Nebraska herald. (Plattsmouth, N.T. [Neb.]) 1865-1882, September 09, 1880, Image 1

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    The Herald,
A I V K II T I H I X G RATES.
si'Acit 1 1 w. I 2 w. 3 w. 1 m.l 3 m. fl iu. 1 yf.
r'C!:!.isnr! i:vi:ky Thursday,
AT
PLATTSLI0UT1I, NEBRASKA.
1 tqr...
2 qn
3crs.
M col.
H col..
1 col...
$1 oo
1 50
200
600
00
15 00
$i no
2 00
2 75
8 00
1200
1800
$2 00
2 75
4 00
10 00
1500
20 00
( 2 V)
3 25
4 75
1200
IS 00
2500
5 00
6 60
8 00
2000
1100 312 04
10 00
13(
14 04
20 04
3.1 00
00 00
100 04
28 00
25 40 04
4000
60O0I
Oi' Vina St., 0i-9 D!o-!i North of Main,
Cor. of F'ftli Street.
t&" All Advertising Bills Due Quarterly.
t37 Transient Advcrtlsmcnts must be Fal'
In Advance.
JNO. A. MACMURPHY, Editor. J
66
PERSEVERANCE CONQUERS.
(TERMS: $2.00 a Year.
Li'-st i sr.j hp is Orusty.
Terms in Ailvane:
f-Extra Copies of the Herald for sale by
J. P. Young, at the Post-om.ee News Depot,
Main Street.
One COfy. or. yes?-
Oiiecojiv. si
Oiie ct'jiy, t'uvo uioiiilu
. -"0
."l.'iO
. ..'0
YOLTTME XVI. V
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 18S0.
JSTUMBER 25.
The Herald.
NEBRASKA
1?
I
National Bank
OF i'l.ATTS.UOl Tff. NEBRASKA,
Ii I'll 7.CK1! II. I ..
K. i. IimVKV,
A. V. M"'. M l.MI.IN..
I-.-, i! ) Kiti'r.uK
President.
Vice President.
Cashier.
...Assistant Cashier.
: ': iri.iak i i nnw flnOi for l)iiHin,-- ;a their
n .. ti;i. corner-Maim 'and Sixth st rcfts, and
is i" . i:uvii to ira'isaet a t;etH-ral
BANKING BUSINESS.
-t , Bonu'i, ColJ, Governn ent and Local
Securities
KOKCUT AND SOI.l).
In . :.(' t.i lit : ' I awl Interest Alhuo-
i:f on Tir.ir Ctrttjffft'is.
V' . . '. !e in any part i.f tlio X'niteil State ami
! .ill the r'.iii' ii::;! Towns Cities
f l'lii'.jn-.
.i;i:.T.s'ro:i Tias:
CELEBirATED
KHAN LlrlE AND ALLAN LlN
;:' kti'Aihi'.rk.
f i : vtliui;4 to brini; out their friend.? from
i-l i.TiiAsi: tk'K i: rs fkom ts
T : r ii z Ii to I' I a 1 1 n i o n t h .
THArie MARK i'!:- Ore.'.t Eu-TflAaE MARX
Ulisii Keinetlv ; jr-.
Weakness,
Spermatorrhea-
Ns and all diseas- ?S
iV3K. -" that l'd!..vr
iViXl2k- as a seMUvnec;$3i
of Self Alms.- : '
EElEiu TASINI.
n Loss of AFTER TAIIHS.
Memory, t'nivci sal I.assit ii ! l'ain in Hie hack
1 Uiiiie- ; of Vision, riematuie did Ae, ami
any other diseases that lend to insanity or
JfV'smihii! iiin. and a l'rt in -it nre (Jrave.
i'i.il ai t iciiiai s in our pamphlet, which
w e '!, -ii'.' to semi free !y mail to every one.
i - ' l'lio SjM-cil'u- Medi.-inc is sold l.y all uniir-t-
; rt wr a-ka;:e. or six .ack:tires for
.r w in-sent five ly mail on iveeijit of the
niatte-. Ivy Hihliessi:ii
Tin-: ;i; vy Mr:i):riNi: nx.
Mkciiamc-' I'.i.o;-ic. 1)Ki ;:.it. Mii st.
in I'lat :sMoii:h ii f I eve t v . here, by
all i. e .:-'i-ts.
tho
rarest ar.il Kcst Sledicine ever made5
A vniMnnt:on ft HniH. Itoolia, McnilrnLes
P l.vo tti'Ih it if s i-t all other JJiflVrs makes tJie (7-rvat-
rs!ool i'uriuer. Liver IZecrulntvr, aiiu JLiic
....I ll..,'lh 1.'.. -t . ...f A m.i '. t .... .. I.
fj No ilioase or 111 lien! tj can rwil '.y lino prist h
W wiir re Hop Bittern aro Ujtd, vailod. aaa jtrictt j
Ihej gle new lire and ftcor to Ci tfted and Infirm, a
M To nil vhoso emplojuientti cau irrepiilnnty nf y
'hl'riwpis or tonii.iry organs, or wlto rrqmr- cncl
lt tizer. T-.nio ori'l mil 1 BtimuLoiit, ilup iuitcnij
iru iaviUooblo without Intoxivutlnir. a
Ko mntter what Tonr f LClint?s or trrmptomft aro- a
what tlio (liieno or uUtuent is, use" Hon Hut. rs 3
inn t wait uni il yuti are sick, but if you only teol"
;kii i or iiii.seraol'. 11-0 llio i:mcrs at oucOw 1C maj
save your lil'e. It liua saveU hundrutt.-i.
)r00 will he p.-iij f era case theririn nnt rnre or
hi lo not suifernor U-t your friendi gutter, but
u.so and ur'O them to use ilop Litters.
Remember IIrpI!ittrrsisno vile, dminred, drunk
en ni'stnim, reit the tiiret nnd lJ st Ji ilieim c r
:ua!e; the lnvplM i'rlend nl Ilnne, and
iu xvemou or lamilj should Lo witaout Uii-iii.
