Nebraska herald. (Plattsmouth, N.T. [Neb.]) 1865-1882, August 05, 1880, Image 1

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    The Herald.
The Herald.
PUBLISHED EVEKY THURSDAY, -AT
PLATTSMOOTH, NEBRASKA.
OFFICE:
Or. Vine St., One Block North of Main,
Cor. of Fifth Street.
Izrpst CitnhSsa tf ej Paf ei in Caa tot.
ADVEBTI8ISC BATES.
EJRAIJD).
pace It. 2w. 3w. lm.l
1 qr... $1 00 $1 CO $2 00 $2 to
Jsurs. 1 GO 2 00 2 75 3 25
Ssqrs. 2 00 2 75 4 00 4 73
iicol. 6 00 $ 00 1000 1200
Hcol.. SO0 1300 1500 1800
1 Col. .. 1500 1800 2000 2500
$5 00
660
S 00
2000
$100
10 00
1300
28 00
23 0M 40 00
40oo ao oo
HT All Advertising Bills Due Quarterly.
IW Transient Adrertisments moat be r4
In Ad ranee.
JNO. A. MACMURPHY, Editor. J
"PERSEVERANCE CONQUERS.
TERMS : $2.00 a Year.
VOLUME XVI. V
PLATTSMOUTH, NEBRASKA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 5,1880.
NUMBER 20.
t"3T Extra Copies of the Hkbald for sale by
J. P. Youwo, at the Poat-Offlea Newt Depot,
Main Street.
Terms In Advance:
One copy, one t?-0
One copy, six montVin t.00
One copy, three months, CO
FIEST
National Bank
OF PLATTSMOUTH. NEBRASKA,
Ioh.v Fitzoerald. ..
E. ;. Iovkv
A.. W. MCLAUGHLIN..
JONH O KOUKKE
President.
Vice President.
.Cashier.
....Assistant Cashier.
This Bunk Is now open for business at their
iew room, corner Mam and Sixth streets, and
is pi -r pared to transact a general
BANKING BUSINESS.
fct. c ', Bendt, Gold, Government and Local
Securities
BOUGHT AND SOLD.
V'yj'fsits Received and Interest Allow
ed on Time Certificates.
dbafts JDm.-w-jsr,
Iviiii.-ibie in any part of the United States and
In all the Principal Towns and Cities
of Kurope.
AGCXTSFOR TIIK
CELEBRATED
Ik man Line and Allan Lin
OP KTKAMF.KM.
Person wishing to bring out their friends from
Europe can
PURCHASE TICKETS FROM US
Thro ash to Plutttmonth.
tut it's ki'kcifk: ikiici.e.
TRADE MARK The Great Kn-TRADC MARK
Klish iJemedy ;
An unfa 1 1 i n a
cure for Semi
nal weakness.
Spermatorrliea
I in i o t e n c y .
and all diseas- j'i
es that loiio jr
as a sequncej-
IEF0RE TAKIHG. a Loss of AFTEI TAKIRB.
Memory, Universal Lassitude. Pain in the back
Dimness of Vision, Premature Old Age, and
many other diseases that lead to Inwauity or
Consumption, and a Premature Crave.
I Full particulars in our pamphlet, which
we desire to send free by mail to every one.
W The Specific Medicine Is aold byaltdrug-Klft-
at $1 per package, or six packages for5,
or will he sent free by mail on receipt of the
money, by addressing'
THE 4 i It AY MEDICINE CO.,
Mechanics' Block, Detroit. Mich.
tVSo!d in Plattsmouth and everywhere, by
all druggists.
til ni r-a tmu
ihe rarest and Beit Medicine Ter mde.
A romblnstioa of IT.D. Baafca. Maadrake. I
anil Iu4rUn, with all the best and tuurt cur
ure nrupemcw or au ctuer IU ctere makes U crreat-1
tit lil-od I'arlSer, Liver Veft-alatwr. ana life I
and HalU Uevtorlnf Ajrent oa aarUv. I
Ho diieaae or til health can poaeibly long exist I
where Jtup BHtera are used, to ruled and perfect I
r .imr uywiujuiia
ThOT aew lift eae Thjror U Ike aeei aa laflrav
To all whoee emDlormenta c&om lrrMrnlAri-. of I
j v ' n wiu7 uruvw, vr who require an
Appetizer, Tonic and mild Stimulant, Hop bitten
are i&Taluable witaoat latexleatiac.
mo maurr wnac your leounn or rymptoma are
what tun dueuM or ailment in, tue Hop bittrrs
IVoa't wait until too are mietc. but If vnu onl fi
IbadoriuuerablnM th. Bitters at oaoo. It mar
Jut. your Ufa. It aaa aared uundreda,
150O will be paid for a ease ther win not rare or
tula. Do not miller nor Irt your friend Buffer, but
Jje and uro taem to ue Hop Bitten.
Remember. Hop Bitter U no TUe. droned, drank--n
noetram, but the Purest and Leat tTrdicuie ercr
aadet the "Inralld'e Friead a ad Hope," aad
ao penoa or tamilr ahould be without toeta.
Cct aometkla day. a .pjm
Sop Couch CCBX la the rweetest, aaf est aad best.
ask couorca.
The nor Pad for Stomach, Lirer and Eldner Is -.
r. t . 1 ... V. . . f ... - . .i . f .
wiwia wiu i. vj r ril rri UXUW4M
I C la an absolute and irresistible core for drunk
ranees, use ol opium, tobacco and narcotics:
SoUbydniceirf. HeBUtanMt(.Ce.Kecaetter,N.
SBd for Clrcalftr.
It la the best mood Puilflpr and stimulates
every function to more healthful action, and Is
tbiM a twnpfi In all 1iumUMl- I
In eliminating the Impurities of the blood, the
natural and necessary result is the cureof Scrof
ulous and oiner htm r.mpiions ana uiseases,
including cancers, ticen anu oiner rsirea.
DvsDensia. Weakness of tbe stomach, Consti
pation, Dimness, Uenrral Debility, etc., are
cured by tbe Autre Ultton. It is unequaltsd
aa ao appetizer and reeuiar tonic.
