Nebraska herald. (Plattsmouth, N.T. [Neb.]) 1865-1882, February 09, 1882, Image 1

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    The Herald.
The Herald;
ADTEBTIIIXO .KATES,
.PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY, -s
P L A T T S K 0 U T H , ; U E B R A SlA J
HIM
afAClw. aw. w. in. iu. 4 m. ijt.
tsqr... i eo i w f j oo j n $s to f oo StJ
Sqr 150 i 2 75 24 10 00 l0t
Ssqrs. 9 00 ST6 4 00 4 to IS 00 20 OS
Ucoi. e oo ioo looo is n joto 2s oo mo
KeoL. (00 130) 1600 1800 2M" 4000 M OS
leol... 15 00 18 00 30 00 2500 40 60 00 100 Of
O Vina St., One Dlock North of Main,
; , ..."r. of Fifth Street.
VST Ail Advertising Bins Dim Quarterly.
Traasto&s dvertUmente matt &e Ttt
ta Advance.
JNO. A. MACMURPHY, Editor. J
"PERSEVERANCE CONQUERS.
99
(TERMS : $2.00 a Year.
i 2i ,. Crwh&s cf any P'pir in Cas Cbcuty.
. 'rrm in Advne:
One copy, one yea ' f 2.0
')!iOC('(iV, six inonCA 1.00
One ropy, tltrce mouths, .- - .60
ry Extra Copies of tho Htiiu for sal f
J. P. Tonne, at til rost-Offle Wsws Dope
If &Ia Street.
VOLUME XVII.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1882.
NUMBER 47.
V
)
ft
1:
National Bank
OF PLATTSMOUTH. NEBRASKA. ,
John Vtzo Kit a li
K. i. Dovkv
A. W. Mt'l.AOOIILIK. .
IH . ItoUKKK
President.
Vice President.'
. Cashier.
....Assistant Cashier.
Tliit llitnk is nnw open for business at their
lew roiiiiCrmmer Main aim nixiu streets, uuu
is pre iu 1 to transact a general
BANKING BUSINESS. ;
ttn-t, Bands, Gold, Government and Loci I
Securitie , "
. .;;ot:iUT AND SOLD.
lA'posiU Received ami Interest AUouj
til on Time Certificates.
Available l;i any part of ttie t'nlted States and
Ih aliJlir; Principal Towns and Cities
of Europe.
Ai;i:.vrs"Voit the
CELEBRATE!)
In man Line and . Allan Line
Or' HY HA 51 Kit.
I'. i-.hi Hixliai U bring out their friends froir
P.k Hipe All
pi-i: If ASP. TT''K KTS FROM ITS
Through to Plattsmeulli.
WEEPING WATER BANK
or j:p.i imos.
Thin Hank is now open for the trail act ion of a
Banking Exchange Business.
IlKI'ONITM'
Ki'ceivrd. aTi.l ! nl erest allowed on Time Certl
fWtcs. R.Vl"rs
Drawn, nml :iv:ti!:ibh; in the principal towns
ami cilies if the United States and Europe.
Aji it's for the celebrated
Mnsi Line of-Steers.
Pun-iiuse yiur tickets from us, - '
Through from.Europe: Jo any
' PoM MM West.,
KEED IlKOS., 2Lf Weeping Water. Neb.
SEND fSSA US
DAVID.LAMDRSTH &SGr5. PH!LA
MONARCH BILLIARD HALL!
Next to lKrold Mock,
PLATTSMOUTH, - - - NEBRASKA,;
Fourth door east of the T. O.
Rooms Newly Fitted up With
XEW 31 OX A It CI I TABLEH.
Cigars & Tempsrano Drinks
. On hand at the counter.
It is a wide and spacious Hall ; plenty of roo'iri
for plaver J.ud seats for visitors.
P. P.. MURPHY, .
lilt Prop.
E. SAGE
Successor to Sa:r BiiOTiiMts.
DeaU-r in
STOVES,
TINWARE, SHEET IRON, ZIN
- . ' ' :o:
At tlje old Stand opposite the new HKL.
PUMPS, GAS-FITTING,
ALSO
Hakihg & Repairing Done.
P. .1. Hansev, C. E. Chassot.
Notary rublic.
H ANSEN & CHASSOT
Dealers In
(Jroeerics, Proyisioiis and
Crockery
AtlKNTS FOR Til K
CEUMAMA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.
New Yolk.
;i:i;MA KIKE 1NSURNCE COMPANY.
l'itci:Prt:-iU- -
MifWAt KKE MECilAMC-S Ml'Tl'A L,
Milwaukee, Wi.
A EST KUN HOUSE AND CATTLE INh. CO.;.
Omaha, N'eb. .
lIAMRrKC, AMERICAN STEAMSHIP PACK
ET COMPANY.
NORTH C.ERMAN. LLOYD.
STEAMSHIPS RI4TWKEN HAMRURfl,
. . MRKMEX AKD NEW VOIiK. liy
AH.
oo
I
2
t, i
3
i K J-
si i t. c
C-i C c
. C" 31
h s n
3 4"
S;
Z c a
r 3
1
o
MSI
I-
" fc
Pi
D
--
c3
Pi
3 -
5 &
4
NEW HUICK YARD.
I have now a n"w liriek-Maker from the east
First-Class Workman.
130,000 No. 1 Brick
rXf.-?rZi "fn- ttTj. C.or.i,; ;,ud x?mine
'''Iv'.ii ?Vr V'ourseiv'?. Il'tfccy
fH on a uun oS jjoes
Li head.