Vet eomc tfc! luj. IX J8ft '
Hop Corcn CTee Ls tlie Fleetest, safest and best.
Ask ChdilrLU.
' Th TTor A for Ftoruaoh, Liverand Kidnrvls nt.
riur to ail otiicm. Cures hy atjsorptiou. Aak dru'4.
D. L f IsanntSfKilatenridirTOFii'tlblerTirefordrtink
eiiuetu, use ot opium, tobacco and narcotics
oM by Jru-Uu. IK-p Bittm Mfg. Co. Uuchcsttr, N.Y.
Stint f.T Circnlar.
mm
It ts trip best r.lood PnriHer. and stimulntrs
ev-ry futietion to more healthful uctlou, &uu 13
liiiis a tieneiii in nil oiseasex.
In elimination the impurities or the blond, the
natural and 111 sary result is ttie eurool'Seror-
nlouH ninl oilier skin Kruptiotis :ud Hiseases,
iueliidiiiR C'aneers, I'leen mid other Sori-s.
Dyspei.-ev. Weakness of tliest.niiiicli.fonsti
pntion, Iiz.incss, (ieneral LHlnlity, etc., nre
lured by the S;f- ltittcis. It is uiiLLjualud
us nu aipetizer uu.l regular totne.
It is a meilieine vvhi.-h should Ik in every fam
ily, ami which, wherever used, will save the
pay incut of many doctors' bills.
Uott'.es of two sizes; prices, 50 cents and $1.00.
Warners
Jointu
re soIl
fay IJrHKfjisiS
ami Dealers
in Iolieiiic
It:
t'vorjvlic-re.
tli s.i,d for l'amphlet
and TchUinoniitls.
Cathartic Pills
C is:' !! 1h; flioieost catliartic principles
n in. ilii in.', in tiroi'cn-tK'iis aecuraTely ait
justeii t si'iiiiv activity, certainty, anl
uiiifiiriuity d elTe t. They arc the" result
of vi ars i.f cai tla! stmly and praetieal ex-
jic)-n,:cnf. n i.l an- tuo t::cst t-lTet'tual rem.
flv -ytt ("u.-cover.-i! km' iliseases, caused hv
der:i.!:'ii':in '.it of t' e M ii::ich. Jiver, and
I'o-.vi !s, -.vi.irh r j 1 1: rt ti inj)t and efTectual
tr'-:sf :n-nts Avrn't I'll. I. s p.re siwially ap-
tutca' le t; tl ;s ci.v-s of insrases. J hev act
directly o.i ill' digestive c.'-.d n&siinilative
iiroci-.s.'-es. ;;:itl n stovi' regular licaltliv ac-
li.a. Their extensive t-se hy hysiciaii3 in
tin i v i ii'i-ii-e. an l 1'V a'.I cii!ized nations.
Ls ci: cf tii. many pivmfs f their value as
a sa.'i-, si:r.-. ;ud i-ilcetly rdiahle purgative
ji-.i I'l-i'ie. i'.i in;' o!n!Run!ed cf the ecu.
ci nti-aJoii virtin-n vt purely vegetal 1 snh.
pfu!:. s. tiny are Hsi!ivt!y free from -alo-ii'ei.
tin v i!!iuii 'its; irotwrtie.s, and can he
io::i.:ii;'.i-rel tu cljildrcii with jt rfcLt safetv
A-.iat's T'ti i s are an c.Tectual euro for
C'c.ii ;;(.;, Tj.(;, ,.- Cost i venoss, Indifres
t'o. . iy; sia, i.tr-s ;f Appetite,
1 oi l S:ci;.:'cii and lirtatii, Ii..iness,
lie: ('.ociic. Loss f Miuory, Nuiiibness,
1 : i ::i:'.ii!i' , .f.ttiiidice. ICiietttiiat ism,
..- . imiis n;i-t Diseases. Iropsy.
' ' '"is Vio!-:iis, cttrali;ia, 'olic,
t j-. ;. i p ft-! t ix-ji. Ij sent cry, Ootit,
ii.. i.isor.ii-rs ot tue IJver, and all
tt... r ilisiit.. r. :'!. iny from a disordered
M;e.- ci t.i-- l:;. stive r.pj araillS.
Vs n Dinner Fil: they have no cecal.
.Vliii.-
'.' ia Hi ir a- ti.-n. these I'ir.i
at
tic t!i
, lar.
Opt
t'.:e !! !-,t tiioi-' t:i and searching cathai
iint ca.i emtisoved, and nt-vcr piv
u niiie.s-t f ii iM.vri-jsi arc intlained, an
ud
a tht-ir nilincn-o is iieannz. I hev ntnti
iJU
tlie .'i'it : fir-- and iliirestive orrr'ins! tl
rate to piirii'yaii l enrich the .!xkI, anil
li:i
art re-.ewe-.l liealrii and vigor to tl
hi svsr.ni.
Prepared by Dr. J. C. Ayer St Co.,
I'ract ie:il -.ni Aimlj'tioKl Cli-inli.t!,
Lows:!, fViass.
SOLD V ALL natUGldT EVEUTWUKaS.
Schlegel t& Nieman,
Successors to A. Sculkhel & lino.,
Manufacturers of
And dealers In
SMOKEltS' FANCY AKTICLES, SMOKING
and CHEWING
TOBACCOS.
Special E HANDS and sizes of CIGARS made to
order, and satisfaction guaranteed. Cigar
clippings cold for smoking tobacco.
Maiu Street, one door west of J. S. Duke's store
OjiioxUe Punt Office,
PLATTSMOUTH. NEB. Im3
U V Mathe ws,
DEALER IN
Hardware, Cutlery, ITails,
Iron, Tl'ason Stork,
STOVES and TIN -WARE,
Iron, Wood Stonk, Pumps,
Ammunition,
FIELD & GARDEN HEEDS, HOPE,
AND ALL KINDS OF SHEET
IRON WORK, Kept in Stock.