1 1 Is a medicine which should be In every iam-
tlv. and which, wherever used, WU1 save the
payment of many doctors' btila.
Bottles, of two sizes; prices, SO cents and $1.00.
SWnrncr's.
Safe lie me
dics arc sold
by Driisrgi-sts
and lclers
In Medicine
everywhere.
EE WARNER & CO.,
s
rrou'ieion,
Rorhesler, N.T.
-S-nd for Pamphlet
ana leauiuoniais.
AM! .
- ' N A - tk.
er s
4
Vtgor,
F03 HESTORlNfi GRAY HAIR TO ITS
NATURAL VITALITY AND COLOR.
It Is a most agreeable dressing, which
Is at once Larmless aud effectual, for pre
serving the hair. It restores, with the J
gloss ami freshness of youth, faded or gray,
ligh?, and red hair, to a rich brown, or deep
l lacl:, as may be desired. By its use thin
hair, is thickened, and baldness often
though not always cured. It checks falling
of the hair immediately, and causes a new
growth iu all cases where the glands are
not decayed: while to brashy, weak, or
otherwise diseased hair, it imparts vitality
and strength, and renders it pliable.
Tue Vigor cleanses the 6calp, cures and
I-re-.cnts the formation of dandruff; and,
l y iis cooling, stimulating, and soothing
r: ortjes, it heals most if not all of the
liuiu,i s and diseases peculiar to the scalp,
kecking it cool, clean, and soft, under
which conditions diseases of the scalp and
likir arc impossible.
As a Dressing for Ladies Hair,
The v ioor is incomparable. It Is color-
k less, contains neither oil nor dye, and will
. ?1 1 . . a
niK. son wnito caniDric it imparts an
agreeable and lasting perfume, and as an
article for the toilet it is economical and
unsurpassed in its excellence.
rRXr-ABXD ST
Dr. J.'C.AER & CO., Lowell, Mass.,
Practical aad Analytical Che mists.
OLD BY ALL D5UOGI3T9
b AM .
Ay
Hair
Schlegel & Nieman,
Successors to A. Schlegel & Bko..
Manufacturers of
I2nTE CIGARS,
And dealers in
SMOKEltS' FANCY ARTICLES. SMOKING
and CHEWING
TOBACCOS.
Special BRANDS and sizes of CIGARS made to
order, and satisfaction guaranteed. Cigar
clippings sold for smoking tobacco.
Main Street, one door west of J. S. Duke's store
OppoxiU 1'imt Office,
PLATTSMOUTH. NEB. Im3
7. V. Mathews,
DEALER IN
Hardware, Cutlery, Nails,
Iron, Wagon Stock,
STOVES and TIN-WARE,
Iron, Wood Stock, Pumps,
Ammunition,
FIELD & GARDEN SEEDS, ROPE,
AND ALL KINDS OF SHEET
IRON WORK, Kept in Stock.
Making and Repairing',
DONE WITH
NEATNESS & DISPATCH.
All Work Warranted.
Am
J. G- CHAMBERS,
Manufacturer of and Dealer in
SADDLES,
COLLARS,
HALTERS,
WHIPS
ETC., ETC ETC.
REPAIRING
Done with Neatness! Dispatch.
Toe only place in town where "Turley's pat
ent self adjustable horse collarsare sold.''
49Cm
NEW HARDWARE STORE.
.J. S. DUKE
Has Just opened an entire
ware, ou
new stock of hard-
Next door west of Chapman & Smith's Dru
Store.
A Full Line of
SHELF HARDWARE,
S HOTELS, RAKES. SPADES ana
ALL GARDEN TOOLS.
NAILS, NAILS, NAILS, ly the Ke
or Pound-
ROPE, POWDER, SHOT, GRIND
STONES,
WHEEL-BARROWS.
A Full Line of ITTI.ERY.
Special Rates ti Guilders and Con
tractors.
All goods soldlas lev
s they possibly can be
and live.
41Y
KENDALL'S
SPAVIN
CUBE
The.tioitueeessrul Remedy
ever discovered, as it is certain in its
enects and does not blivter.
READ FROOF BELOW.
From Rev. 1. N. Granger,
Presiding Elder of the St. Alban's District.
St. Albans. Vt.. Jan. 20th. 1880.
Dr. B. J. Kendall & Co.. Gents : In reply to
your letter I will say that my experience with
Kendall's Suavin Cure has been very satisfac
tory indeed. Three or four years ago I procur
ed a bottle of your agent, and with it cured a
norse 01 lameness caused Dy a spavin. iasi
season inv horse became very lame, and I tuni
ca mm out lor a if w weeKS wnen ue uecame
better ; but when I put him on the road he got
worse, when I discovered that a ring-bone was
form inc. I procured a bottle of Keudall's
Spavin Cure, and with less than a bottle cured
mm so mat ne is sot lame, ueitiier can tue
bunch be found.
itesnectfullv lours. P. N. Granger.
Price SI tier bottle, or six bottles for S5. All
druggists have it or can get it for you, or it will
e sent to any audrees on receipt or price ny
tne proprietors, is. J. ivt.MiALi- a
tnosDurgn tans, ermoui.
C. F. Goodman, Ag't Omaha. Neb.
GEORGE A. CLARK,
SOLE AGENT.
The BEST and HOST POPl'LAR
Sewing Thread of Modern Times.
beware: of rsirTATioxs.
For sale! by E. ti.:Po
Nathan. Wm llerold, W.
& Son. Solomon &
Baker & Co.. L.
KallskTS Son.
SAGE BROTHERS,
Dealers In
STOVES
ETC., ETC., ETC.
One Door East of the Post-Office. Plattsmouth,
Practical Workers In
SHEET IRON, ZINC. TIN,
BRA-
ZlERY,&c&c
Large assortment of Hard ana Soft
Pumps, Gsisa Pipes and Fittings.
JO-Ij STOY
Wood and Coal Stoves tor
HEATING OR COOKING,
Always on Hand.
ivry
variety of Tin, Sheet Iron.
and Zinc
ork, kept in Stock.