Wm Not He Dnlcrcoll lor a Cuaautr oiBricL
I ain u4so low ready to Contract for
all kinds of buildings and to put
up any kind of work in
JEUUV -ilARTMAN.
At ny pla-e oo W aliiujttou Avenue or at F.
S. lute's Stole ou Main Street, Plattsmouth,
Nebraska. '10
HAS01T & HAMLI1T
(From Ole P.ull, the world-renowned violinist.
I hare pleasure In testifying to the excellence
of your Cabinet Orgau, wliicli si'i'iii to me to
excel all instruments of the class I have ever
seen. Their tine quality of tone is in contrast
with that of other reed organs, ard the auto
matic swell, vox liui nan a. resonant canes, and
other recent improvements are m admirable as
to greatly Increase the artistic vaiue and use
fulness of the instrument. OLE BULL.
Oves? 125,00
Sold, and there are hundreds of orders behind.
.- notwithstanding the fact that the compa
ny have the two most extensive
factories in the world.
THE MASON & HAMLIN ORGAN CO.
make only the kkst quality of work. Much va
riety is offered in size, capacity, style of
case, elegance of finish aed orna
mentation ; but throughout
'- the whole w ill be fuund the same
thoroughly best material and workmanship.
' Easiest Pay mails.
Lowest Prices for Cash.
JAMES PETTEE,
4Mieral Ast'iit."
Plattsmouth, - Neb.
HEAD! HEAD!
M0RUIS O'liOURKE
iigair. conies to the fiont with a mag
nificent line of
Piece G-oocLs
for his winter trade.
INIr. O'Rouike is known far ami
wide as a first class
CUTTER AND .FITTER.
' Every guriiieut warranted to suit
in every particular.
Kvery one who really wants a good
fit,- calls on him. ''Go thou and do
likewise."
Shop opposite the Court House, on
lower Main St. .
Prank ITiemaU,
i MANUFACTURER OF
On Main Street, opposite Court House.
iiad to oi'de. Aiso a good line of Smoker's
Aft idea of all kinds, Tobaccos. &c, &c. 30m3
looU'liick, for f.tle as soon as burned, at
FRED. LEHNHOFF'S
BRICK YARD,
l,la((suioullt. Xtli. Otf
DKALEIt IN
SAFES, CHAIRS,
KTC, KTC, ETC.,
Of All Descriptioitf,
METALLIC BURIAL CASES
Of all sizes, ready made and sold cheap for cash
ZIY FINE HEARSE
5
: IS NOW READY FOR SERYJ.
Vv'iVU tracks to? pit patvnat;'. I
invite all to iali and examine my
LARGE STOCK OF
I3tf. Fl'ItSTl'tE AX1) COFPIX8
MIKE SCHNELLBACHER,
B LA CICSJU I TH
' " HORSF aHQElNG
' AMD
WAGON REPAIRING
, - All kind3 of
FARM IMPLEMENTS
Ideally Proviplp
Horse, Mule &' Ox Slioeing,
In short, weTI shoe anything that ha?
four feet, from a Zebra to a Giraffe.
Come and see us.
IsT JSW SI3I03P
u Filth between JLU.i UB4 Yte.f-tl?:
ustac: ti; ui-i4iiiftin titB iStf 'iJKHAU'
TIT
loy
AUKXTH WASTI) for the Best? and Fast
est Selling Pictorial Hooks and Bibles. Price
reduced tier cent. National Publishing Co,
su Lorcfii5. 6U13
iriclc Yard!
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
l. J.L.frCRKA,
IOMCEPATHIO PHYSICIAN. Office over V.
V. Mathew 's Hardware Store, Plattsmouth. Ne
braska. 871y
Ilt. j. NALISUIJUr,
DE2STTIST.
frlce over Smith, Black ifc Co's. Drug Store.
First class dentistry at reasonable prices, 23ly
i W. CLl'TTKR.
DB1TTIS T
I'l&ttMuiouth. ebraska.
OfTlee on Main Street over Solomon
.hau's Store.
& Na-
1K. II. MEADE,
PHYSICI AN and SURGEON, office In Fitz
gerald Block, which w ill be open day or night.
aitf
o. 11. io;;k, at. i.
PRACTISING PHYSICIAN. Office and Drug
Store, Main St, near Third Plattsmouth. Neb,
J illy
R. It. LIVIX(TU., 11.
l'HVSICIAN & SCBOKOS.
OFFICE HOURS, from 10 a. m.. to 2 p. m.
Examining Surgeou for U. S. Pension.
ai. a. iiAirriAi.
ATTORNEY AND SOLICITOR. Will prac
tice iu the Stale and Federal Courts. Residence
371y Plattsmouth, N kb.
JAM. M. MATIIEWH
ATTOKNHY AT LAW.
Olllce over Baker . Atwood' store, south side
of Maiu between 5th and tith streets. 21tf
WIMi . WISE.
COLZ.ECTTOJVS S&JZCIH Z, TJ .
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Real Estate. Fire
uraneeand Collection Auencv. Office in Fitz
gerald's block, Plattsmouth, Nebraska. V2iu3
R. 15. WiNUHASr. ' D, A. Camphki.i,
' . Notary Pui.
tYI.IIIA3I A CAlIIMtKLL.
ATTOUNKVS AT LAW.