Malting and Repairing,
DONE WITH
NEATNESS & DISPATCH.
All Work Warranted.
iitt
J. C CHAMBERS,
Manufacturer of and Dealer in
iEilLSi.ISJSSSS,
SADDLES.
COLLARS,
HALTERS,
WHIPS
ETC., ETC., ETC.
REPAIRING
Done with Neatness! Dispatch.
Tfce only place in town where" "Turley's pat
ent self adjustable horse collarsare 8ola.'r
4!nt
HEW HARDWARE STORE.
J. S. DUKE
lias just opened an entile new stock of hard
ware, on
Nest door west of Chapman ,t Sniitirs Druj
More.
A Full Line of
SHELF HARDWARE,
SHOVELS, RAKES, SPADES ana
ALL GARDEN TOOLS.
NAILS, NAILS, NAILS, ly the Ke
or I'ound-
ROPE, POWDER. SHOT, GRIND
STOSES
WHEEL-BARROWS.
A "Full Line of (ITI.EKY.
Special Ratt tc iuilders and Cun-
tractors.
All good.s sohiras lov a they possibly can be
and live. 41v
KENDALL'S
SPAVIN
CTTIEIE
nr
f f V -M '' -"rlOMtMueces.srul Itemedy
F I I -"-"sever discovered, a it i certain in its
v. . uim nor.- ioi.
i:r:At) pisook iiklow.
From Rev. P. N. Grander,
rreiding Elder of the St. All.an's Iistrict.
St. ALitASi.VT., Jan. 2Uh, lsso.
Dr. 1?. .1. Kendall & Co.. Gents : In reply to
votir letter I will say that uiy experience with
Kendall's Spavin Cure lias been very satisfac
tory indeed. Three or four years ago I procur
ed a bottle of your aent, and with it cured a
lorse of lameness caused by a spavin. Last
eason mv horse became very lame, and I turn
ed him out for a ft w weeks when he became
letter : hut when I put him on tlie road he uot
worse, when 1 discovered that a ring-bone was
loriiiinir. I procured ; bottle of Kendall's
Spavin Cure, and with less tliii" a bottle cured
linn so that he is not lame, neither can the
bunch he found.
Kespeetfiiliv Yours. F. N. GltANr.ER.
I'rice 1 ter bottle, orsix hot ties for $5, All
driicg'sl have it or can get it for you, or it will
he sent to any address on reeipt of price by
tlie proprietors, l. J. KENDALL & C J.,
i-.nosDiii mi rans, cruiout.
C. F. Cookman, Ais't Omaha, Neb.
GEORGE A. CLARK,
SOLE AGENT.
The KKST and JIOST rorrilAR
New inc Xljread of Modern Times.
BEWARE Or EIITATIOXS.
For sale bv E. . Dovev & Son. Solomon &
Nathan. WmHerold, W. li. 15ai4fr & Co.. L.
Kaliskv & Son.
SAGE BROTHERS,
Dealers in -
S T O "V IE S ,
ETC., ETC., ETC
One Door East of the Fost-Of!ic, Plattsmouth,
Nebraska.
.. ..:o:
Fiactictil Workers in 4b
SHEET IRON, ZINC, TIN, BRA
ZIEliY,dcdc. Lanje assortment of Hard ana Soft
Pumps, Gass Pipes and Fittings.
OO-AJH. STOYES,
Wood and Coal Stoves lor
HEATING OR COOKING,
Always oa Hand.
2ve,ry variete- of Tin, Sheet Iron, and Zinc
Work, kept iu Stock.
MAKING AND REPAIRING,
Done ou Short Notice.
"EVEKITHLYO WARRANTED !
l'KICKS LOW VOWX..
SAGE BROS.
"O" S3 S3
f
PROFESSIONAL. CARDS
IHt. J. L.. JIcCKKA,
HOMCEPATniC PHYSICIAX. at Factory
vilie, Cass county, Nebraska. 24ly
IU. IX. JIEADK, -
PHYSICI A.N and SURGEON, onice In Fitz
gerald Block, which w ill be open day or n-
T. It. WIL.KOX,
ATTORNEY AT LAW. rracticei In Saun
ders and Cass Counties. Ashland, Nebraska.
M. A. IIAUTIUAX,
ATTORNEY AND SOLICITOR. Will Prac
tice In th State and Federal Courts. Resi
dence. Plattsmouth. Nebraska. tUy
It. IC UVIXtiSTOX. m. r.
l'HTSICIAN & SURGEON.
OFriCE HOURS, from 10 a. m., to 2 p. m.
Examining Surgeon for U. S. Pension.
JB. W. II. meiIILlK.KCIIT.
PRACTISING PHYSICIAN. reidece on
Chiinu-'O Avenue. Piattsmoutli. Nebrsaska.
Office In C. E. Wescott's Clothing Store. 42Iy
wirii s. wise.
COLLECTIONS M. SfJCZjiLTT.
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Real Estate. Fire In
surance and Collection Agency. Otlice in Fitz
gerald's block. Plattsmouth, Nebraska. 22in3
4AKO. . SMITH,
ATTORNEY AT LAW and Real Estate Bro
ker. Special attention ;iven to Collection"
and all matters aftectinj; thtt title t real estate.
Olllce on 2d floor over Post Office. 1'lattsmouth.
Nebraska. 40 1.
l. II. WUEKIiER Jt CO.
LAW OFFICE, Real Estte, Fire and Life In
surance Agents. Plattsmouth, Nebraska. Col
lectors, tax -payers. Have a complete abstract
of titles. Buy and sell real estate, negotiate
loans, &e. I5yl
JOICX SIUltFIX,
NOTARY". PUBLIC Will attend te buying
and selliiig lands, examining titles, makinit
deeds, paying taxes and collecting debts. V ill
also attend to law suits before a Justice of tlie
Peace.