MAKING AND REPAIRING,
Done oa Short Notice.
PRICES LOW BOIVX.
SAGEEOS.
ITS B
PROFESSIONAL, CARDS
UK. J. Ii. McCREA,
HOMCEPATHIC PHYSICIAN, at Factory-
ville. Cass county, Nebraska. 241y
X. B. MTLSOX,
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Practices in Saun
ders and Cass Counties. Ashland, Nebraska.
851116
It. II. WIXIHIAH,
ATTOKNEY AT LAW, Plattsmouth. Neb. Of
ficeFront Koom over ciiapinau & binun's
Drug Store. 431y
91. A. HARTIUAX.
ATTORNEY AND SOLICITOR. Will Prac
tice in tha State and Federal Courts. Resi
dence. Plattsmouth. Nebraska, illy
R. IX. LIVIXiHT.V. 31. 1
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON.
OFFICE HOURS, from 10 a. m.. to 2 P. W.-
Examinlng Surgeon for U. S. Pension.
1K. XV. II. MCHILIIKXECIIT,
PRACTISING PHYSICIAN, residence on
Chicago Avenue. Plattsmouth. Nebrsaxka.
Office in C. E. Wescott's Clothing Store. 42ly
nit. K. E. IlEYXOIiO'S,
ALLOPATHIC PHYSICIAN at Rock Bluffs.
Cass County, Neb., will attend calls promptly
at an nours. muz
WIIjIj !. WISE,
COLLECTIONS si SI'HCIA LTT.
ATTORNEY AT LAW. Real Estate. Fire In
surance and Collection Agency. Office in Fitz
gerald's block. Plattsmouth, Nebraska. 22ntf
UEO. H. H3IITH.
ATTORNEY AT LAW and Ileal Estate Bro
ker. Special attention given to Collections
nll nffoxtinir tliA tftlA t n roil uat'itA
Office on 2d floor over Post Office. Plattsmouth.
Nebraska. 40) I.
1. II. W HEELI'.R A CO.
LAW OFFICE. Real Extate, Fire and Life In
surance Agents. Plattsmouth, Nebraska. Col
lectors, tax -payers. Have a complete abstract
of titles. Buy and sell real estate, negotiate
loans, &c. i5'i
JOIIX 31 fit FIX,
NOTARY PUBLIC Will attend
to buying
and
selling lands, examining
titles, making
KM
W
deeds, paying taxes and collecting debts.
also atte
tend to law suits ueiore a jasiice i
Peace.
47tf Factory vilik, cass co. f.b.
SA3I. 31. CIIAP3IA.V
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
And Solicitor In Chancery. Office in Htzger-
ald Block, ,
lyy i 1LA iiMMUuin, i r.t.
JAMES E. MORRISON, W. L. BROWSE,
Notary Public.
3IORRISOX Sl BltOWXE.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. Will practice in Cass
and adjoining Counties ; gives special attention
to collections and abstracts of title. Office iu
Fitzgerald Block, Plattsmouth, Nebraska.
17YI .
HTKVEXSOX Al JIlHr IX,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, Plattsmouth and
Nebraska C"ty, Neb.
Ihos. B. Stkvenson, I E. J. Mcrfix,
Nebraska City. 1 over smiin & liiacK s
Neb. 1 Drug Store,
13ly 1 Plattsmouth, er.
ii XV. CLl'TTEK.
DB1TTIST.
Plattsmonth. Nebraska.
Office on Main Street over Solomon & Na
than's Store. 34iy
PLATTSMOUTH MILLS.
PLATTSMOUTH, NEB.
C. IIEISEL,, - Proprietor.
Flour, Corn Meal Feed
Always on hand and for sale at lowest casn
prices. The highest prices paid for Wheat and
Corn. Particular attention given custom work.
CHARLES WAItllllV.
Tonsorial Artist.
PLATTSMOUTH XEBltASKA.
Place of business on Main St., between 4th
and 6th streets. Shampooing, Shaving, chil
dren's hair cutting, etc. etc. 191y
FRED. D. LEHNHOFF,
Morning Dew Saloon !
South-east corner Main and Sixth Streets.
Keep the best of
Beer, Wines, Liquors & Cigars.
33m9 Constantly on Hand.
BRICK! SRICK!
If you want any
Fire or Ornamental Brick,
Call on
J. T. A. HOOVER,
LOUISVILLE, - - NEBRASKA
BATES &
KOHNKE.
"New Carpenter Shop on Main
Street,
Corner of 7th.
BUILDERS CONTRACTORS
AND
GENERAL WORKMEN
In the Carpenter line.
AND
MACHINE SHOPS !
FLATT8MOUTII, NEB.,
Repairer of Steam Engines, Boilers,
Saw and Grist Mill
UAH AM) STEAM FITTItvOS,
wrought Iron Pipe, Force and Lift Pipes.Steam
Uauges, saiety-v alve governors, ana an
kinds of Brass Engine Fittings,
repaired on short notice.
FARM MACHINEM"
Excelsior Barber Shop.
J. O. BOONE,
One door west of SolomonWINathan's Store,
HATB-CTJTTIIsrG,
SHAVING AND SHAMPOOING
Especial attention given to
CUTTING CHILDREN'S AND LA
DIES' HAIR.
ALL AND SEE BOONE. GENTS,
And get a boon in a
CZLYELA-TST SHAVE.
WILLIAM HEROLD,
dealer a
DRY GOODS.
CLOTHS.
BLANKETS,
FLANNELS,
FURNISHING G00D3
:o:
GROCERIES OF ALL KINDS.
Large stock of
BOOTS ana SHOES
to be
CLOSED OUT AT COST
Notions, Queensware
and In fact everything you can call for in
the line of
General Merchandise.
CASH PAID FOR HIDES AND FURS.
aii Kinas oi country oroduca taken In ex
change for goods.
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
Sae Directory,
A. S. PADDOCK. IT. S. Senator, Beatrice.
ALVIN SAUNDERS. U. S. Senator, Omaha.