Plattsmouth, - - - - NcbraskH.
tiKO. t. NniTII.
ATTORN EV AT LAW and Real Estntc Bro
ker. Special attention uiven to Collections
and all matters Rtleetin;; the title to real estate,
Ollice on 2d floor over Post Ottice. Plattsmouth.
Nebraska. ol.
I. H. irUEIXEU A CO.
LAW OFFICE Real lVtate, Fire and Life In
surance Agents, Plattsmouth, Nebraska. Col
lectors, tax -payers, Have a complete abstract
of titles. Buy and sell real estate, negotiate
plans. &c. 15yl
J A3I KS K. HORKl!tO.V
Notary Public.
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Will practice in Cass
and adjoining Counties ; gives special attention
to collections and abstracts of title. Ofilce in
Fitzgerald Block, Plattsmouth, Nebraska.
I7yl
1K. H. MILLER,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Can be found by calling at hia ofilce. South side
of Main Street, between Sixth and Seventh.
Will coutlne himself more especially to town
raetice. 42ly
PIATTSMOUTH. NEBRASKA.
Tlie Grand Central Hotel
AT SOUTH BEND, NEB.,
IBir JDJEl. JE31. KIIiaiZE,
House newly fitted up. Everything new uud
neat. Meals and Lodging at Reasona
ble rates. Call and try us.
U, F, Matthew,
DEALER IN
Hardware, Cdtlery, Nails,
Iron, Wagon Stock, .
STOVES and TIN-WARE,
Iron, Wood Stock, Pumps,
Ammunition,
FIELD tfr GARDEN SEEDS, ROPE,
AND ALL KINDS OF SHEET
IRON WORK, Kept in Stock.
Slaking and Repairing,
DONE WITH
NEATNESS & DISPATCH.
All Work Warranted.
41 tr
NEW FURNITURE STORE!
HARRIS & UNRUH,
DEALKRS IS
FURNITURE 8 COFFINS,
and all kinds of goods usually kept in a
FIKST CLASS FIRMTIBE STORE
Also, a very compile qtpvk tJ
Funeral Gooils, CoHns, Casiets, RoIjcs,
EMBLEMS, 4e.
Speolal attention given to the proper rare of
the dead, night or day. A first-class hearse and
carriages, with personal attendance whenever
desired, Chaksks always beaso.naci.k.
Sniith Side Lmrer Mrtin Strrrt,
24tl3 PLATTSMOUTH. NEB,
JOHN SHANNONS
LIVERY SALE AND FEED
Carriages always oil Hand
HEARSE FUNERALS.
I vaii( aU Qt my awomitu settled to date.
aui i shall uo no more eredlt buHiness. All old
accouuta must be settled up. and no new ones
will be made. Unless such accounts are settled
shnrtly they will be Mied.
I wish to do a strictly crvsh business 1 f ut ure
JOHN SHANNON.
Plattsmouth. Neb, -
JONES & EIKENB ARY
tvjuvitesspYs to 4oues Si Agnew.J
; Again take charge f th? Old
Brick Livery Stable
PLATTSMOUTH, - - NEBRASKA.
The old Bonner Stables. In Plattsmouth. are
now leased by Jones & Eikenbarv and 'ey
have on hand New and liandso'vn CyVUJ&a
tlons. iu the shaoe ,r ilrrTiTr'
vAuRiAQEs, nnaeiEs,
- and :
. SADDLE HORSESt
We are now prepfjed tu Weep HORSES
FOR SALE TRADEI
And will
Train and Break Colts
, On Reasonable T"ri?.
li with Pteuiy f room (that every one
knoH. liivei inourtable, we can get Fann
ers' stock and wagons, loads of hay, lie., uude
cover, w tiere they will keep dry.
Thauki:ig fill the old patrons tor their liberal'
ty, w e solicit their trade for the f ut ure, satUded
that we can accommodate them better and do
belter by them than ever before.
GOly JONES & EIKXPAV.
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
SlaU 7iretory.
C. H. VAN WYCK. U. 8. Senator, Neb. CUy.
i t vtv aiTTVhiruu it a .tni- m
E. K. VALENTINE. Representat'e. West Point.
ALBINCS nam e, oovernor, i.mcoin.
S. J. ALEXANDER, Secretary of SUte.-.
JOHN WALLICHS. Auditor, Ltncola,
ti. M. BA RTLETT. Treasurer, Lincoln. 4
W. W. JONES. Supt. Public Instruction.
A. . KENDALL. Land Commissioner. .
C. J. DILWORTH. Attorney funeral.
REV. C.C. HARRIS. ChaDlaia of Penitentiary
DR. II. P. MATTHEWSON, Supt Hospital ler
me insane.
o
Smprtmt Curt.
S. MAXWELL. Chief Justice, Fremont.
GEO. B. LAKE, Omaha.
AM ASA COBB, Lincoln.
iftconit Judicial District.
S. B. POUND, Judge, Lincoln.
f rt WATuhV U..n..lm,. 1 r V.h IMtw
W. C. 8HOWALTER, Clerk District Court,
t'lattsmouta.
o
City Directory.
JOnN O'ROURRE. Mayor.
. M. PATTERSON, Treasurer.
J. D. SIMPSON. City Clerk.
RICHARD VIVLAN. Police Jntge.
R. B. WINDHAM. City Attorney.
F. E. WHITE, Chief of Fire Dept.
S. II. RICHMOND, Cli'n Board of Health.
COUIfClLMEH.