47tf Factory ville, Cass Co. Nek.
SAM. M. CHAPJIAS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
And Solicitor in Chancery. Office in Fitzger
ald Block,
191 PLATTSMOUTH, NEB.
R. Ii. Windham. D. A. CAMrKsxr,.
Attorney at Law. Notary Public.
tVI!tIilAM it CAMPHELL.
COLLECTION AND KEAL ESTATE AGENTS
Ofhcaover W. II. Baker & Go's Store.
PlatUmouth, Nebraska. 20ly
JAMES E. MOIIRISOX, W. L. I'.UOWNE.
Notary l'ub'.ic.
moiiitiAO' & bkowsi:,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. Will pra: tice in Cass
and adjoining Counties ; gives special attention
to collections and abstracts of title. Office in
Fitzgerald Block, Plattsmouth, Nebraska.
Uvl .
STF.VFASOX & JIl'RFIX,
ATTORNEY'S AT LAW, Plattsmonth and
Nebraska Cty, Neb.
iHOS. B. STKVKNSOX, I E. J. MUKKIN,
Nebraska City, Over Sinitli & Black's
Neb. i Drug Store,
13ly I Plattsmouth. Neb.
4; IV. OLl'TTEH.
DB3MTIST.
IMattsmonth. Nebraska.
Office on Main Street over Solomon & Na
than's Store. 3y
PLATTSMOUTH MILLS.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEB.
C. II IMS l: I., - Proprietor.
Flour, Corn Meal & Feed
Always on hand and for sale at lowest cash
prices. The highest prices paid for Wheat and
Corn. Particular attention given custom work.
CHARLES W ARK EX. "
Tonsorial Artist.
PL. ATTS.11 4 I'TH X K It It A SKA.
Place of business on Main St.. between 4th
and Mlt streets. Shampooing, Shaving, chil
dren's hair cutting, etc. etc. 19ly
FRED. D. LEHNHOFF, ,
Morning Dew Saloon !
South-east corner Main and Sixth Streets.
Keep the best of
Beer, Wines, Liquors & Cigars.
331119 Constantly on nand.
BRICK! BRICK!
If you want any
Fire or Ornamental Brick,
Call on
J. T. A. HOOVER,
LOUISVILLE, - - NEBRASKA.
BATES & KOHNKE.
"New Carpenter Shop on Main Street,
Corner of 7tli.
BUILDERSCONTRACTORS
GENERAL WORKMEN
In the Carpenter line.
SIGN, CARRIAGE AND ORNA
MENTAL PAINTER,
Shop over the Brick Block next t
II. Boeck's.
PLATTSMOUTH, 4ly NEB.
Excelsior Barber Shop.
J. C. BOONE,
One door west of Solotnonjit Nathan's Store.
SHAVING AND SHAMPOOING
Especial attention given to .
CUTTING CHILDREN'S AND LA
DIES' HAIR.
ALL AND SEE BOOXE, GEXTS,
And get a boon in a
CIEoNr SHAVE
WILLIAM HEROLD,
dealer In
DRY GOODS,
CLOTHS.
BL.A2fKE.TS,
FLAYNELS,
FURNISHING G00D3
GROCERIES OF ALL KINDS.
Large stock of
BOOTS and SHOES
to be
CLOSED OUT AT COST
Notions, Queensware,
and tn faet everything you san call for in
the line of
GeuAral Merchandise.
CASH BALD FOR HIDES AND FURS.
AU kinds of country uroUuee token in ex
change for goods,
mm MORPHINE btbtta
l.t.ty q4 .r-ecdily cunA. Vua
No publicity. Sead itimp
Ibr fall rrlicu'um. Pr Cirltoa,
DPUM
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
Stale 2)ireclcry.
A. S. PADDOCK. U. S. Senator, Beatrice.
ALVIN SAUNDERS. U. S. Senator, Omaha.
E. K. VALENTIN E, Represeutat'e. West Point.
ALUINl'S NANCE. Governor, Lincoln.
S. J. ALEXANDER, Secretary of State.
F. W. LEIDTKE, Auditor, Lincoln,
G. M. BA RT LETT, Tretisurer. Lincoln.
S. R. THOMPSON. Supt. Public Instruction.
F. M. DAVIS. Land Commissioner.
C. .1. DILWORTH. Attorney General.
REV. C. C. HARRIS. Chaplain of Penitentiary.
DR. H. P. MAXTHEWSON, Supt. Hospital for
the Insane.
Supreme Court.
S. MAXWELL, Chhjf Justice, Fremont.
GEO. B. LAKE, Omaha.
AM AS A COBB, Lincoln.
Second Judicial District.
S. B. POUND, Judge, Lincoln.
J. C. WATSON, Prosecuting-Att'y, Neb. City.
W. C. SHO WALTER, Clerk District Court,
Plattsmouth.
o
County Directory.
A. N. SULLIVAN, County Judge.
J. D. TUTT. County Clerk.
J. M. PATTERSON, County Treasurer.
R. W. HYERS. Sheriff.
K. H. WOOL EY, Co. Sup't Tub. Instruction.
U. W. FA I RFIELD, Surveyor.
P. P. GASS, Coroner.
COUNTY COMMIHSIONF.nS.
JAMES CRAWFORD. South Bend Precinct.
SAM'L RICHARDSON. Mt. Pleasant Precinct.
ISAAC WILES, Plattsmouth Prccitiet.
City Directory,
J. W. JOHNSON, Mayor.
J. M. PATTERSON, Treasurer.
J. D. SIM PSO.V. City Clerk.
RICHARD VIVIAN, Police Judge.
W. D. JONES, Chief of Police.
F. E. WHITE, Chief of Fire Dept.
COUNCILS E
lft Ward F. GOUDER. C. H. PARMELE.
2d Ward G W. FAIRFIELD, J. V. WECK-
l BACH.
3d Ward D. MILLER. THOS. POLLOCK.