E. K. VALENTINE, Representafe. West Point.
ALBIN US NANCE. Governor, Lincoln.
S. J. ALEXANDER, Secretary of State.
F. W. LEI DTKE, Auditor, Lincoln.
G. M. BARTLETT, Treasurer, Lincoln.
S. R. THOMPSON, Supt. Public Instruction.
F. M. DAVIS, Land Commissioner.
C. J. DILWORTH. Attorney General.
REV. C. C. HARRIS. Chaplain of Penitentiary.
DR. II. P. MATTHEWSON, Supt. Hospital for
the Insane.
Supreme Court.
S. MAXWELL. Chief Justice, Fremont.
GEO. B. LAKE, Omaha.
AMASA COBB, Lincoln.
o
Second Judicial District.
S. B. rOUND. Judge. Lincoln.
J. C. WATSON. I"rosecuting-AU'y. Neb. City.
W. C. SHOWALTER, Clerk District Court,
Plattsmouth.
o
County Directory.
A. N. SULLIVAN, County Judge.
J. D. TUTT. County Cleric.
J. M. PATTERSON , County Treasurer.
R. W. HYERS. Sheriff.
E. H. WOO LEY, Co. Sup't Pub. Instruction.
G. W. FAIRFIELD. Surveyor.
P. P. GASS, Coroner.
COUNTY commissioners.
JAMES CRAWFORD, South Bend Precinct.
SAM'L RICHARDSON. Mt. Pleasant Precinct.
ISAAC WILES, Plattsmouth Preciuet.
City Directory,
3. W. JOHNSON, Mavor.
J. M. PATTERSON, Treasurer.
J. D. SIMPSON, City Clerk.
RICHARD VIVIAN. Police Judge. -P.
B. MURPHY. Chief of Police.
F. E. WHITE, Chief of Fire Dept,
councii-mf.n.
1st Ward F. GORDER. C. II. PARMELE.
2d Ward G W. FAIRFIELD, J. V. WECK-
(. BACH.
3d Ward-D. MILLER. THOS. POLLOCK.
4th Ward P. McCALLAN, E. S. SHARP.
istmasterJO. W. MARSHALL.
B. & M. R. KTime Table. '
Taking Effect April 11, 1880.
FOR OMAHA FROM PLATTSMOUTH.
leaves 8 :(o a. m. Arrives 10 H a. in.
3 -A1) p. m. " 6 :00 p. m.
FROM OMAHA FOR PLATTSMOUTH. .
Leaves 9 K a. m. Arrives 10 -.10 a. m.
" 6 :30 p. m. ' 8 :15 p. IU.
FOR THE WEST.
Ieaves Plattsmouth 9 :30 a. m. Arrives Lin
coln, 12 -15 p. in. ; Arrives Kearuey, c 40 p. m.
Freight leaves at 10 iso a. in. ana at :io p. m.
Arrive at Lincoln at 4 :35 p. m. and 12 :20 a. m.
FROM THE WEST.
Leaves Kearney, 8 KK) a. in. Leaves Lincoln,
.05 p. in. Arrives Plattsmouth. 4 :25 p. m
Freight leaves Lincoln at 11 :15 a. m. and 4 :00
m. Arrives at Plattsmouth at 4 ;40 p. m. aud
:50 a. in.
GOING EAST.
Express, 6 :00 a. m.
Pa-ssenger. (train each day) 4 :ii5 p. m., except
Saturday. -Every third Saturday a train con
nects at the usual nine.
It. V. II. El. Time Table
Tafcint; Effect Sunilay, -AjtiI 11, 1880.
WKST.
STATIONS. EAST.
HASTINGS. 8 :10am
AYR. 7:40
BLUE HILL. 7 :20
COWLKS. 6:49
AM BOY 6:32
RED CLI'UD. 6 :'J0
1NAVALH. 6:00
RlvERTON. 5:43
FRANKLIN. 5:22
BLOOM 1NGTOS. 5 K)9
PERTH 4 :55
REPUBLICAN 4:35
ALMA 4 :20
j mfIF.v-a I I've 4:00am
i ORLEANS far 4.30pm
OXFORD 3:30
ARAPAHOE 2 :00pin
5 :3opm
6 :07
6 :28
7 :05
7 :23
7 :35
8 :00
8 :15
8 :50
9 :05
:20
9:41
9 :56
10 :15
7 :30am
9 :00
10:30
ARRIVAL AXI DKPARTt'ItE OF
PLATTSMOUTH 3IAILS.
-v
EASTERN, NOUTRERN AND SOUTHERN.
I llPiinrt. EiLst. .4 : 00 Dm
Arrive 9 :30 am CB&KC North4 :00 pm
" 7 ; JO pni 1 i7OUlII V . w onl
ICB&l East C : 00 am
OMAHA. VIA B. & M. IN NEB.
Arrive.. . ...10 : 30 am Depart 3:10 pm
WESTERN, VIA B. & M. IN NEB.
Arrive 4 : 15 pm Depart 9 : 30 am
WEEPINO WATER.
Arrive 11 :00 am Depart l :oo pm
ROCK BLUFFS AND UNION MILLS.
Arrive 11 : 00 am Depart 1 : 00 pm
J. W. Marshall. P. M.
STOMACH
i a
Defensive Medication
Is a urecaution which should never be neglect
ed when danger is present, and therefore a
course ot tne miters at mis season is parucu
lurlv desirable, especially for the feeble and
sickly. As a remedy for biliousness, dyspepsia,
nervousness and bowel complaints, there Is
nothing comparable to this wbolesonie restor
ative.
For sale by all Druggists and Dealers
generally.
Testimonial to Mr. Fellows.
"IVe. tbe undarsigned. Clergymen of the Meth
' odist church in Nova Scotia, having used
Ihe nrcn.iration known as Fkllows' Com
pound SvniTP or Hvpophosphitks, prepar
ed ny james i. rELLOws. (ji. enlist. rt. Jonn.
N. B., or having known eases wherein its ef
fects were beneficial, believe it to be a reliable
remedy for the diseases for which it is recom
mended.