1st Ward F. GORDER, J. M. SCH NELL
BACHKE.
2d Ward J. V. WECKBACH. J. S. HA RT
3d Ward 1). MILLER, A. DREW. (.MAN.
h Ward P. McC ALLAN. C. 8. DAWSON.
SCHOOL BOARD.
THOMAS TOLLOCK, " J. N. "WISE.
V. V. LEONARD, Wm. WINTERSTEEN.
ED. GREUSEL. ISAAC WILES,
fbttmatter3'SO. W.MARSHALL.
Counfy Directory.
W. II. NEWELL. County Treasurer.
.1 W. JENNINGS. County Clerk.
A. A. LAVERTY. County Judi:e.
R. W. HYEKS. Sherifl.
CYRUS ALTON. Sup't of Pub. Instruction. .
:. W. FAIRFIELD. County Surveyor.
P. P. GASS. Coroner.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.
ISAAC WILES. Plattsmouth Precinet.
JAM ICS CRAWFORD. South Bend Precinct.
SAM'L RICHARDbON. Alt. Pleasant PreciaeL
rallies having business with the County
Commissioners, will find them in session the
Fiist Monday and Tuesday of each month.
The Legislature meets in January, 1883.
;itl a U. S' Senator is then to be elected.
Alt IHVAL ASP UKPAKTUUR OK
I'LATTMMOIJTII MAIL.
AKVlVfS.
.yo p. iii.
u.30 a. m. s
s.oo a. in. t
3.. '10 p. in. (
11.00 a in
7.30 p. ni.
10.30 a in. I
7.30 p. m. (
11.00 a in.
ll.oo a m.
DEPARTS.
I s.oo a. in.
3.00 p. 111.
i 8.50 a. III.
) S.15 p. IB.
3.eo p. m
7.60 a. M
J 7.45 a. in.
2.00 p. m.
l.oo p. m
1.00 p. m
HOXEY
FA8TEU.X.
WESTERN.
NORTHERN.
SOUTHERN.
OMAHA.
WEEPING WATER.
r ACTORV VI UJ5.
Dee. 17, KUtI
KATES C1IAKUEO FOB
ORDERS.
On orders not exceeding 1 15 - -Over
$15 and not exceeding $30- -"
$30 $40 -
" $40 " $50 -
10 cent
is cents
20 cent
23 cents
A single Money Order may
include any
dollars, but
amount frem one cent to fifty
must not contain a fractional part of a cent.
RATES FOR POSTAGE.
1st class laatter (letters) 3 cents per H ounce.
9d " " (Publisher's rates) Sets per lb.
3d " (Transient Newspapers and
books come under this class) 1 - cent per
each 2 ounces.
4th class (merchandise) 1 cent per ounce.
J. W. Marshall. P. M.
B. & M. R. R. Time Table.
Taking Bfect Nov. 6, 1881.
FOR OMAHA FROM PLATTSMOUTH.
leaves l :45 a. m. Arrives 4 :25 a. ta.
2 :43 p. in. " 4 :15 p. ra.
8 :20 a. in. ' 9 :40 a. ni.
FROM OMAHA FOR PLATTSMOUTH.
Leaves 8 :60 a. m. Arrives 10 :05 a. m.
" 7;00p. m. :10 p.m.
' 6 -MO p. iu. " 7 :3o p. DJ.
FOR THE WEST.
Leaves Plattsmouth 9 :20 a. in. Arrives Lin
coln, H :55 a. m. ; Arrives Kearney, 7: 40 p. m.
Leaves 6 :55 p. ra ; arrives Lincoln tOp.m,
Freight leaves at 9 :20 a. m. and at S :15 p. m.
Arrive at Lincoln at 4 : 53 p. in. and 2 :0 a. in.
FROM THE WEST.
Leaves Kearney. 6 :30 a. la. Leaves Lincoln,
1 .00 p. m. Arrives Plattsmouth. 3 -JO p. m
Leaves Lincoln 7 a, ru ; arrives Piatteinoutii
9 mo a. 111.
Freight leaves Lincoln j,t la M p. m. and 9 :30
p. in. Arrives at PUitsmouth at 5 ;33 p. in. and
2:50 a.m.,
GOING EAST.
Passenger trains leave Plattsmouth at 7 00 a.
ni.. 9 eo a. ni., 3 40 p. 111. and arrive at Pacine
Junction at 7 25 a. ru 9 SM) a. ut. and 4 10 p. m.
FROM THE EAST.
Paenger trains leave Pacific Junction at S 35
a. in. ,6 :'M p. ni., 10 a. m. and arrive at Platts
mouth at 8 55 a. 111., 6 0 x. m. and 10 40 a. m.
It. V. R. R. Time Table.
Taking Eject Sunday, November 6, 1881,
WEST.
5 :15pm
6 :15
8 iW
:h8
9 :lo
10 -.15
10 um
11 :4o
li :10pm
.1 1 :Mi
1 : -."0
2 :-20
S:!l
i :I0
: .0
STATIONS.
lLAS-yGtt,
BLUE HILL
COWLES.
AM BOY
RED CLOUD.
INAVALE.
RIVERTON.
FRANKLIN.
BLOOMI NGTON.
NAPONEE
KEPUBUCAJt
ALMA
ORLEANS
OXFORD
ARAPAHOE
kast.
