's
sought she'ter at once under . it pr
tecting tU a I leaf t ihe icry tirt ind -cation
of dang r. hj ll--rtmjjhlv. m-tb-el.
wre the little y..figter- lowrl
awav that, although Ihe rod" oel e-n-ta
11 tig the four troke:i 'h-!l9 were in
jda-n sight, no trace ol ihem ttid a
rath'-r eateiul arch reienl. Aud now
begau a ri's d mini ng untie, on the
I tart of that do ed parent thai mu!
e ivn to be appreciated Aruiil ind
hroitnd the t.'iinh lo sh nitihVd it i
Waddled, feither d.stor'd. Kiel -pn
in" lor ad tins world ltk- n duk tbi k
in the i!iisiii 11 of the nneiuri e 1. n
a- he fear!t-sl prii-s t. . " 1
h s finor.t 1 ! ng (r,r'- '
Alte" s,..tr-il u:tt' m I'u 1 n r. 1 I
111 compb li;l ci.i i' ,1 w!i . t
sortl-' mil! d c.Ti m h i 1 1 - t
c
-i
tny
c a
wa. th-r vj
it ?
tt- 1, -
th O'l .
aW.t St
iir. ol
W
! PERSONAL AND LITERARY.
f'eneral Sam Hobn. th pnir
G-iVt-r t of Ie4. c,,nt t hi
tlaubt-r. Mr Ne'.U Iking urt -Im-1
of a tro.-n bert-
S?m im(v .-utf-i !rtK n-g
if : ntit m-4 wrr hrl 10 wpM JrT
"li id mOn-r rrry aj or it hnHMi
b." k.v th r-ply
Hv. Joph leak is U7--f hit
ham! as farmtajr. hi fnttMH kTij- 4!
x. winu-r mmd iV- hu a trm of lo
' hundrtwl aer- in Vrrn-nt
Two djurh-T of J.h BiH. iwio
run lhliUi ior th T'e4ileitirf.
keep! 3e a votir ld. tmm&mrr at
(htnot HtlV Hk4att.
At th f pMm wfrrfvitnjr WkAmu
WtHidm lr.grahan, f 4iltrJi.
cently. iv to -hI lta! eCl w.
c-ncrntlU& h , no I h Mltji
with a pui f ! th. ' d-4.'rt
An nih.r who- t- n jMI
iN-e publlfc-l in KnjfUn ' thnt
th abjifl o- k - h ' f-
no fewer lb fifty t - n 1 him,
tiad U hMMelf to pce th . K.
lo W cnfCn. . ' le b;-
t-jr of the t.m .
-Tkr arefiirtJilir pp -
lr. r-och ny nil ft- !
ev nsn. ium! root n hl .
lrom Kurope and !- I'nt -.
'l"hey uarttally make tb- r n- -Ihe
itrret n4 ten oV-rk t
Are rrtel by ewU n.
rYevidetrt lg Wa !.
P.obrrt I olhte. ton.-JMC
eiMft thnt the Hurop. ar
frnr il bat' -ne . h r
thaiJ
he.
it-
?
f
thT make aliianc, :t :
loir, but timpK beit
o
bme in their hatred of 1
tion III a i itct. ;
fncL" he write
-Mias Vicloetii H '.'.
nuhwi cd th M
vrrMty al 0;fr4f.
yoooj; woman. . I.
Yutaitt for teral ter. -h-!nr
with Ujh ir!v '
ui hn ! t V ', t
fent.n ntty tm h
ran ehew rim. I
t
it
pr nnJ dr
ms th tb-ar '
that orr i't
JtfcOl 1
- N.tii.- ..f
.John M .
biim 1
.
pit- ii' '
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