JAMES G. IIENXIGAR.
Pres. of Conference.
JOHN MclllKKAY.
tx-Pre. of Conference.
WM. SARGENT.
JOHN A. MOSHER,
JOHN W. HOWIE.
STEPHEN F. HUESTIS.
RICHARD W. WEDDALL.
ALEX. W. NICHOLSON.
CKANSWICK .IOST.
KOWLAND MORTON.
JOHN JOHNSON.
FELLOWS'
COMPOUND SYRUP
HYPOPHOSPHITES
Speedily and permanently cures Congestion of
the Lungs. Bronchitis, Consumption, Nervous
Prostration, Shortness of Breath. Palpitation
of the Heart, Trembling of the Hands and the
Limbs, Physical and Mental Depression, Loss
ot Appetite, Loss of Energy. Loss of Memory,
and will rapidly Improve the weakened func
tions and organs of the body, which depend
tor neaitn upon voluntary, seini-voiuntary and
involuntary nervous action. It acts with vleor.
gentleness and subtlety, owing to the exquisite
harmony of its Ingredients, akin to pure blood
useii. j ti taste is pleasant ana its euects per
maneut,
Look nut for the name aad address. J. I
FKLLOWS. St. John. N. B., on the yellow
wrauier, 1.1 water-mark, which is seen by bold-
ms me paper oeiore tne i:gut.
Price, $1.50 per Bottle. Six for $7.50.
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS.
nd MORFTIINE libit
atMl pe4iif cured. I aia
N MMicfiT. Hu4 at Amis
0 LEBRATEO l
m.
fa R 8BBI fl
JVcLtiorLaZ (ZiepzibZicciri Ticket
For President of He United States,
GEN. JAMES A. GARFIELD.
OIF1 OHIO.
The Quecu in her Carriage is Riding br
Oh, the queen in her carriage is passing by t
iter cneeKs are like roses, ner eyes like tne say
Her wonderful teeth are white as new milk.
Her pretty blonde hair is softer than silk.
She's the loveliest monarch that ever was seen
You ask of what country the darling is queen :
Her empire extends no, to far-distant parts.
She's queen of our household, the mistress of
hearts.
For scepter she lifts her soft, dimpled hands ;
Her subjects all hasten to heed her commands ;
Her smile Is bewitching, and fearful her frown,
Aud all must obey when she puts her foot down.
May blessings descend on th bright little head
From the time she awakes till she's safely in bed
And now do you guess, when I speak of the
queen,
TIs only our six months baby I mean.
THE PHILADELPHIA MIXT.
Phildelphla Press. 4
The Unitcil Stales mint wa3 estao-
lished bv act of Congress on the 2d
of April, 1792, and a build in? was
soon erected on theeast snlcot beventn
near Market. The first machinery,
as well as motal. used, came from
Englan:!, and up to 1816 tho work
was altogether done by horse or Baud
power. During live years of the
mint s existence work has been sus
pended, owingr to the prevalence of
disease in the cit.v. The present build-
in on CheMiut near Broad, was fin-
hed in K . 3. It is built of vrlute
marble. the Grecian style. In 1854
it was nude thoroughly lire proof.
The following are some mterestinor
statements of the periods at which
time coin has been made, and of the
coinage: JN o eagles were coined irom
lSuo to 1837, inclusive; no half-eagles
in 1816 or 1S17; no quarler-cagles be
fore 1796, nor in 1800 or 1801, nor from
1800 to 1820, or in 1822, 1823, 1828, or
iu 1811 1 no dollars from 1808 to 1838,
except 1,000 in 1836; no half-dollars
from 1797 to low, nor in isio; no
quarters ueiore iao, none irom iaa
to lu:i. none imui ito;s io hi, ana
none in nu, i -jh.i no
nc in 1817, '24, 2o,
l.i ft j i .
dimes before 1796, none in 1799, 1506.
OS. '12, '13, '15 to '19, none in '24, '23
and '30: no hall'-dnnes in 19S, 1790,
1801, 1806 to 1828; no cents in 181o, a
few specimens in 1823; no half-cents
in 1798, 1801, 1812 to 1821, 1827 to 1830
1834, 1837 and 1810. A few half-cents
were struck every year from 1840 to
1857. . First $3 pieces in 1854.
The mints at Carson and San Fran
cisco coin gold and silver only. Tho
mint at Denver does not make coins.
Its operations are confined to assaying
and refining.
But now the grim watch-dog of the
mint is waiting to go through the
building with us. All is silent and
still : the buzz and beat of machinery
has ceased ; the flashing colors of the
day are dead; but a dim, dull light
suffices to show the powerful agciita
of making money. Ou the left of the
hall, aa we enter, is the Treasurer's
office: on the right the cashier's, bjth
now deserted. Passing through the
hall to a yard on the left, is seen the
weighing room. Here all the precious
metal received is weighed. Gold from
California, Georgia, Montana, and
Jsova Scotia; silver from .Nevada, aud
tiie most of the world. Here comes
the valuable family plate to be melted
up, telling the story of decayed for
tunes ana destroyed hopes; just as the
lirst bricks of silver but i-eceiitly
wrenched from the bosom of mother
earth tell the tale of hopes realized
wild fortunes m uie. Here, loo, comes
copper from Lake Superior, and nickel
lini our own duuo of Lancaster,
lierc are piled huge bricks o" silver,
tons in weilu; each urick weighs
from 100 to loo pound.-, w.'iicii are
ban. ilea as u.wugu Uiey were clay.
Jeitr at hand are me scales to wei 'h
liiis muss of potential money. As in
fallible as tne soaies oi justice, tuey
will mark the sligiuest an mota min
ute amount as well us- tne gro-.ueot.