4th Ward P. McGALLAN,
iotlntatleriSO. W. MARSHALL.
B. & M. R. KTime Table.
Taking EpecT April 11. 13S0.
FOR OMAHA fTToM l'LATTSMOUTn.
Leaves 8 :H0 a. in. Arrives 10 :05 a. in.
3 -A) p. in. 5 too p. m.
FROM OMAHA FOIt PLATTSMOUTH.
Leaves 9 :00 :u 111. Arrives 10 :10 a. in.
" 6 :30 p. in. 8 :lo P-
FOR THE WEST,
leaves Plattsmouth 0 :30 a. m. Anives Lin
coln, 12 -15 p. in. ; Arrives Kearney, 7: 40 p. in.
Freight leaves at 10 -JO a. 111. and at 7 :15 p. in.
Arrive at Lincoln at 4 :35 p. m. and 12 :20 a. ni.
FROM THE WEST.
Leaves Kearney. 5 :on a, 111. Leaves Lincoln,
1 .05 p. in. Arrives Plattsmouth. 4 :2" p. n
Freight leaves Lincoln at 11 :15 a. m. and 4 :00
a. in. Arrives at Plattsmouth at 4 ;0 p. 111. and
e :50 a. m .
GOING EAST.
Express. 6 :Wi a. m.
Passenger, (train each day) 4 :25 p. m., except
Saturday. Every third Saturday a I rain con
nects ill tlie usual time.
It. V. It. It. Time Ta?!e
Tahing Effect Suudoy, Ajtril 11, 13S0
WEST. STATIONS. KAST.
5:Hf.pm HASTINGS. 8:10am
6:07 AK. 7 :10
0 BLUE 11 ILL. 1 :0
7:( , COWLKS. :4'J
7:23 AM BOY 6:32
7 ::15 RED CLCUD. 0 :'-'0
8 :00 1NAVALK. 6:00
8:15 lUvERTON. 5 :4S
8:50 FRANKLIN. 5:22
9 :0. BLO )M I N GTON. 5 :0!
9:L'0 PERTH 4:5.5
9:41 REPL HL1CAN 4 :35
9 :5ti ALMA 4 :20
10:15 ar. oriFWS rve 4:00:1111
7::J0am I've) ORLEANS f 4 .30pin
9:00 OXFORD 3 :M
10 -.30 ARAPAHOE 2 :00pm
ARRIVAL AXI I K I A ItT I" R K OF
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JSTcvtioTLoZ (RepTjJfLicaj'L TLcltet !
-o-
For President of tne United States,
' i -y
GEN. JAMES A. GARFIELD,
OTJ1 OHIO.
Bessics Answer.
EI If. I. V.
"You've a letter, Bessie! What news, what
news?"
Cries stout Tom Manncring. pioneer,
As into hia cabin, with weary thowf,
He strides at even, his children dear
A-frisk at his heals with their lambkin-ways.
When Bessie looks up, "with her wifely
eniilc,
Trom the open letter, which yet her gaz
Seems lingering in her lap the while,
"It is father writes; and he asks a place,
For his age with us in the backwoods here.
Tie has lost his all; and both Maud and Grace
Refuse him aid; and he's ill, I fear."
'Oh, ho!" And Tom, with his eyebrows knit.
His axo in a corner stands, and then,
With the bairns at his knee, and his plp alit,
Begins to give to the news his ken.
" 'Tislittlo we owe your father, Bess,'
lie says at length. "And, because yon
linked
Tonr fate with mine In the wilderness,
He never so much as a godsend winked.
While lands and houses he lavished on
Your sisters when they were richly wed.
What say yon? Now that his fortune's gone.
They've neither a roof to shield his head?"
"No, Tom. They , are Migrates heartless,
cold I
Jnst read the letter; It makes me cry
For rage and pity," " Not I ! cries bold
And cheery Tom, with a brightening eye,
As he dnnillestlie little ones, one by one,
"You're a Christian woman, and therefore
free
To answer tho letter as you'd have done
Had he lavished his favors on you and me."
"Let me kiss you first, Tom. There! I knew
Just what you would say," says the bouny
wife,
And 6he straightway up to the table drew,
Where her pen, .with phrases ot kindness
rife.
Soon fashioned a letter, whose homely pith
Was, "Haste, my father, oh, haste to mo I
Hero is shelter and rest for your gray head
with
.y Tom, anil me, and the children threo."
"Now listen, sho says; and her goodrnan
hears
The simple lines from her fall heart writ,
While her brown eyes glistened with happ7
tears,
And tho cnrly-patcs at their elliows flit.
What a time we shall have!" Tom, laughing
cries.
Nell, Jenny, and Sandy thnt letter see,
Tis a white-dove message that wawsrd flies
To wait a grandfather to children three!"
0SLY FOR HIS SAKE."
BT M. It. C.
" t r?XtvlV.; VlV ' f " i
One blusterous, iiilit Mrs. Jornin?;
hani leaned back in Iter cozy nrinclinii
with a sigh of selfish comfort as she
laid the Japanese 6crccn between her
delicate face and the ardent fire.
fcfhe was a handsome woman, who
wore diamonds and velvet 'is a queen
wears her royal robes a wealthy wo
man used to command -mid control;
haughty and dogmatic in her uosilive
ness. And this evening she was iu her
most positive, imperious mood, as she
nat there, making her decision about
Lila Uarton.
Then she rang for lights, an 1 by tho
servant sent a message lor. 3diss "llar
ton to wait upon her as soon its Mas
ter Horace and Miss Giuuvra could
dispense with her services.
It was ten minutes later when Lita
obeyed the summons ami came into
Mrs. Jerniiighain'd presence a slen
ticr, pale-laced girl of sixteen or sev
enteen, with lovely brown eyes, soft
as velvet, and a great mass of brown
hair on her small, graceful head a
delicate, rclliicd, thoughtful-looking
gii J, who bore the indisputable traces
of having worked almost beyond her
strength.