9 .50pm
8:55
8 :15
7
6 :23
6 :00
4 :30
4 :O0
2 :50
2:45
I its
ia -.20
It :55aui
II za
11 :23
10 ?M
9 :15
PLEASE REMEMBER
thut the Cheapest and Best Placu ta W
Staple aM Faocy Groceries
AJiO
First-Class Dry Goods,
IS AT TH I
OLD RELIABLE STORE
OF
Cor. Ma'm i'.4 Third St'. Plattsmouth.
??Tsj k alwaps fresh and new. and prices
always r the bottom. Call and convince your,
selves, lotf
THE!
B.&M.R.R. HOUSE,
JNO. BOBS & SOH, Pnp'rs,
N. W. CORNER J4AN AN SECOND STU8,
Si4f A M. Paaaenger Depot,
ll,TTSMOl'TII, KEDRA8KA.
Newly Kill tied and furnlvhed throughout. Af
foniiiiK au excellent view of the R. R. Bridge,
It is conveniently located, especially for the.
traveling public
The tables always supplied wlUvta best of
the season.
n connection with the house. Lunch ba&ket
filled at all hours. Terms reasonable. ttf
STRE1GUT & MILIEU
Harness Manufacturers,
SADDLES
BRIDLES
COLLARS.
and all kinds of harness stoek.t QuMtantly on
Itcpdirlng of all Kinds !
T- EA TL Y DONE cs SHORT NOTICE
HEW HARNESS I
I'ltNZD OUT IN SHORT Q&PER
And Satisfaction Qvtxanteed.
tar-Remember pjaie Opposite Henrj
Boeck's FvjivMe tjre, ou Lower Main Street,
mm
For the Cure of Coughs, Colds,
Hoarseness, Croup, Asthma, Bron
chitis,Whooping Cough, Incipient
Consumption and for the relief of
consumptive persons in advanced
stages of the Disease. For Sale
by all Druggists Price, 25 cents.
Lara.
Iu the open door et a farmhouse gray.
Sat a poor little maiden brown.
At the cloning hour of a summer day
Watching the sun go down.
It made a picture dazzling and bright.
As it lit up the old stone mill
And bathed iu a flood of golden light.
The bankers fine house, on the bill.
The bankers daughter was riding by
A young, and dathing bride.
Aud rudely laughing and scornfully
She turned to the friend at her side.
This must be "Noahs Ark" eried she
Aud that queer little maiden brown.
Looks quite as ancient it seems to me,
Iu her comical, old fashioned gown.
Poor Lura ! wounded as never before
In shame hung her pretty head
And swiftly ran from the open door ;
As these cruel words were said, a
But Fortuue's wheel was turning away
And a very strange prank it played.
For the bankers daughter went down one
day
And up came the little brown maid.
Beloved and loving, a happy wife,
"The bankers flue house" is her own
While bis daughter liveth a dreary life
In the farmhouse widowed and lone.
BUILDING RECORD OF 1881.
We present this week our annual
building record for the past year, and
wish to state that it is not published
as a review of business, at this time,
nor yet as puffs for any one's business.
It is simply, as nearly as possible, a
correct statement of the improvements
of the past year, published as a record.
which we have kept for several years
now. The files of the Herald, we
hope, will be here long after we leave,
and in them historians can trace the
growth of Plattsmouth from year to
year. We make these few remarks to
prevent the usual carping, fault-find
ing and annoyance occasioned by what
are called "annual reviews," this man
being left out, and that man too much
or not enough, and so on.
This is simply a matter of our own;
nobody pays for it ; nobody has been
asked to take an extra copy of the pa
per, and it is for our own and others
information in the future. Such arti
cles are never absolutely correct, but
they serve to aid and fix dates in the
urnd, aud become of service in a hun
dred ways in the years to come.
The B. & M. It. R. improvements
were given so fully in the review just
after the Board of Trade banquet that
we make a mere summary of the num
ber of buildings and an approximation
of the amount at this time.
There are also some fifteen or twen
ty small houses and additions west of
town in the additions there, the details
of which it is impossible to get, being
mostly built by the owners, aud few
speaking English. The sum total
makes a very fa'.r showing for 1881,
which, however, as appearances indi
cate, will be more than equaled in 1882.
The B. & M. have built n 1SS1, in
addition to the already extensive works
here the following new buildings and
improvements, vis.:
A blacksmith shop, of brick 200 feet
loiif and G5 feet wide; a wood working
shop of brick 120x60 with engine room.
Roundhouse, No. 3, of 10 stalls; a
building 80x40 for storage, and a, dry
house 20x70. Another round house,
No. S, 125x50 and general store house,
50x175 feet. An engine room, prepa
rations for Water Works, and a huge
oil house and store room are yet under
way.
These improvements, not inelnded
in the business record of the city, can
be estimated as each individual
chooses. Their real value will sever
be ebtained from the Kailroad officials
T.1 their absolute value to Platts
mouth, cannot be computed in dollars
and cents. .
Dr. Jno. Black, brick block on
the south west corner of Sixth and
Main streets ; 48 feet wide and 60
feet long, two stories high. The cor
ner room 35x44,' with a corner entrance
will be completed in a few days and
occupied by the Bank of Cass County
of which Dr. Jno, Black is President
The store-reom 25x80. facing on 6th
street with a plate glass front, will
be occupied by Joseph M. Roberts, as a
Drug Store. " ' .