Tue largest weight used in l.e vvcigh-ing-rooiii
is G,uo0 ounces; tiie smallest
weiglit used in tho nun; is in the assay-room,
and oue-liiii'lcen-iiundredtii
part of uu ounce is iu mj; it can
uareiy be seen by the n:i&cd eye. Here
is tue vault where goid is kept pris
oner; tiouole l.iiiiigs of iron, uoubie
cioors oi tjioi i, aii.i iuckj and boils of
Hie ii.ost ii.viio.ite description all
Snow iie curtj auii eautiou necessary
to be oo&erve.i. - S.epiug iiisivle, tlicre
lie quictiy Siiiaii uu.i igaoi.8, r liuii
give a.uu.1, yeiiovT yioam in the can-
..t..ll..l.l V- :Mttr.vl. r !lw iiiIhim
vet wiiicn Vui soul i go .oi'iu and t's.
ert a reiier jiovfcr tor we.ii or woe
ttian that exerted by tue migntKst
living potentates.
Goto, oust, y rains of gold and cry
sUl lined lumps are here ready for tne
reciters pot. lo the deposit melting.
room next it goes in locked iron boxes,
from which it is placed in pots, ana
with a suitaoie nux is uiened and
molded. Tilts are cnt o(T for awvvin;?.
and then it roes to the refiner and
melter. For assavinr the srold the
small piece is taken to the assaver's
room, now a dark aMirttnent rcpemb
ling1 Dr. Faufiiis' chamber, with its
cruicibles, kettles an 1 pans. The gold
is put in a black lead pot, molted and
fluxed and stirred uv to mike a com
plete mixture; cooled and rolled out.
Then half a gramme is accurately
weighed, which is sU'iine 1 1,000, nd
all the weiirhts liern.tfrer ud are de
cimal of this to the ten-thousandth
part. Silver for tho alloyin i next
added, and then the lad'for thecupel
lation; then the whole is cupelled un
til the base metals are fused, and then
the remaining bullion is beaten in a
spiral and the silver dissolved out and
the remaining gold determined by
weight. To return to the melting-
For Vice-President of tne United States,
GEN. CHESTER A. ARTHUR,
OF HEW YORK.
room ; it is there that all the gold and
6ilvcr used in the mint are melted;
Iron mollis are useJ, which are pre
Tiously greased to prevent sticking,
and as the metals arc in a molten mass
they are poured into those molds and
speedily cooled, after which they are
called ingots, and arc long, thin blocks
of a rich color, though not yet show
ing their perfect beauty. Hero, liter
ally, gold and silver are in the air, for
tho very clothes on the workmen, the
sweepings from the floor, and water
used tor was lung, are tound to be full
of them, an I are worth $25,000 a year.
irom the mciiing-room trie bars go to
the rolling-room. The mighty revolv
ing jaws, which in tho day put forth
squirming and writhing ton -rues of
gold, are now still. Iu the day. the
ingots are passea tiirougu the rollers
tho number ot 200 an hour to each pair
of rollers, and come forth Just tho
thickness of a coiu. Behind them, in
the same room, are the cutting presses
which, with a continual snap, snap,
bite out 225 planchets of. plaiu coin
pieces in a luiuute. Of these machines
there arc ninr. As the planchets are
cut they arc taken iu bo.ve3 to tha an
nealing furuaocj, for the hard treat
ment they have received make them
brittle. -In those furnaces the metal
is heated to red heat, when it be
comes as soft and pliable as leather,
and is then taken out to cool. Then
the planchets go to the adjusting room,
where they are weighed and inspect
ed. If too light, they ar0 reniclted;
if too heavy, but uear the weight, thev
are filed to it; but if altogether too
heavy, they, too, arc reniclted. From
the adjusting room thev go to the
cleauing-rooiii, wncrc, with acid and
heat, they are thoroughly cleaned, then
dried with sawdust au.fpe.m.ii-roast-cr
arrangements. Massive monsters
are the presses, of which tliere are ten,
each capaoiu of turning out over a 100
coins a minute, which, if thev were
double eagl;?-, would amount to $34,
009. Before the planchets are put in
the coining-press they are milled, or
have their edges turned up. Now
comes the liuai operation, by which
money is literally made. The amount
of pressure retpured to m ike a perfect
coin is from twenty to eighty tons
the larger tiie coin the greater the
weight. The phincncis arc put in a
brass tube, and, with each impression
of the press, are caught in two iron
arms and placed on tho lower die,
which is in the. bed of tho press, cor
responding to the upper die, and, by
the coming together oi those two dies
are the coins struck. As tiie plauchet
rests on the iower die, the upper de
scends, and tiie plauchet is pressed by
them; instantly the two arms catcli
the struck coin aui throw it into a
box bcne.uh. At this moment it is
legal coin, and not before. Gathering
tue coin iroia the boxes, they are
placed on the count mg-ooards, which
ure groove. t u-.-ir.:s something like
washing-Ovjar .s, :i.ch arc divided so
a io .loi t j.Hi. a ccr.aui tnini jcr of
coins. A i.:iC cjtns arc run in grooves
una coii.iL-.'ii, i y are pouiea in a
lira .ver, i"o.i v.'ii...a tiiey are la.vcti,
co.inie.., put l.i wags, una ure t.icu
iva.iy to U" .oi'itl to n.a..e l.io U ul'a
Ui V I'ciCiiC-; S of :i.:ppl.i;S6.
Appcnzell.
Harper's Magazine.
Near to Sargans the Rhine becomes
the dividing line between the Austrian
Tyrol and East Switzerland. The
Swiss Canton of Appcnzell "the lit
tle land of Appenzcll' with its pas
toral people and its queer customs,
runs in here to get a peep at the pas
sing river. These Appcnzcllers are a
very democratic people, even for dem
ocratic Switzerland. It is not only
that every man has a voice in the law
making that it is democratic, but it is
also in tho primitive way in which
a 1 " -a a-n.
tne win 13 expressed, mere was a
time when peoples chose their kinsrs
cn masse on a field, and giving the
tallest man the crown. Something
very similar is practiced even now in
little Appcnzell.