She came quietly near to Mrs. Jer
liinghaui, and stood awaiting that
lady's pleasure.
"1 sent to have a word with you on
a subject very distasteful to me, in
deed, Miss liarton," Mrs. Jerniiig
hain began, coldly. "I refer to a dis
play of forwardness and boldness on
your part towards certain gentlemen
1 might name, which has been called
to my attention more than once. I de
sire to K;iy thnt I sliall not tolerate
nny further attempts on your pirt.
Miss liarton, to flirt with gentleman
visiting at the house notably with
Doctor Dormer. Ah, do not inter
rupt me, and, I am indignantly sorry
to 6ay, my son also!''
"Mrs. Barton, you "
Lila attempted" to gasp her protest;
but "the cold, relentless voice reso
lutely hushed her.
"Denials are more than useless, Miss
Barton. It is a notorious fact that
you, a mere servant a common nursery-governess
and seamstress, boldly
attempted to engross Doctor Dor
mer's attention hist night an 1 one or
two evenings last week when you
were ordered to attend to the chil
dren in the drawing-room. Again,
upon more than one occasion, you
have inveigled my son into conversa
tions with yoli you, whom his mo
ther hires as a servant! Miss Barton,
I have"
Lila was standing there, white and
shivering, her eyes lull of a horrified
mortification ami insulted pride.
"Mrs. Jcrningham," she interrupted,
hotly,"! cannot permit you to launch
6tich a torrent of abuse at inc. It is
not true that I have tried to llirt with
your guests or your son. Doctor
Dormer spoke to me, and I answered,
as anyone would have done. As to
your son "
And her lips curled involuntarily
a gesture which did not escape Mrs.
Jcrningham's eyes.
"We will uot discuss tlio subject
For Vice-President of tlie United States,
GEN. CHESTER A. ARTHUR.
OF 1TEW YOZRIEZ.
further. You have acted disgrace
fully, and, iu justice to my little
innocent children, I have decided to
remove them from your care over
them. You are discharged from to
night, and in place of a month's no
tice you can have a month's wages, as
is my custom with all my servants.
As to a character," and the cold eyes
took a malicious look at the pale,
trembling girl, "of course, that is out
of the question. That will do, Miss
Barton."
She pushed some gold pieces to
wards her, but Lila tlid not touch
them.
Instead, her face grew suddenly cold
and haughty, and she walked out
without any further protest.
And, somehow, Mis. Jcrningham
realized that she had done something
more th in simply dischargo a ser
vant.
"It's a shame a
Aunt Tabith said,
4 '
burning shame!"
indignantly. "It
seems to me that nowadays the
licit
You
do nothing but mini tne poor.
poor child, you don't cry any more
about it! Th.it Jerningham woman
isn't any very great shakes herself,
you take my word for it, or she'd not
be thinking such things about you.
Don't cry, Lila. Cheer up, anil we'll
out for a walk
in the park thii
afternoon, eh ?"
But Lila would not
cheer
up, nor
did she iro with dear old aunt Ta
bitha for a walk to the park. In
stead, she had cried and worried her
fcelf into a hot fever that delieiT all
home remedies a fever that ran
higher and hotter, until even aunt
Tabitlia thought it was best to send
for a doctor; and a doctor was sent
for by little Tony Win ton, next lloor
above.
"And be quick about it, too," she
said, slipping a penny into his grimy
little paw. "You can run round to
Doctor Brown's in a few minutes, I
know, and tell hiin to come round."
But Dr. Brown wasn't at home out
of town for several days and Tony's
wits were puzzled to know whether,
so long as Miss Lila was so awfully
ill, one doctor wasn't just as good as
another; and, in that full belief, ho
rushed oil' for his mother's family
physician, to find Dr. Sampson also
not available.
And then, td'stand disconsolately
at a street corner, wondering hat ou
earth would become of Miss Lila, just
as a doctor's carriage passed him
evidently a doctor's, and a well-to-do
one, too, as witness the well-appointed
brougham, tho proud-stepping
horse, the handsome robe.
And ragged little Tony, all una
ware he was an instrument of unalter
able fate, succeeded in attracting Dr.
Dormer's attention.
"Hi! stop! You're wanted at Miss
Lila's Barton's, No. 74 Canford street
sharp, too! Goin'?"
Lila Barton I Koy Dormer was
surprised, and conscious of a pleasure
able sensation along with it.
"All right, my boy! I'll bq there
beiore you are."
And sure enough, when Tony
reached home, there stood tho doc
tor's carriage at the door, an object of
envious admiration for a score of ur
chins; while Uoy Dormer was sitting
in aunt Tabitha'a snug little parlor,
explaining the cause of his appear
ance, and listening to her account of
Lila's illness.
"And now, if you'll allow mc to sec
my patient he said.
And then he went in, to find Lily
delirious and talkative, and entirely
unconscious.
"Of course it is not true," she said,
as he sat down beside the pure white
cot. "I never flirted with Martin
Jcrningham, or Doctor Dormer,
either. It wasn't fair of her to turn
me olT without a character, was it?
And aunt Tabitha and I are so poor."
And, although he knew there was
no recognition iu her bright eyes, still
his face liu-died.
"She is very ill," he said, gravely.
"I will s-.'C her again this afternoon,
Mrs. Lawson."
That was tho beginning of their
friendship ; and when, three months
later, Lila was sufficiently restored to
accept a situation as traveling com
panion to a lady, she knew that her
most valued friend in all the world
was Dr. Dormer.
A perfect afternoon, even for la belle
Pari, and Mrs. Jerningham, leaning
back in her chair beside the window
of her grande salon, thought that life
in the gay city was tho one thing de
sirable, and would be the one glorious
thing, were it not for her son Martin.
For her son, her darling, her chief
pride, for whom nothing iu the world
was too good ; for whom marriageable
maidens and shrewd mothers had an
gled visioly and linvisibly, who never
yet had been disappointed or thwart
ed in all his life, was in a state of des
peration and distress that made Mrs.