The Store-room facing on Main
street, west of the Bank. 24x36, will
be occupied by Mrs. J. F. Johnson and
Miss Sweney, for their Millinery es
tablishment; the same parties will like
wise occupy a suite ef four rooms in
the secosd story ever their store. The
upsUlrs rooms, of which there will be
1 seven or nine, are all engaged for offi
ces, &c. The - basement rooms are
likewise engaged for restaurant pur
poses. The building will be lighted with
gass, manufactured on the premises, a
machine to run fifty burners is now
being put up.
The Main and Sixth street fronts
are of St. Louis, pressed brick, and the
stone caps and sills and other stone
work was likewise shipped from St.
Louis, also the doors and sash; the
plate glass is of English Manafacture
and was purchased of a Chicago firm,
by the Doctor himself. Two of the
plates are the largest ever brought to
Plattsmouth, being 78x132 inches.
The entire cost of the ground, build
ing, vault, gas machines, counters,
shelving, Ac, will be 812,000.
- Joining the above, on Sixth street, is
the M. E. Church block, containing
two store-rooms, 22x60 feet, finished as
above with plate glass and pressed
brick; they will be occupied by Har
ris & Unruh, as a Furniture Store,
and Baker & Atwood, as a Dry Goods
Store. They cost about $7000.
Altogether, the block is the finest in
the city and a credit to the M. E.
Church and Doctor Black, the whole
costing about $19,000.
JOHNSSN BROS., CONTRACTORS.
Win. Fry, frame 14x24 one story, on
Washington avenue, between 9th and
10th streets; cost 8250.00.
U. V. Mathews, two stories with
brick basement, 30x30 with two large
wings, corner Vine and 4th streets;
cost $2,000.
A. Wright, addition to residence.
corner 8th aud Elm streets; cost $250.
Mrs. I. Campbell, frame dwelling,
one story and a half 20x28, on Oak
between 7th and 8th streets; $900.
John Calhoun, one story frame
dwelling 14x24, wing 12x14 on Timber
street; $540.
J. W. Johnson, lj-story frame resi
dence. Vine bet. 4th and 5th. 20x30;
$1,000.
A. Wright, one story frame dwelling
14x24, with wing 12x14; cost 3550; al
so one story frame 14x24 with wing 12
xl4 and out houses, on Walnut, be
tween 7th and 8th streets; cost $560.
BATES A KOHNKE, CONTRACTORS.
Office of Dr. Schildkneeht, on coraer
7th and Main streets, 18x22; cost $400.
J. Y. Weckbacb, addition to house.
corner llth and Oak streets, -18x20;
$300.
F. R. Guthmann, addition to house,
corner 3d and Marble streets 14x16;
cost $150.
II. Smith, frame dwelling, 18x30;
cost $1200
F. R. Guthmann, addition to Pacific
house, corner 3d and Marble, 14x16;
cost $75.
Christ Kohnke, frame dweling with
brick basement, on Vine between 5th
and 6th streets, 18x30; cost $800.
F. R. Guthmann, improvements on
building, corner Main and 3d streets;
cost $290.
NICnOLS & SON, CONTRACTORS.
Henry Martin, addition to residence,
corner Granite and 4th streets, story
and a halt, 14x18; cost $400.
Rob't Ballance, transforming old
Catholic church into a dwelling house
corner 4th and Granite streets, two
story brick, 20x30; cost $700.
J. G. Ritchie, frame residence one
story and a half. 26x30, on Vine be
tween 12th and 13th ; cost $900. Also
a one story frame, residence, on Gold
street, between 9th and 10th, 24x30;
cost $600.
Harry Kaeller, frame dwelling, one
story, corner 8th and Maible. 22x14;
cost $300.
Geo. Fronk, lj-story brick dwelling
corner 12th and Courtland. 16x22; cost
$200.
Jesse Overlander, lj-story frame
residence, corner 6th and Rock, 16x26,
with ell 19x16 ; cost $900.
J. V. Weckbacb. brick store building
south side Main near 3d, 23x109, plate
glass front, cost $7,000; Geo II. Thomp
son, architect.
Alva Drew, brick store, south side
Main near 3d, 2 stories, 22xS0, plate
glass front; cost $4,500.
W. R. Carter. l-story brick dwell
ing. Marble between. 6th and 7th, 16x22
with wing 6x16 ; cost $750.
Wm. Lind&ey, 1-stery frame . dwell
ing, coiner llth and Pearl, 16x24; cost
$159.
E. Messier, l-story frame dwelling
Second St., - bet. Marble and Rock, 20x
26; cost $800.
PORTER Jfc COLEMAN, CONTRACTORS.
F. R. Guthmann and Oswald Guth
mann, the Perkins house, three story
brick building, containing 63 rooms,
parlors, &c, corner 3d and Main
stieets: cost 20.000. The Perkins
house was built in 18S0 and 1881.
C. H. Parmele brick dwelling house
one and a half stories, eight rooms, on
Vine street between 4th and 5th ; cost
$800.
Mrs. Fred Stadelman, frame dwell
ing, one and a half stories, eight rooms,
on Vine street between 5th and 6th
streets: cost $1,800.
D. J. PORTER, CONTRACTOR.
'A. W. Crites. one brick residence.
one story, on Marble street 28x30, four
rooms ; cost $900.
Mayor O'Rourke, frame residence,
two stories with brick basement 30x30
ten rooms, bath room, store room, &c,
cost $4,000.
Catholic church, a brick building on
6th between Oar and Locust, 20x40,
for school purposes; cost $1,000.