"Kvni'V MftV rlnv tfi wlirJn rnlin
population of the canton meet, an3
armed with swords and umbrellas,
and led by a band of music, march
out to a meadow, where the affairs of
state ana the election ot onicers arc
settled in a short time by tho sovcr
eign people. The women of Appen-
reu occasionally join in tins proces
sion, and the grave looking officials
rigged iu the uniform of state, gallant
ly give to the ladies the best standing
room on the green. A littlo platform
for the town grandees is elevated,
around which the procession halts and
listens to a prayer. Then follow the
allkirs of state, decided simply by a
6how of hands. Taxes are voted, tines
laid, and officers chosen for the next
year. In a few hours Appenzell's out
door parliament is finished, and the
people go to their homes and lay their
swords and flags away to rest tor an
other year. This has been Appcn
zell's parliament for five hundred
years.
The lumber business is one of Geor
gia's growing industries. It is esti
m.itea that this year's product will
amount to 900,uoo,000 leet, and will
exceed m value 5,000,000. No indus
try in the Slaic has assumed such pro
portions iu tiie same period as has this
in tiie past four years. In regard to
the timoer interest of the wiregrass
section it is stated that timber Is now
; bringing better prices than it has for
l year.
Tests of Steel and Iron.
Nitric acid will produce a black
spot on steel : the dai kcr the spot the
harder the steel. Iron, on the con
trary, remains bright if touched with
nitric acid.
Good steel in its soft stare has a
curved fracture aud a uniform gray
lustre ; in its hard state a dull, silvery,
uniform white. Cracks, threads or
sparkling particles denote bad quality.
Good steel will not bear a white
he.it without falling to pieces, and
will crumble under the hammer at a
bright heat, while at a middling heat
it may be drawn out under the ham
mer to a fine point.
Care should ba taken that before
attempting to draw it out to n point,
the tract u re is not concave; and
should it be so, the end should be filed
to an obtuse point before operating.
Sicel should be drawn out to a fine
point and plunged into cold water;
the fractured point should scratch
glass. To test its toughness, place a
fragment on a block of cast iron; if
good, it may be driven by the blow of
a hiiiuincr into the cast iron: if poor,
it will crush under the blow.
A soft, tough iron, if broken grad
ually, gives long 6ilky fibres of leaden
gray hue, which twist together and
cohere before breaking.
A medium even grain with fibres
denotes good iron,
Badly refined iron eives a short
blackish fibre on fracture. A very
fine grain denotes hard steeiy iron, like
lv to be cold-short and hard.
Coarse grain, with bright crystal
lized fracture or discolored spots, de
notes cold-short, brittle iron, which
works easilv when heated and welds
well. Cracks on the edge of a bar
arc indications ot hot-snort Iron.
Good iron is readily heated, is soft
under the hammer, aud throws out
few 6parks.
Interglacial Quartz Workers ta Min
nesota.
In 1876 Prof AVinchell found in and
around Little Falls, Minnesota, a
number of fragments of wrought
quartz in surface deposits underneath
the remains of the mound builders.
Prof Winchell, accordingly, fixed the
era of the quartz workers bei :n
that of the mound builders and the
close of the glacial epoch.
At a late meeting of the Historical
Society, at Minneapolis, Minn., Fran
cis K. Babbit gave an account of a
considerable deposit ot quartz chips
and implements found in regular
strata, which must have been formed
before the close of the glacial period.
The specimens consist of hammers,
implements, etc., both finished and
unfinished, together with chips struck
oil" from the articles in the process of
manufacture. The material of which
they are composed is principally com
pact, lustrous quartz, frequently mot
tled as if selected with an eye to the
artistic beauty. Tiie stratum is some
few inches in thickness, and lies in the
6oil a few feet below the surface. The
appearances indicate that this was
once the site of a manufactory of such
quartz objects, and this idea is upheld
by various considerations. There are
tools found such as would be used in
the manufacture of quartz articles, and
the whole stratum is mixed with
chips, which in many cases appear
stuck in the dirt just as they fell from
the hand of the unknown. Unfinished
implements are also found in more or
less advanced stages of manufacture.
It is not possible to fix the precise
point occupied by these remains in
the scale of the glacial epoch until the
drift features aud surrounding forma
tions of the locality shall be better
understood than now. Still it is cer
tain that the remains belong to a
people living before the end of the
last glacial period, because they are
deposited in a drift which is known
to ue of glacial origin. The hard pan
upon which the quartz formations lie
is probably of the first glacial period,
and the quartz may belong to an inter
glacial epoch.
Overheated Rooms.
The great tendencv in winter is io
keep rooms too warm. The founda
tion of pneumonia, pleurisy, and pul
monary consumption is frequently
laid in over-heated, ill-ventilated
apartments. The inmates become ac
customed to breathing hot, close air,
the system is toned down aud relaxed,
and a slight exposure to cold and wet
results in serious illness. The greater
deirree of health is obtained by per
sons who habitually take out-door
exercise, and the ripe old sge of our
forefathers can be ascribed in a great
measure to the tact that their houses
were open to not only the rentle
breezes of summer, but to the howl
ing blasts of winter. Log huts con
structed in its most primitive fash
ion, in many cases not even "chink
ed," give free access at all times to
the pure air, aud if the cold and
snow did enter, they brought with
them health and long life. A uniform
heat of seventy degrees is adequate
fnru a sanitary point ot view in any
weather, if that temperature is not
sufficient to give warmth, it is an in
dication that the person does not take
sufficient exercise, and the cure for it
is more miles than flannel. In the
coldest weather, when the ground is
like stone under feet, when there is
no drip from the caves, and when
snow lies on roofs, rooms should bs
ventilated. Pure air should be ad
mi tied through open doors and
windows, so that the oxygen consumed
by flame and by respiration may ba
replaced, and effete and poisonous
matter thrown otf by the body thor
oughly driven away.
Last year there were driven into
Nevada from eastern Oregon over
200,000 head of best cattle. Over 140,
000 crossed in one place. From the
coast there went to Montana and the
east over 200,000 head. This new deal
commenced only two years ago.
The evangelist Moody and Sanky
passed through the Indian Territory,
and while at Muskogee, in the Creek
nation, Mr. Moody arranged to receive
ten Indian girls from that nation, for
whom he will procure free education
at the young ladies' seminary estab
lished by him at Northfleld, Mass.