Jcrningham wonder, in agitation and
disinav, what would bj the result of
it all."
Aud "it all" meant that Martin Jcr
niugliam was in love with Mrs. "War
ringdale's charming young friend and
companion our own Lila Barton,
whom, two years before, Mrs. Jcruing
liani had turned out of doors.
"She will not listen to me," Martin
had said to his mother, before he went
out that afternoon. "I tell you I must
have her, too before another twenty
four hours goes over my head, mother.
Utdoss 1 get her for my wife, Pll
shoot myself just as euro as fate. I
' I vs ..v;xv VNfc 1 r -N. -i,A. ,u "'SV .'
never cared so much for anything or
anybody before, and its only the
memory of your cruel treatment of
her tho tec ling that 6hc thinks you
would not sanction an
that keeps us apart."
engagement
"You think that?" slie said, trem
bling. "1 know it," ho answered, hotly.
"She is gracious and kind, but beyond
that, I tell you her just pride restrains
her. Look here, mother, it you want
toito me a favor if vou don't want to
have me brought in dead some time
you will go and tell her you want her
for your daughter."
And Mrs. JeiHiingham knew, as 6hc
looked upon her son's handsome, hag
gard lace, that ewn if it killed her to
so humble herself, she must do it for
his sake.
"It is awfully cruel of you," 6ho
said pitcously, nnd he interrupted her,
firmly
"You can tako your choice Lila
Barton for your daughter, or get
along without me!"
"Martin!"
"I mean it. She won't refuse mo if
you ask her. By Jove ! she is the only,
woman in the world I shall ever ask.
Sho shall accept mc!"
"I think there is no danger of her
refusing such ail offer," she said, a lit
tle of tlie old scornfulncss in her voice.
"Of course you will go," he answer
ed, decidedly. "When I come back at
seven to dinner, I shall hear what you
have to say from her."
Then he had gone, and Mrs. Jcr
ningham had sat in trouble and dis
may, thinking it all out, wondering
how she could accomplish her errand,
and yet not sacrifice her pride how
she could conciliate Lila Barton, nnd
yet give her to understand it was an
honor she had come to offer her.
Sho ordered her carriage, and, dress
ed in a most elaborate toilet, was
driven to Mrs. Warringdalc's, where,
surrounded by all the luxuries of
wealth and refinement, Lila Bartou
had ay on her way to heart, and made
not only the confidential friend, but
the beloved daughter aud choice com
panion. As Mrs. AVarningdale's friend, socie
ty had opened it most exclusive doors,
aud our little Lila had found herself
almost unconsciously, a pet and favor
ite iu pleasant social circles where
her personal attractiveness, her sweet
wiiisoniencss, her refined intelligence,
held the position given her.
And Martin Jerningham had renew
ed his acquaintance with-his mother's
discharged governess, and
Tii is was the result Mrs. Jerniug
ham waiting in Mrs. Warringdalc's
parlor for Lila Barton to come, with
whom sho was to plead in her son's
behalf
It seemed like some impossible bur
lesque, as she waited, and there was a
sharp struggle within her between
pride and love for her son that idol
and darling who had never been de
nied, and who ruled her with a rod of
iron.
For his sake. Only, solely for his
sake. And then Lila Barton came in
a vision of elegance, and loveliness, and
sweetness in her soft, white dress.
She greeted Mrs. Jerningham in a
courteous way, and then waited in
quiringly, and, perhaps, just a trifle
haughtily.
Aud Mrs. Jerningham rushed at
once into her errand.
"X j doubt you will be quite surpris
ed to receive a message ot which I am
bearer, because usually such messages
are delivered personally, Miss Barton.
But, as 1 am willing to remove any
obstacle from the way to my son's
happiness, I determined that in no
better way could the accomplishment
of his wishes be decided than by my
coming iu a perfectly friendly way to
you."
She had not sacrificed her dignity,
and certainly had spoken very well.
And Lila, her lace expressive of
surprise, listened.
"I think 1 do not at all understand
j'ou, Mrs. Jerningham. You have
evidently undertaken some commis
sion from your son, but what, might I
inquire?"
This from the girl she had dis
graced! But she nut the curb on her
self, and went blandly on, for her boy's
sake
"Your delicacy certainly does you
credit, I cannot express how dclight-
lully charming 1 hud it, my dear Miss
Barton, its, 1 ain commissioned by
my son to make you an offer of his
hand, his name, his position, his affec
tions. Anl, JUiss Barton, it you will
charitably permit ine, I cordially en
dorse whatever will conduce to Mar
tin's happiness."
And, tor the first tune in her life.
Mrs. Jerninghain realized that she had
eaten humble-pie.
A curious little look had swept over
Lila's lac.
"Will you tell Mr. Jcrningham for
me, please, tint in the society in which
I move it is liol ctistoiuary forgentlcin'Mi
to do their proposals of marriage by
proxy? Will vmu also be kind enough
to tell him that under any circum
stances I could not possibly consider
his offer? And will you iuform him
that I have been engaged to Doctor
Dormer for the past three months?
And, as Mrs. Warringdalc's carriage
is waiting, and I have an engagement
at half-past live, be so good as to ex
cuse me, Mrs, Jerningham."
And so Lila's turn came, and like a
young duchcs3, she bowed to the wo
man who had, all unconsciously, been
her fate, while Mrs. Jerningham went
back to her son.
But as, a year afterwards, Mrs. Dor
mer, sitting in her drawing-room, read
aloud to aunt Tabitha the notice of
Martin Jcrningham's marriage, it was
self-evident he did not commit the
6uicide lie threatened unless rushing
into marriage with a pretty girl, after
a month's acquaintance, be considered
as such.
London Truth : "I had noticed in
.an opposite box a lady in cream color
ed satin and supero ornaments wno
appeared to be more than half asleep.