Ben Uemple, two story frame dwell
ing house, with brick and stone base
ment, 18x26 ; cost $1,200.
T. S. C. Dabb, one story frame res
idence, 16x24, built by himself; cost
$150.
F. A. BATES, CONTRACTOR.
Peter Rauen, brick, one story, 23x28 ;
cost $900.
J. II. Buttery, barn 18x26, 14 feet
high ; cost 300.
S. S. Billings, five Platte Valley
houses, 16x20, one story frame; cost
$200 each.
O. H. THOMPSON, CONTRACTOR.
Rasgorsheck Bros., one store build
ing, brick, three stories high, 22x60;
1st story, 10 feet and clear, 2d, 14 feet
and clear, 3d, 12 feet and clear, furnish
ed with French Plate Glass, pressed
brick and cut stone, corner of Main
and 5th streets; cost $6,000.
J. P. Young, one frame residence,
16x20, two stories high; cost $800.
Frauk Stewart, one frame residence,
two stories high, 18x26, on 3d street;
cost $1,000.
W. H. PICKENS, CONTRACTOR.
Capt. II. E. Palmer, one frame res
idence, story and a half high, 18x28
with kitchen 10x18, in block 39; cost
$1,700.
F. Gayle, frame residence, one story
high, 22x38, in block 62 ; cost $S00.JA1
so in block 65. one frame residence,
18x38, with kitchen, 12x14, two story;
cost $1,306.
Geo. S. Smith, addition on residence,
18x20; cost $500.
W. II. Pickins, one frame residence,
two stories high, 18x24, with brick
basement ; cost $S00.
Mrs. Levings, one frame residence,
two stories high, 20x28, with two ells
16x22, and 14x16; cost $1,700.
P.P. Gass, addition on residence;
cost $150.
W. II. Newell, two additions on
dwelling house,' in Young & Hayes ad
dition, 1Sx20 and 12x16, one story;
cost $500.
Mrs. McCrea, addition en residence,
16x20; cost $500.
Geo. W. Suttell, one story frame
residence, 14x24, on block 122; cost
$150.
Jones & Eikenbary, one frame barn,
16x80, joining Bonner stables; cost
$300.
MORRISSEY BROTHERS ELEVATOR.
Steam Elevator, size of main build
ing 20x104, size of engine and boiler
house 20x40, height of maiu building
60 feet, capacity for handling 40 cars
per day. Barnard & Lea's corn shelter
and cleaner, capacity 1100 bushels corn
per hour; 3 of Barnard & Lea's Du
plex separators, capacity 2009 bushel
of wheat per hour; Fairbank 60,000
pounds track scales, double elevator
tracks. Six stands of elevators, each
60 feet high, three large double im
proved fanning mills. Boiler 70 horse
power, new engine, Erie make, 50
horse power. The total cost $17,500.
Thomas Marsland, two story frame
residence, brick basement, on Sixth &
Granite streets, 28x34, square roof
with four gables and portico on north,
and west sides; cost $2,000; Geo. II
Thompson, Architect and James Hodg
ert, builder.
J. C. Cummins, a fine two story
frame residence, with stone and brick
basement, on corner of Pearl and Ninth
streets, 30x38, with fifteen rooms, cis
tern, well, &c, complete; cost $3,500;
W. J. O'Brian, builder.
E. G. Dovey & Sons, a brick addi
tion to store building, on Main street,
two stories high 22x35 feet, brick and
iron vault, fire-proof; Zeke Kennedy &
D. E. Babbington builders; cost $1,700.
J. R. Ross, corner Pearl and 9th
frame residence, 16x28 with ell 14x22
one story ; cost $900. Also one frame
residence on Pearl street, block 40, I6x
23, four rooms ; cost $425.
Mrs. Hattie McAuley, en Pearl
street, block 40, 16x26, addition 10x14 ;
cost $300.
Mr. Beckner, addition to house, on
10th street. 14x14, cost $125, also cot
tage, corner 10th and Gold strtets, 22x
14, with ell 9x16; cost $325.
Mr. Brainard, frame residence, two
stories high ; cost about $500.
John Richardson, frame house one
sUry, 16x24 ; cost $350. J. Mapes and
Beckner, builders.
J. Richardson, one and a half frame
residence. 16x26 with ell; cost $450,
Jno. RoVbins. builder.
J. W. Love, two cottages, one 20x24
sind one 18x30, in southwestern part of
town, the two cost about $1,500.
G. E. Pronger, addition to residence.
frame 18x24, on Main street, between
6th and 7th; $500. Also frame barn,
18x20, same place.
Leonard Farnuff, one frame resi
dence. 8torv and a half high, with
brick basement, 18x24 in Duke's ad
dition; cost $1,000. G. E. Pronger
builder.
Mrs. Kennedy, a brick residence one
and a half stories high, 18x22. on cor
ner of 9th and Locust streets; cost
$S0O. Peterson & Davis builders.
Morrisey Brothers, two story frame
residence, with brick basement, eight
rooms ; cost $800.
Janda Brothers, two story frame
dwelling, with brick basements, cor
ner Main and 14th streets; cost $500
Ed. Oliver, brick residence, two
stories, on 9th street between Vine
and Oak; cost 2,000. Zeke Kennedy
builder.
A. Schlegel. addition to residence,
corner 4th and Locust; cost $300.
Lu Golding, brick store building, tn
Mam street, two stories high, 22x100,
second story CO feet long; cost $7000,
Rauen & Co. builders.