Under the old law marriage cere
monies could be performed in Cali
fornia by any jndge, justice of the
peace, mayor, clergyman, or preacher
of the gospel, but by an act of the
present legislature they can be sol
emnized only by a justice of the su
preme court, judge of the superior
court, justice of the peace, or minister
of the gospel.
TTonderful Head.
HilladalphU Tinea.
Charles Erllng is a most remarkable
specimen of man. Ever sine his birth
he has been unable to stand upon his
feet, on account of the weight of his
head, which is of abnormal size. For
twenty-eight years, tbe length of his
life, he has been compelled to lie abed
continually. He was born in Burling
ton county, N. J. He lacks one inch
of being five inches in length, but
would probably have grown longer
had he been in the habit of takinr
physical exercise. His head appears
to be six times the ordinary size, and,
his mother says, has always been as
disproportionate in weight to the lest
of his body as it is now.
Tne measurement around the head at
the middle of the forehead is thlrtv-
three inches, while the line passing
over the crown and under the chin is
forty-four inches. The inuer corner
of the eyes are four inches apart the
distance from temple to temple is
thirteen inches, aud the bridge of the
nose is six inches below the upper
line of the forehead.
The trunk of the body is about the
same in size of many a biz fat boy that
walks the streets, but tha muscies are
soft and weak for want of activity.
The measurement around the chest is
forty-for r inches and around the waist
thirty-five inches. His legs, however.
are no thicker than those of an 8-year-old
boy of ordinary size.
He extends his hands to visitors, bids
them good-dajr and chats with them
in a childish manner. He seems to
have an evenly balanced mind, but it
is that of a prattling infant. lie can
not read, and never would try to learn
even the alphabet, as his neck, although
no weaker than might be expected in
a person who has always been confin
ed to his bed, was not strong enough
to move his head without giviug him
am. His parents nave had no child
ut Charles. The father is dead, but
the mother is with him. Both pa
rents were healthy, of ordinary stat
ure, and possessed the average physi
cal development.
Remarkable Rides.
All the Tar Hound.
More remarkable r!des than the fa
mous ride to York are upon record.
By dint of keeping constantly in the
saddle and having relav of horses all
along the road, the Prince de Linge
contrived to cover the miles between
Vienna and Paris over live hundred.
as the crow flies in six davs. This
performance was outdone by the Count
de Maintenay, who rode the whols
distance on one horse, without dis
mounting. The Count, one of the
most accomplished horsemen of his
day, was attached to negotiate for the
hand of Mary Louise, and wasdepuLed
to carry to his impatient muster ins
formal consent of the Emperor of Aus
tria to the marriage, and the minia
ture of the unwilling bride-elect. To
expedite his journey, six of the finest
horses in the Imperial stables were
dispatched to different places on the
route, that the Count mii'ht clian -e
his mount; but the Hungarian road
ster he bestrode at starling went so
fast and stayed so well that the reUys
were not called into service, and the
matrimonial messenger arrived at his
destination long before he was expect
ed, but so exhausted that ht was fain
to crave permission to be seated in the
Emperor's presence as he delivered up
the all-imp tant mission and repeat
ed the Arcuuucr.es' message to her fu
ture lord. A jcveied siiuil-box, sixty
thousand francs, and the good Siecii lie
had ridden, rewarded tiie count for his
expedition. The Count de Maiiue
nay's te! was repeated in 1874 by in
Austrian lieutenant, who uu'.ertoo!c to
ride his horse, Caindoe, from Vienna
to Paris iu fourteeu days. He was
unlucky enough to loose his way in
the Black forest, and to waste seven
hours, and was further delayed by an
accident to his horse; nevcrihclc.-s he
accomplished his task wiiu mors than
two hours to spare.
Some Celebrated 'Women.
Londoa Queen.
Women, often debarred from prac
tical knowledge of certain aspects of
life, yet obtain a reflected comprehen
sion through sympathy. Mrs. Brown
ing possessed the gift in a transcendent
al degree ; it vibratod on the chord of
poetic expression in her; Jane Austin
and Charlotte Bronte led retired lives,
but they had the power perpetually
to pass out of their circumscribed in
dividuality into that of others and
the genius to retain and turn to ac
count the fleeting impressions of their
passing contact with individuals. The
darlings and the ornaments of society
are the women who can throw them
selves best into the interest of the mo
ment. If to this sensitive nature be
longs a native sincerity, confidence is
attracted, friendships are made and
retained. Mme. Ilccamier is perhaps
the best type of this gift of social
sympathy allied to certain reality of
nature. She attracted the bust and
most gifted of her time when ae had
marred her beauty, poverty succeeded
wealth, aud partial blindness rendered
her infirm, her salon in the Aboaye
aux Bois was still the resort of the
eminent men and women of the peri
od. She was not a wit, she was al
ways somewhat shy, but she had the
wish to win love rather than admira
tion, and possessed the tact of draw
ing out the best gifts in others. She
had the genius of friendship ; her
steadfastness could not be shaken. She
incurred exile because she would visit
Mme. de Stael against all prudent ad
vice. She lost the chance of recover
ing hsr eye-sight because she insisted
upon attending M. de Ballancoe on his
death-bed, and for eighteen years she
attended M. de Chateaudbriand in his
age and infirmity. "We would, there
fore, say that impressionable temper
ament distinguishing all sympathetic
people is either a strength or a weak
ness, according to the character allied
to it. As sympathy gives an angelic
grace to virtue, food to genius, and
steadfastness to social relationships, so
it can degenerate into nothing but
perilous, over-facile sensitiveness to
the passing impressions of the mo
meat.
The wife of Franklin Rockway, of
Collinsviiie, touu,
youngest children
put her two
bed, the other
to
ttigm, leaving a lare kerosene lamp
burning on a stand, and went beiow
to entertain soma company. An hour
later she went upstairs, and luuud
that the lanr had exploded, scatter
ing the oil and gias ail over the room
without setting anything ou lira or
wakuig the children.
.