As I was coming out 1 encountered
her. A gentleman in faultless even
ing dress was addressing her in a low
voice I heard him say, 'Stand as
straight as you can . The carriage will
be here in a moment. You must stand
straight!' A kind of desperate look
was on his face. His companion was
intoxicated! A few moments later
he almost lifted her into the carriage
which rolled away to one of the state
liest 'homes of England if home it
cau be called where the master shun3
the eye of his servants, knowing thai
they are aware of his wife's disgrace."
CAN WOMEN DRIVE I
An Old LIverjnian's Experience of the
Sex.
(Albany Journal.
"Isn't it rather singular that women
never learn how to drive a horse prop
erly V" remarks some irate man as he
inspects a tired animal, and finds the
bridle over its ears, and the bits half
way down its throat.
"But women can drive," cries a cham
pion of the sex. "Don't they drive sev
en or eight miles to market with veg
etables or loads of hay ? Don't they
take their babies out to rido whenever
they can get hold of a horse? Why,
there never was a weman who could
not drive, and some of them cau han
dle a horse much better than their hus
bands can."
"Can women drive, and do you let
them handle your best horses?" were
the questions put to a good-natured
livery keeper by an interested party.
"Drive?'' answered the letter-out of
equines, "I should think they could;
but as to letting them our best horses,
that is another matter. We have hors
es in our stables few men can drive.
We keep what we call safe horses for
ladies' use the kind that will go any
where if you just guide them, old fam
ily nags, sensible enough to trot along
and mind their own business, and not
fret if they are pulled two ways at
once."
"Do you object to letting herses out
for women to drive?"
"No, indeed; we have from twelve to
fifteen ladies tt week come to uj for
horses, aud Ave giye them good ones,
too; but somehow women tret horses
when they drive them, so we don't care
to give theiu high-spirited animals.
Now look at that sorrel," pointing to
one from whom the harness had just
been removed. "I let that horse this
morning to a bit of a woman with
wrists no bigger than my two lingers.
I didn't want to let it go, because it's
such an ugly puller. 1 told her it had
a mouth like iron, but she said she'
wanted te take an old aunt, that was
visiting hei, out to see the town, and
she drove off quietly enough. But half
an hour after I saw her coming down
Woodward avenue Iiko a streak of
lightning, everybody running to get
out of the way, and the old aunt hang
ing on for dear life. She just had the
lines wound around those little wrists,
and braced her feet on the dash board,
and when she came to a corner whisk
ed round it on one wheel. The rig camo
in all right, but that horse won't get
its breath for a week."
"Do they often meet with accidents
and have a smash-up?"
"No. It is curious, but a woman will
take a team through a dozen hair
breadth escapes and bring it back all
right. Wo have any amount of trouble
with men, who tako our best rigs, get
on a spree, and break things all to pie
ces. A woman is either more cautious,
or she will call upon every man in
sight to help her out of the scrape,
Thy are more apt to lose their heads
in a crowd or collision, but there is
most always some special providence at
hand to help them. If you notice, the
most disastrous runaways happen
when some man has the reins."
Further talk developed the fact that
women were not considerate in their
management of horses. They forget to
blanket them in winter aud to tie them
in the shade in summer. They some
times use the reins as hitching straps,
and have a settled dislike to learning
proper names fei harness. Not one in
a hundred could tell the difference be
tween the surcingle and the martin
gale, or had the least idea to which end
of the animal the crupper belonged,
and if compelled to divest ahorse of
its trappings would undo every buckle
in the service, and take the collar off
over the animal's head, to all of which
the intelligent beast would submit, as
if charmed, by being steadily talked to
during the process in the bewitching
tones of a woman s voice.
All of this may be a libel on the sex,
but it is certainly true that when an
old family horse, with a ten-minute
gait, comes see-sawing down the street
with a comically reckless air of run
ning away, a woman's head look3 out
from under the buggy top, a woman's
hand guides the steed in its eccentric
orbit, and a woman's voice shouts, in
distinct tones, "Wh-o-o-a-a," at the
same moment that the reins are jerked
and the whip.applied, while pedestri
ans scud to the sidewalk in terror ; and
however liable a woman is to run over
a cow or a street car, she will always
stop or turn out for a baby. This is
one of the instincts ef her maternal
heart, to which even "get up !gl-a-n-g"
is sacrificed.
Bill English is shown up as the poor
man's friend Avith a vengeance by the
correspondent of the Cincinnati Com
mercial. That industrious scribe, a
few days atro, looked over the court re
cords at Indianapolis, and found that
from the latter part of ls3 to the end
of 1879, English, as plaintiff, had se
cured judgments for foreclosures of
mortgages apainst 18 defendants, or
an averrge of neatly one for every
week of the time. During about the
Fame length of time he took 52 Sher
iffs deeds for property foreclosed. In
addition to the above he appears on
the records to be the owner of 78 ti
tles against real estate, nearly all the
certificates having been issued in April
1879, and March, 1880. How the
workmen and struggling business men
in Indianapolis must love Bill En
glish. Ex.
Andrew's Bazar for September
is, if possible, better than ever. IU
illustrations and explanations ortlie
coming Fall styles arc excellent.
Another feature of this paper is, that
perplexing ques'ions about making
over old dresses receive attention. The
articles on "Home Dressmaking" alone
will save many times the single dol
lar, the subscription price of this
journal. Mothers will find in this nurn-
ber valuable suggestions about cim-
dren's garments. In "Fashion Chit-
Chit will be found many points oi
interest. "Nathalie Key," by Catlin.is
by far the best serial yet published in
The Bazar, and will be read with deep
interest bv all. In a pungent editori
al the subject of divorce is ably com
mented on. The Supplement contains
announcements which show, to say the
least, a spirit of journalistic enterprise
on the part of the Publisher. We
would advise our lady readers who are
unacquainted with Andrews' Bazar to
send 10 cents for the September uuui-
ber to W. It. Andrews, Publisher,
Tribune Building N. Y.
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