L. D. Bennett, addition on residence
on Elm street' between 9th and 10th ;
cost $300.
C. F. Chittenden, rebuilding resi
dence on Vine street, with five rooms,
two stories high; cost $800.
G. S. Smith. 2-story frame tenement
house with brick foundation, Oak, bet.
7th aud 8th, 26x20 ; cost $500.
W. H. Newell, two wings to resi
dence, corner Rock and llth, 12x20 and
12x10; cost $600.
F. D. Lshnhoff, two story frame
dwelling with brick basement, corner
Rock and Fourteenth strests, Jerry
Hartman, contractor; cost 8900.
Wm. Wood, addition to residence,
corner Sixth and Courtland streets;
cost $400.
Mrs. Brantner, addition to residence
corner of Ninth and Hickory streets;
cost $400.
B. I O'Neil, addition to dwelling
house corner Elm and Seventh streets;
$300.
August Stohlmau, addition to resi
dence on Washington Avenue; cost
$150.
A Monkey's Babies.
About six months ago, an admiring
friend of Louis Seidler. tlio South-side
saloonist, presented liim with a pair of
Mannosette monkeys. They nre strange
looking animals, and have always at
tracted attention. Tboy are natives of
brazil, and are a cross between a
monkey and a squirrel, having the color
and fur of tlio latter and the faco of the
former, in sizo they arcs between a small
monkey ond a large squirrel. They
are very intelligent and know Mr. S.
very well. Recently the female gave
birth to two little ones, ono of which
died, but the other is alivo aud healthy.
The mother cried bitterly for a while
over the dead one, but soon reconciled
herself with the other. It is about tho
size of a mouse, and is thepctandprido
of tho mole. The female holds it and
suckles it as a mother would a babe.
but as soon as the little one is satisfied
the male takes it, and with a wonderful
expression of wisdom and dignity,
marches up and down the cage in a
manner that causes one .to luugh in
spite of himself. Mliecling Inteaigen-
cer.
A rnilroad man met with a terrible
accident the other evening He had
just emptied one schooner of beer, and
was in the act of reaching for another
when his "wife appeared unexpectedly
upon the scene. He was caugui
between tho bumpers with the usual re
sult. TTiiLn ctunl sVinfra Viava harm intro
duced in England in the construction
of large ocean steamers. The weight
is thereby reduced, while tho strength
but slightly diminished.
Where Famines Occur.
It is a great help to tho study of fam
ines l observe that they occur almost
invariably in tbinlj'-settled countries, or
in countries where the whole people are
employed in producing food. Ireland
and India belong to tho latter class;
Swedon. Persia and Asia Minor to the
former. S-vcn Mr ago both Asia
Minor and Northern Sweden were en
during the horror.' of famine. Both
are thinly-settled countries, the former
having less than u third of the popula
tion it supported in Roman times. In
1874 children were sold by their parents
into perpetual slavery, partly to save
them from a slow and painful death,
and partly to secure a scanty supply of
food for the reinainiug members of the
household. Whole villages were do
populated, and regions abandoned to
tho wilderness. Swedish Delecarlia
was nearly a ill off. the difference be
ing duo to better government and l.rgo
: ssistanco from the neighboring coun
tries aud provinces. At this moment
both countries nre again facing tho
sam! terrible experience, and crying
f r bread to tlio re-t of the world. On
Malthusian principles, they should bo
enjoying an exceptional prosperity;
but the experience of mankind, some
how, will continually insist on showing
weaknesses in Malthus. The Ameri
can. Rev. John Hall believes that news
paper wri'crn. if given a text, could
often write a better sermon than some
ministers. '
Eailw&y Bales in Cassia.
The Russian ministerof ways of com
munication h& issued a series of regu
lations for the settlement of disputes
between passengers on railroad trains
in regard to the right to close or open
the windows. The rules are fire in
number, of which the first lays down
the law that all windows are to be kept
closed in winter time while the carriage
is being warmed. The second modifies
this during the rest of the year, passen
gers having tho right thea to demand
the opening of the windows if the tem-
feraluro is not lower than &5 degrees
ahrunlieit. When this temperature is
attained the stoves must be lighted and
the windows kept hermetically closed.
Rule 3 states that on the mercury ris
ing abovo 55 degrees Fahrenheit, all
the windows in tho carriage may bo
opened, subject, however, to the "unan
imous approval of all the passengers
presenL" Should there "be a "side
wind" all the windows on the wind
ward sido are. by rule 4, to be kept
closed, and a demand ntay be made for
the general opening of the windows on
the other side of the carriage. Finally,
by rule 5, the minister orders that, in
all quarrels between passengers regard
ing carriage windows, tho head guard
is to ba applied to, and his decision U
to be binding on all concerned.
Whalebone
The Dutch formerly paid $3,500 a
ton for whalebone, but it has not
brought that since 1763. In 1814 it
brought $450; in 1834. $545; and in
1844 it varied from $1,080 for Southern
to $1,550 for Northern bone. Inven
tive genius is trying bard to find a sub
stitute for whalebone, and has met with
some success. Buffalo-horn gives sat
isfaction, as there is quite a similarity
between them. The horns aro cut in
to strips, which are straightened for
the dressmaker. Compressed cane
does not answer the purpose as wolL
The best whale bone is from the Green
land whale, from one of which two
thousand to three thousand pounds aro
often taken. Whalebone hats aud rib
bons have just come in. The former
are beautiful and verv comfortable.